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Sporting Notes from Home.

(Br Our Special Oorbespo^dkht in

London.)

The Victoria Clue, Oct. 20th. When I Ust wrote, the week intervening between the firat and second autumn reunions at " headquarters " (as English turfites call Newmarket) had just closed, and we wero on the eve of the big lone' distance handicap of the season -named in 1539 out of compliment to the then autocrat of Kussla-the Czarcwitck. To a great oia]Oiv'cy of Englishmen tho Derby and St, Le.;er are the only racing eveuts worth "Witnessing or having a wager upon, A nongst turfites, however, the Lincolnshire Hmdicap and City and Suburban in the sp.ing, and the Czarewitch and Cambridge saire in th« autumn, are far more serious enattcrs. The speculator who "knows a good thing" in the Derby or at Doncaster fins generally to content himself with 3 or 4 to 1, whereas if he can "spot"a likely Inrs3 for the Czuewitcb, 20 or 30, and sometimes even 50 or 100 to 1 may be obttaipable. Double-event bett'ng also serves 4o incrsiiSe the popularity of tho two races considerably. There ia something very scd.active in the bookmakers' cry, " a thousand pounds to forty shillings you don't tnarue the winners of (Jzirewitcn and Cambridgeshire," and many a hard-earned pound annually disappears in the futile attempt to achieve this feat. Owners like the Cz ueM'ftah because they can generally estimate their chances of success tolerably accurately, ■and getting home fi-st moans "a pot of money." Since the race was initiated, 43 .years ago, scores of deep-laid plots have feeen ■elaxfdra.ted with a view to winning it, and history shows that some of them oamo •off. Glancing down the list of victors, one's >eyi rests naturally on the names of Hattington (1862) and Roseberry (187G). uoth these animals were the property of oae individual—aa astute betting man named James Smith—and be purchased them as yeirlinss solely for the purpose they achieved, viz., to run the Czarevitch, Ou each occasion Smith took little short of £100.000 out of the King, and as ha never batted ordinarily, not one penny of the amounts ever went back again. Another bi™ coup was brought to a successful issue in 1866 by the luckless Marquis of Hastings. He had already played ducks and drakes with a tak-sized fortune, but "little Lecturer" (as his master fondly called him) was a, real good thing, and when he passed the past a gallant winner by a couple of lengths more than one bookmaker well nigh fainted. Of late years big) sums were won by the successors of Uuke of Parma (1878) and Hilarious (1877) and in 1874, but for Aventuriere, Mr Fred Swindell (generally known aa the Talleyzand of the Tarf) would have achieved one of the smartest coups of the decade with ilia Truth gelding. Uafortuoately the careless one could only get second, and two years later another well "readied" animal of Mr Swindell's again held this disappointing place. Tho Czatowitch is run over a straight course 2 miles 2 furlongs and 28 yards in length, and it takes, I need scarcely say, a stranger to win. But let me tell ray story consecutively. The Newmarket secoad October meeting commenced on the afternoon of the 9th instant, when the Czarewitch Trial Handicip and the Clearwell Stakes were tha most interesting events. The latter is an old fashioned race for two-year-olds, which of late years has baen quite a benefit for Lord ifaltnouth and Archer. On this occasion, however, an exceptionally strange field turned out to oppose the great jockay on his lordship's Duchess of Cornwall, including Lord Cadogan's Goldfield, Lord Bradford's Mendili, Mr Qretton's Acrostic, Prince Batthyany's Sarchedon, Mr Kecne's Potosi,' Mr Lorillard's Massassoit, Lord Calthorpe's Symphony, and the crack French fi'ly (M. Lefevre's) Hauteur. The latter was, of course, first favourite, 2 to 1 being betted against her, and 5 to 1 each against Goldfield and Smyphony. At the distance Archer looked formidable on Duchesj of Cornwall, but she Boon gave way to Goldfield, who in turn succumbed' to Hauteur filly, Fordham winning on her eventually rather easily. The Czarewitch Tcial Handicap is not a big race, but sufficed to entirely revolutionise the betting on the Czarewitch itself. The course is, as the name suggests, the same as that over which the Major Han die ip is contested, and special interest was felt in the result, because three of the competitors, viz., Marc Antony, St. Cecilia, and Edelweiss were stable companions (and possibly trial horses) of the Czatewitch favourites City Arab, Winterbourne, and Cotiie Roy. The talent made