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CITY NORTH.

Tho nominations for this constituency took placo at the Temperance Hall, Albertstreet. The Returning Officer, Mr R. C. Rawltnson, commenced the proceedings by reading tho Election Writ and the regulations relating to the cunduct of the meeting; and thcu called upon the.mover and seconder of the first candidate-.

Mr W. G. Garrard was nominated by Mr W. J. Johnson, and seconded by Mr Geo. Akor.i, who jumped on to the platform liko a deua ex machina, and took tho place of the selected seconder.

Mr Thos. Peacock was nominated by Mr Robert Bartley, and seconded by Mr D. C. Dougall, the latter of whom described Mr Poacock as possessing the hall-mark as a working-man's candidate. Mr H. Raf ton had great pleasure in nominating Mr Thos. Thwaites, an honest man and a real working man. It was necessary that labour should be represented by men engaged in it, The Grey Central Committee wcre|political cowards—(uproar)—in that they put up a Groyita to oppose a Grcyitc, instead of contesting Newton. They were traitors to the cause (commotion). Mr Peacock was not fit to preresentthe district, while Mr Bees was a land-jobber, and acting in opposition to the principles he professed, Mr Michael Cook seconded Mr Thwaites.

The mover of Mr W. L. Rees's candidature was Mr D. Dunningham, and the seconder Mr A. M. Williams, neither of whom made any remarks. The candidates then addressed the meet* ing in tiie order of their nomination. Mr Garrard, who was dressed for tho occasion and bedecked with medal?, commenced amid cries of •' Cut it short," and proceeded to speak on the question of employment for "the aged men of the Province of New Zealand." A late member said they must trust to the employers, but they had done that too long, mid what Was wanted was an Act passed to compel Employers to sympathise with aged men. The aristocracy down in Wellington would take the skin off their hided and send it up here to be made into hog-skin saddles. (Great laughter, and shouts of "Give it them.") They got sympathy from tho rich, but would sympathy pay house rent and settle bakers' and grocers' bills ? He had fanght for his Country and Wed for it. Mr Garrard then went on to allude in mysterious terms and amidst great confusion, to a Mr 8., and a certain £300, and though he expressed his ability (0 "spout for 16 hours" (A voice: "Say 60"), he scarcely made his meaning evident. The speaker then promised to give his full opinion of the Native Question, and then attacked the Lottery Bill, some parts of which wanted " revealing." He was in favour of taxing, and not allowing the money to leave the country. The last portion of Mr Garrard's oration was lost through the uproar and confusion at tho back of the hail.

Mr Peacock made a few observations, chiefly on the meaning of the term " working man." Mr Thwaites followed, and asked for the support of the working men. He said it lay with the working men themselves as to who should govern them, and whether capitalists and capital were any longer to rule.

Mr Bees then explained, in a vigorous speech, what weie his claims in support of a city constituency, and the reason why ho had come to opposo a Grcyite candidate. With regard to the first matter, he had once, absolutely by himself, obtained a vote of £50,000 for Auckland road boards and counties, a service for which he had never even been thanked. Kepljiog to the latter, ho stated that under party organisation it Was necessary to submit to orders, and the advico of friends. The inuendo of Mr Garrard respecting the £300 was the subject of an elaborate explanation, from which it appeared that it was obtained by himself (Mr Ruck) as a retainer on behalf of natives Whose lands and grievances were to come before a proposed commission. Various land speculations and transactions were then alluded to, and the speaker resumed ills seat amid applause. The question was then put to Mr Kecs, "Had you to withdraw your name from the East Coast Land Company in order to get it floated ?'' The reply was an emphatic denial. The show of hands resulted aa follows :— Garrard 9 Peacock 15 Thwaites 4 ! Kccs ... 40 to 50 A poll was then demanded for Mr Peacock and Mr Garrard. A vote of tnanks to the Returning Uflicor concluded the proceedings.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18811201.2.23.5

Bibliographic details

CITY NORTH., Auckland Star, Volume XII, Issue 3532, 1 December 1881

Word Count
747

CITY NORTH. Auckland Star, Volume XII, Issue 3532, 1 December 1881

Working