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FRANKLIN NORTH NOMINATION.

The nomination of candidates for the Franklin North seat took place at noon to-day, at the Public Hall, OtahuUu. There were about 100 electors present. Major Harris and Mr Buckland were accommodated with seats on the platform. At 12 o'clock exactly Mr ThomaE Cottar, the Reuruing Officer, came forward, and said : — Electors of the district of Franklin .North. Gentlemen, I will first read you the gazette notice of my appointment (gazette notice read). As Eeturning Officer for this district I received, from the Clerk ot Writ'i the following document (writ read). That document was received by me on May 23rd last. As directed by law, I caused advertisements to be inserted in the tTAK, "Herald," and "Weekly News" (advertisements produced). Mr Cotter also read clauses 11 and 12 of the Regulation _of Elections Act concerning the qualification of candidates and nominators, and asked that none but duly qualified electors should take part in the proceedings. He then asked any duly qualified elector to nominate a candidate. Mr Solomon Cossey, sen., said that this was the second time lie had had the pleasure of nominating Benjamin Harris, Esq. He did so now with mo; c pleasure than on the previous occasion, because he thought he deserved it. (Hear, hear.) He hoped those who said " Hear, hear" would come and vote for Major Harris at the election on the 25th. He had known that gentleman for twenty-two years, and had founl him to be honest and upright in all his dealings, and he defied any man to say to the contrary. He believed they would carry the election 1 by a large majority, notwithstandingall that had been said to the contrary. Itwasmight against right, and he felt they had right on' their side. He felt it would be a serious loss to the 'country if Mr Buckland was returned (cheers and hisses). . Mr Smollett Reid said he had much pleasure in seconding the nomination. It was not the first time he had had the pleasure, On the first occasion he had been , doubtful of succes?, thinking that Harris did not possess the confidence of the electors. No such fear oppressed him this time, as lie felt sure of being on the winning side. He had for twenty-five years been mixed up with elections in. the province, so he was a bit of a prophet in such things. (Cheers). In 1863, when Harris was quite a lad, he had led his little troop further than General Cameron had done with his army. He liked a man with a bit ot pluck, though he had only one leg and a stick to stand on. He hoped they would not say they had a load of potatoes or a load of hay to take to town on the election day, but would turn out and vote for Major Hatris, (Choers.) Mr Samuel Andrew said in proposing Mr W. F. Buckland as a fit and proper person to represent them, he had an easy duty to perform, as Mr Buckland was thoroughly independent and candid, and was thoroughly fitted to represent an agricultural community. All knew that he would not go to Parliament either for pay or reward. They knew he would net bind nimself to factious opposition. (Bere ensued "considerable uproar.) If they would not allow a man to speak, it showed theie was a bit of cowardice behind. Ha wanted to see a fair fight, toe to toe, hand to hand, and heart to heart, Mr Buckland was an Auckland man, and had a thoroughly patriotic desire to represent the people amongst those whom he had passed his youth and his manhood. He sincerely believed that if he was placed in Parliament as their representative, they would eventually find that he was, the right man in the right place. lie trusted they would place him ot the head of the poll with an unmistakeablu and triumphant majority. Mr Caleb Mortis, who seconded the nomination, (aid that they hid found Harris wanting, and should send a better man to represeut them. The electors of Franklin had sont Harris along with Hamtin to represent them, and they had fonnd that he (Harris) wanted strength of character. He himself had admitted that. Had he not stated that he had been taken by the arm by a person to a place where ho did not want to go, (Cries of no, no.) He said that a person who was so weakmiuded was not fit to represent them, and should give place to a better man. Ho expressed a doubt as to the sincerity of Harris's promise to support the present Ministry, saying that the "fair trial " ho had promised the Whitaker Ministry would be siven before he landed in Wellington, asserted that Harris' answer concerning the education question had not been satisfactory He had promised to take the " sense ot the House," which meant that he would vote with the majority.—(Cries of no, and uproar. A voico : "This gentleman preaches the Gospel.") They needed a change for this reason • they wanted grants for road?, and in this matter had Harris done what a repiasentative should have done ? They wanted a man of more pertinacity — a man who would not be put aside. Harris bad showed that he was devoid of "push," and that he could be easily led by his co-oppositionists. Having been found wanting he should not stand in the way of a better man. He seconded Mr Buckland's nomination because ho felt that he had a weight with many members ot the House, and in sending him they would get a far more energetic man, a man who would make liib mark instead of a man who allowed himseif to be led where others chose, (cheers and groans). The Keturning Officer then invited farther nominations.