Edelweiss favourite, and the mare justified thek confidence by cantering home half-a-dozen lengths in front of St. Cecilia, Maro Antony nowhere. The wretched figure cut by the latter sent back City Arab (erstwhile first favourite) to 7 to 1, whilst Corrie Roy (stable companion to Uriel weiss) jumped from 20 to 6 to 1 ia a minute. The morning of the great race dawned dull but fine, and the early trains brought hundreds of cheap trippers from all parts ot England. Kacing commenced with a post sweepstakes for three-year-olds, in which the liberal odds of 9 to 4 laid ou Mr Barnes's Tarry Woo were overturned by Mr Crawford's Sonsie Lass. This successful initiation for the "all scarlet" (Mr Crawford's colour;) seemed auspicious, and -when it transpired that the Duchess of Montrose (Mr Crawford's wife) had instructed ier commissioner never to stop backing uonie itoy whilst 4 to 1 could be obtained, there was quite a rush to be on the presumed good thing, After two more small races, the numbers for the Czarewitch were duly hoisted, and we learnt that the field (14) would be the smallest sines Cruiskeen won in 1839. The North of England folks to a man stood Mr Jardine's Shrewsbury (3yrs., 6st 12ibs); aad so much money poured into the market toward* the last, that (despite the opposition of the Leviathan of the London Ring—Lee—who never ceased laying him) the colt started first favourite at 7 to 2, Corrie Koy (4yrs , Bst 71bs) wa-i next in demand at 5 to 1, whilst 100 to 14 was laid against Lord Bradford's Chippendale (6yre., Bst 121b?). 8 to 1 against the Duke of Hamilton's City Arab (3yrs,, 7at), 100 to 12 apainst Lord Bradford's Betreat, 15 to 1 Winterboume and Baron Farney, 20 to 1 Tasmau, 50 to 1 each Borneo, Minelte, Marden, and Abbotsford, and 100 to 1 Marc Antony. The horses got away to a splendid start (so the jockeys say), and when they came in sight, a mile from home, the colours of Shrewsbury, City Arab, Marden, and Corrie Roy, could bs observed well to the fore. Opposite the Ditch' Mile Stand, which lies a quarter of a mile below the Czarewitch winning post, the favourite was going great guns, and shouts were raised that he would win easily, almost immediately, however, we heard the cry, "Shrewsbury's beat," and Chippendale assumed the lead, with City Arab and Uorrie Boy as his immediate attendants. The latter was pulled back just here by his rider (Charlie Wood) for a stride or two, but he let him out opposite the stand, and the colt cantering to the front without even 'the semblance of an effort, won in a canter by three lengths from Chippendale, between whom and City Arab (third) 4 lengths intervened. Time, 4 minutes 9 seconds. The winner belongs, as I have said, to Mr Crawford and is bred by Galopin, out of Corrie, by Stock-veil. He wai entered for the Czarewitch last year, and would prsbably have run and won only his party finding they had been forestalled in the betting market, and could not get fair odds, scratched ths colt. Subsequently he won the Jockey Club Cup (3 miles), baating Chippendale and three others. This year Corrie Koy had not been seen in public save once, when he ran last for the Goodwood fc'akes; nevertheless, prior to the publication of the weights he was again a great favourite for the Czarewitch. The handicappers, however (who naturally discourage bottling up horses) gave Mr Crawford's colt the steadier of Bat 71bs to carry, and he went promptly back to 50 to 1 (offered). Last week a trial with Thebais and Edelweiss (both known to be in grand form at present) revealed to the trainer that Corrie Roy was no ordinary handicap hack, but a very superior stayer that ought to win easily, and ever since then he has been backed unceasingly. _ The inhabitants of Newmarket were " on" to a man, and the Ring will remember the Czarewitch of 1882 as one oi the worst big races they betted on since Roseberry's year. Though not to be compared with the victories of Robert the Devil, who won the Czarewitch as a three-year-old with Bst 61b3,"0r Julius, who got home at the same age with Sst., Corrie Roy's performanca is yet a very respectable one, Bat 71bs being in fact the highest weight that has been carried first past the pest since the initiation of the handicap. . • Old Chippendale, tao winner of the Cztrewitch in 3879, When he carried 7st, wa» weighted at 51bs, ran uncommonly well for a veteran, but could get no nearer Corrie Boy than Foxhall, to whom {carrying precisely the Bame burden, Bst 121bs, enriously enough) ha was second in 1881. City Arab was..a bad third, and probably held the position on sufferance only, as

