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DECLAMATIONS OF THE POLL.

WAITEMATA,

THE oflicial declaration of the poll for the district of Waitcmata was nlade at the Devonport Hall at 7 o'clock: last evening.

Mr Seaman, Returning Officer, said that he was not altogether satisfied with the result of the polling, for, notwithstanding that sixteen separate polling places bad been Established, and that them were 190$ electors 6a this roll, of which, 1494 coilld and should have voted, only 807 actually caino forward, Tlie remit of the polling was: For \V. J. Hurst, 566; for E. W. Alison, 241. Majority for the former, 325. He therefore declared Mr W, J. Hurst duly elected to represent the district of Wnitemata in the Parliament of New Zealand.

Mr Hurst rose to addreßS the meeting. He considered it a great honour to be the representative of such a largo and influential district as AVaiteinata. On auother occasion he would explain the cause of the small number of votes polled, but at the same time he thought country districts should be able to return a member with less people than town districts. During the election he had guarded himself against making allusions to his opponent, his only desire being to obtain the feeling of the people. He wished to return thanks to his supporters, and as tor those who opposed his election, he hoped that[bcforc the next parliamentary terra had expired, they would see that in the prcseut instance the majority had judged correctly. (Applause.) Mr Alison being absent, Mr Hurst moved a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, which having been duly accorded, Mr Seaman replied, stating that as far r a possible he had endeavoured to make the roll complete. He had consulted the Colonial Secretary a* to the subject of placing qualified persons on the roll without being requested to do so, aud was informed that it was his duty to make the roll as complete as possible.

This concluded the proceedings, and the electors dispersed.

FRANKLIN NOItTH.

The formal declaration of the poll for Fraukliu North took place this morning ia the Otahuhu Publio Hnll> between -10 and GO poisons being present, Mr W> Shsnaghau (Ke* ,qing Officei1) after opening the proceeding!) in dim form, announced the icmilt 01 the polling to haVe been as follows :— Uarrio. Huofc- Luko. Gordon. land, OtAhuhu.. ..83 101 103 7 MlUiKoro.. .. 15 58 1 — Howlok .... 62 32 10 1 Turanga.. ..3 8 7 — Papakura Valley 17 3 * — Wolroa .. 53 31 13 - Papakura -.. 62 fO 10 - Walheko.. ..3 19 1 - Totals .. 323 321 151 8 informal Votes: OUbUhu, 3; Msngore, 2; Howlolc, 2. I Majority for Harm, two votes. Ho . tbcretore declared Major Harris to be the | representative in Parliament for Franklin North. (Applause.) Major Harris thauked the electors sincerely for the position in which they had again placet! him. Yet lie was not so proud of the result as ho would bo it it had not meant that three other candidates had thus been placed lower than himself on the poll. For those gentlemen he had the greatest respect, and he would very much rather have fought three strangers than them. Ho claimed his return as a great victory. He had been closely ran, and if he had come out " right side uppermost" he bad to thank for it those true and staunch friends who, regardless of cither time or trouble, and, in many cases, regardless too of their own interests, had done as much for him as if he had been one of their nearest and dearest relatives. He was pleased to know that there were men go ardently devoted to the Liberal cause as to exert thernsclvoH so indefatigably for its furtherance. He thanked both those who had voted for him and those who voted against him, for the latter might be compared to the brake of a locomotive, and consequently had a very important i unction to perform. By looking sharply after the representative, they made him wireful of his actions in Parliament, obliged him to come before bis constituents frequently, and caused him to keep pace with the advancement of the times. He thought that hitherto he had kept pace with this advancement, and he accepted the renewed expression of their confidence in him as a proof that he thought aright. He hoped to be able to maintain that confidence, and that both friends and opponents wonld, during the next three years, give him a fair chance of worthily representing the district, by assisting him in everything which tended to the progress of the district. lie did nut blame the Otahuhu people for giving a preponderance of their votes to local candidates, for that was only natural, but he dirt ask them in case their feelings for him should change, not to pass votes of confidence in him, which would only serre to mislead him. He trusted that all differences caused by the contest would now be forgotten, and he promised that he would endeavour to gain the confidence, and merit the support ot every elector in the constituency. (Applause.) Mr H. S. Andrews returned thanks on behalf of Mr Buckland, who, he explained, was absent under the impression that the declaration of the poll was to take place at noun. He therefore begged (as Mr Buckj land's proposer) to thank the 321 free and independent electors who had voted for him, and in doing ao his only regret was that larger number* had not been polled, iiveiy man who had a claim to vote ought to register unless he was holt, lame or blind. The franchise had been placed in every man's handi as a trust, and he ought to hold it as a trustee, in order to register it for the candidate of his political choice. It did not matter much who went to Pat. liament at the present time, for there was really no particular line of demarcation. The whole thing was merely a scramble for the loaves and liahca. Aa long as tbis continued we would never have that political future before us, which was necessary to the true interests of a country. This election bad been carried on with tolerable fairness, and ho said emphatically that in this respect a step had been made in the right direction, for those who remembered previous elections would know that they were associated with much impersonation and wrong-doing. The severe scrutiny that had taken place this week shewed how fairly and straightfoiwardly the electors had voted. Mr Buckland no doubt would have well represented the district, but he supposed that the slight disparity between him and Major Harris on the poll showed that they wore much alike in point of merit. Mr S. Luke begged to thank most sin. cerely the 154 electors who had voted for him. It had been said that a prophet was not without honour except in his own country, but his case was an exception to such a rule, inasmuch as at Otahuhu, where he resided and was best known, he had stood the highest on the poll. He was proud of that face He wished to state that as far as he wap concerned, the election had been carried on in a straightforward and honest manner—on political principles alone-and that he had imported no personalities whatever into the contest. He regretted to say, however, that unworthy motives had been imputed to him, electioneering trickeries resorted to, and untruths circulated concerning him which w«ro anything but creditable to the parties chargeable with them. Still, as the election was o*er,he was concent that the dead past should be allowed to bury its dead. He was sorry that the Government had forced these elections, for ho had himself thought that they would take place in February, instead of in December, and he believed tbat fact accounted for the small proportion of votes which had been polled, 'ihe people were in the hayfields, and could not come out to vote. He had been told that if he had been out sooner he would have stood a better chance. He would take good care tbat he would be out soon enough next time, for it he had health and strength, he wonld assuredly contest Franklin Worth on the first opportunity that presented itself. He believed the electors ought to have a local resident as their representative. (Applause.) Mr John Gordon said that he had not many electors to thank for votes given him, bat to the few who had supported his candidature he tendered his bincere thanks for the trouble they had taken on his behalf. He could not say with tho Psalmist that " All men are liars," bat he did emphatically say that "Some men are liars." (Laughter.) Otherwise, his position on the poll would have been very different. It had been utterly impossible for him, however, to have got anything like a respectable number of votes, for he had not been able to tout and canvass for votes as others had. He had made it a practice never to buttonhole or cajole a man into giving him his vote, and he could assure the people that there would be less handshaking and fewer solicitous enquiries after their health now tbat the election was over than before. He utterly] and totally detested all such hypocrisy, and he would take care tbat he •