Mr William Moore proposed "Mr Gar rard, the agitator of Auckland, in preference to Mr Buckland."

Mr McUee said he regarded the nomination of Mr Garrard as a direct insult to the intelligence of the electors- ot Franklin North. (Cheers.)

The Returning Officer then invited tho candidates to speak, Major Harris satd he would be thoroughly gatished with the decieioa of the electors on the 16th, because be felt sure he would be, the person elected. He had received a very good character fr«m bis nominators and should .he ever have occasion to leave the province he would come to them for testimonials. He also thanked the propp.ser of Mr Bucklnnd, b«t he could not go the same ta his secondt r. That person did not know him (Harris) at all, which was a kind of apology for the attack. He could scarcely believe his ears when he heard the remarks of Isr Buckland's seconder, but in election tjmes he had f.ound he could hardly beliove either his eyes or his ears. He recommended his friend to give up either preaching or politics. Referring to an accusation of 'wasting the time of the 'House, the speaker said he was proud of the part be had played in the " stonewalling" on the Representation Bill, and, to prevent an i injustice being done, he would stop oat of - bed for weeks, if necessary, If he thought he was going to represent people who objected to tbe coarse he had adopted, he did not want to go at all. He asked them to judge by bis|past conduct ot bis ability to represent them, and at any rate he would not pull them through a Fatetere or a Piako. He would not drag them through a swamp. He would support Mr Whitaker in preference to a Southern man.—(Cheers.)

Mr Buckland, who promised to \>e brief, said whenever he attacked his opponent he alrrays struck out, and did not gp round insinuating. He employed 30 working men, but he had never asked them to vote, because he considered when the BUurage was given to them it should not have been taken before. They found that Harris was still a supporter of the Opposition. He referred to Harris's statement The question he was fighting was law and order against riot and confusion. That question Had run him'to the top of a house and kept him there all night, and when he heard about "the grand old man," he saw it cropping up again. On the last election,' when Harris' found he was gejng (o be beaten', he summoned the best jnan on the colony 10 help him. (The Return-, iiig Officer demanded it to be withdrawn). ; flic speaker withdrew the statement, and said that a paid whip could not do his party justice, (This had also to be withdrawn on the request of the Returning Officer,) Mr Buckland said lies I bad been coined against him, and he could say that he had never Baid anything against' his opponent,except on his public capacity. In conclusion he promised to support the present Government) and would fight for the district, the same as when he had unfair play at the last election. In answer to questions, Mr Buckland Baid that the lie) coined agairut him' had resulted inTiis benefit. He would'be inclined to support the1 amalgamated wisdom of the Road Boards on the point's raised in. the Local Government circular.' " ! .'■' ■ The show',of hands resulted: Harris, 2,7 ; Buckland, 25. ' ■■!•!' : •: ''- -■■• ' Mr Buckland demanded a poll,. A vote of thanlcs to the Returning' Officer brought the proceedings to a close.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18820609.2.30

Bibliographic details

FRANKLIN NORTH NOMINATION., Auckland Star, Volume XIII, Issue 3691, 9 June 1882

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FRANKLIN NORTH NOMINATION. Auckland Star, Volume XIII, Issue 3691, 9 June 1882

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