when pursuit «f the winner seemed hopeless, a number pulled up. The Wednesday of tho second Ootober week was a wretched day from every point of view, for it poured with rain, and not a single iir.it favourite proved successful. The chief events were, of course, the Middle Park Platp> which is the most valuable two-year-old race of tho year, and the t elect Stakes, an old • fashioned three-year-old contest. A fair field ot seventeen youngsters turned out for the first-named event, including all the crack performers of the season, save Lord Falmouth's G illiard. The great "tip" of the "itDOwalls" was Highland Chief, a haltbrother to COrrie Roy (by Hampton), be'loogiog to Lord KHesmere. His party engaged Aichor to tide, and so confident were they of winning that they staked their money in thousands, the consequence being the colt started favourite at 5 to 2, Mr Crawford's Machoatb, though carrying tho extensive penalty of 71bs, which made his weight Oat 31bs. wai next in demand at 9 to 2, and the others fancied, but at long prices, were Mr Perkins's Chisclhurst, M. Lefevre's Ladislus and Hauteur, Mr Crawfod's Knorgy, and Lord Cadogan's Goldfield. At the distance, Archer shot out on the, favourite, and everyone thought he was going to win easily. Iho colt, however, filled to stay home, and Macheath (splendidly ridden by Wood), taking up the running opposite the Stand, soon tad her beaten, and won a good race by half-a-length, Cbhelhuftt, three-quarters of a length off, third.

For the Select Stakes, tho Derby winner —Shotover, iht 31bs -was pulled out, her opponents being Mr lloihchild's Nellie (Bst 71bs) and Lord Risebery's Rermessa (Sst 7lbs). The latter, it will bo remembsred, was the crack performer of last year, but met with an accident this spring which prevented her runuimr in the Derby and Leger. t f course, slight odds were laid on Shotovec, but the mare could not concede ths weight, and a terrific struggle between Kermesse and Nellie resulted in a dead heat. A division took place and Kermesse Walked over. Notwithstanding the pouring rain which continued to fall on Thursday freely, much the came as on Wednesday, people flocked to Newmaruet in thousands to witness the Champion Stakes, It is gratifying to record that they were entertained with one of those sensational races seldom met with oftener than three or four times in fifty years. The Champion Stakes, a happy thought of the late Admiral Rous'p, has only been in existence since 1877, but the ro!l of winners includes the names of Springfield, Kayon dOr, Jeannette, Robert the Devil and Bend ur, all giants of their time, ond well worthy the titlti ot champion. The nominations for the race have to be made twelve months beforehand, aud 1000 soys. are added by the Jockey Club to a sweepstake of 20 boys. each, h ft. The stakes consequently are worth close on £3000. As the conditions allow of thrco, four, and five-year olds, meeting at wcight-for-age, the field invariably includes all the best animals in training capable ot compassing the famous course " across the flat," 1 mile 2 furlongs 72 yards. On the present occasion the runners were the St, Leger victri?:, Dutch Ovon, ridden by Archer; tho winner of last year's Oaks, Mr Crawford's Thebais, ridden by Wood; Lord Bradford's Battlefield; Mr Lefevrc'a Credo ; Piiuco SoltykofFs famous flyer, Scobell; and the invincible French horse Tristan (ridden by Fordham), which has beaten good fields over all distances this season. Betting opened at " 6 to 4 on tho field, pick which yon like." but the confidence of the talent was soon seen to be reposed in Fordham'a mount, and the final quotations were, 2 to 1 ngiinst Tristan, 5 to 2 against Dutch Oven, 100 to 30 against Thebais, 8 to 1 Scobell, 20 to 1 against Battlefield, and 100 to 1 against Credo. After a perfect start, the field came streaming across tha plain in line, the colours of Scobell and the Fr.ucb p iir(Tristan and Credo)being observed on the lef ', DutchU veil inthe centre,and Tbebaison the right with Battlefield. The pace—a regular "cracker" —soon proved too much for the last named and Credo, and though as they neared homo Scobell looked momentarily formidable be failed to stay, and compounded opposite the first stand. The issue was now left to the three celebrities, and as they appeared to be ail going well within themselves the interest grew more and more intense. Dutch Oven took up the running,followed by Thebak, who gradually got oa terms with.the Leger heroine, ana challenged her. A ding-dong struggle then ensued which, despite Archer's vigorous effoits,Thcbaisgotthebestof,and for an instant the race seemed to be over, and loud shouts of "Crawford's won again" rent the air. At this crisis, however, Tristan, whom Fordham had seemed to be tiding rather sleepily, came with a tremendous rush on the left, and catching the other pair almost at the post, th» three ran past the judge's box literally locked together, in fact so close that till the numbers went up nobody knew what had won ; a moment's suspense, and then Mr Clark (the judge) announced a dead heat between Thebais and Tristan, Dutch Oven being beaten a short neck only third.