should never be guilty of anything of tho kind.. Of course the result of the ppllibg Was hia loss and perhaps the .district. gain, Ono .of the candidates bad taid that many untruths had been sold concerning him, und he him' self bad a similar complaint (0 make. Hi) would name one. It had been stated that he had gone into the County Council in order simply to bring the Act Into operation. The people making that statement.knew it to be absolutely Untrue, and one effect of it was that it had lost hint six or eight votes. There was one question—a matter of fact between himself and __ Luke—aßout which he wished to set himself tight. At Mr _.uke;_ first meeting, .he nsserted that the expenses of the Board of Edudatiqn amounted to less than £l,0(30 ahnnally, while at his own meeting, he (the speaker) had given them as £1,22113s 4d. The latter figures were those given in a return before him, while an additional sum of £203 8s 4d for clerical expenses brought the Co3t Up to and beyond £lt4oO. Therefore Mr Luke's claim thnt the Auckland Board was managed more inexpensively than any of the others was absolutely untrue, and the gentleman munfc have known it to be so. These expenses should be curtailed ■, and he hoped thfcir member Would sec to that matter. If there was any virtu, in the representative being a resident of the district, he would give them the benefit of it, for lie intended to oftor himself nfcaio, and he Would then Bee that not so much tlddlywinking or bamboozling went on as had taken place recently, Major Harris denied that during the contest he had asked for a single voiC) but he. had learnt a lesson, and meant to ask in the future-. The gentleman then, in a eulogistic speech, iilovod n vote of thanks to the Kcturnin? Officer, Mr Andrews seconded the motion, and in doini; so took occasion to characterise Mr Gordon's announcement that he would stand again after polling only 8 votes as a piece of ignorant presumption. If he could do anything ho would sec that Mr Gordon did not have so many ;ia 8 votes next time.

The motion was thuu piisecd with adcla< matiOD.

Mr Shariaghnn briefly returned thanks, nnd the assemblage disporscd.

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Bibliographic details

DECLAMATIONS OF THE POLL., Auckland Star, Volume XII, Issue 3544, 15 December 1881

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DECLAMATIONS OF THE POLL. Auckland Star, Volume XII, Issue 3544, 15 December 1881

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