After this memorable struggle (which was not repeated, the owners of the dead-heateis preferring to divide), the rest of the day's racing seemed commonplace enough till the Queen's Plate came on the tapis. In this event the Czarewitch second, Cuippendile, was opposed at even weights over a severe two miles and a half course by Edelweiss, Hagioscope, SpitzbergeD, Is-hmael, Berzencze, and Jasmin. So good a ;thing, however, did the race seem for him that backers laid 6 to 4 on cheerfully; 7 to 1' being offered against itdelweiss, and 10 to 1 Hagioscope. When the numb.rs came in sight it was seen the struggle would be confined to the favouiite JidelweisH and Hagioscope. Archer, whowas riding the former, and Wood en Edelweiss, began to use their whips as they ascended the hill, but Hagioscope appeared to be going strongly and well. Opposite the Stand the northern horse drew out with a clear lead, and although the two crack jockeys worked hard at their mounts, neither could quite get up. and after a severe finish Hagioecopc beat Chippendale by a head, the same distance separating the latter from edelweiss. The bookmakers then went home to their teas jubilant, whilst backers relieved their feelings with bitter beer and bad language. On the last, day of the second October meeting the weather was as bad as . ever, and but for the Great Challenge Stakes, a well dowered race in which two-year-olds can meet the older champion over a short course,. but few would have stayed the afternoon out. The straggle, however, proved well worth watching ior. Tristan and Scobell (the former of course a hot favourite) weie opposed by the three-year-old Nellie, and three two-year-olds, the most n«table being Mr Crawford's 'Enery by Sterling-Cherry Duchess. To cut a long story short, the finish lay between Tristan, Scobell and Energy, the Jatter erentually getting home by a short head, Scobtll third. Nothing else of note occurred, save that Shrewsbury, with a big pull on the weights, managed to beat Dntch Oven for the Newmarket Derby, but as the mare was obviously suffering from her severe race on the Champion Stakes, the form is discredited. Shrewsbury, however, at once became a roaring hot favouiite for the Cambridgeshire, and the victories of Mr Crawford's bottes led to a tig outlay on behalf of Thebais.

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Bibliographic details

Sporting Notes from Home., Auckland Star, Volume XVI, Issue 3844, 9 December 1882, Supplement

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Sporting Notes from Home. Auckland Star, Volume XVI, Issue 3844, 9 December 1882, Supplement

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