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Sporting Notes at Home.

(By Our Special Correspondent is London.)

London, Nov. 6th. Wiien last I wrote, Newmarket Second October Meeting was in course of progress, and Beaudesert had just won the Middle I ark Plate. Well, next day Lo. d Anglesey disposed of the colt to Lord Aliugton and Sir Frederick Johnston, th<; price paid being £7,000. This cannot be deemed by any means excessive. Petrarch, after carrying off the same event, fetched no less than £10,000, and Beandesett's prospects of victory in the Two Thousand Guineas and Derby are quite ks good as were those of Lord Dupplin's celebrity. He will in future be trained by John Porter at Kin«sclere, and exercised on the classic ground • where Blue Gown and Pero Gomez were prepared for their numerous triumphs. The Champion Stakes, a comparatively new race which is run across the Hat (1 mile 2 fur. 73yds), was the chief event of the Thursday on the Second October week. There were eight starters; the favourite turning up in iiayon DOr, who won very easily by six lengths from p'lacida and Exeter. Value of the stakes, £2,515. On the following afternoon the Le"cr winner was again pulled out to meet Lolly Pop in the Second Great Challenge Stakes (worth £1,117.) This event is only a six furlong scurry, and appeared a certainty for Lolly Pop, against whom the merest shade of odds (11 to 10) were obtainable Kayon DOrs price was 11 to 4; 6, 7, and 12 to 1 being laid against Placida, Parole and Discord, respectively. Lully Pop held the lead for a time, but was eventually caught by the French horse, who got iiome first by half a length, Placida winning third. Bayon DOr has won £15,000 iv stakes within the last six weeks, a fact which shows how valuable a good three year old is now-a-days.

DAVIES. THE LEVIATHAN,

About this time Davies, the Leivathan bookmaker, who twenty summers ago was as well-known as Itobert Lee is to-day passed away after along and painful illness' which had lasted a many years. From all accounts Davies must have been a wouderful man. In Teddington's years be made a £150,000 book on the Derby, and in 1856 he laid £100,000 to £1,000 in one bet against Vandermenlin, who started at 6 to 1. His integrity was unimpeachable, and his word as good as his bond. On one nccasionhavinglostabetamounting to£so 000 and thinking the winner might be nervous at such a large sum he walked up to him and handed out £12,000 in notes by way of deposit. Davis was the inventor of'list betting, and used to do an enormous business with the public over all big races. H c had a wonderful head for mathematics, ami directly the number of starters in a race was telegraphed, would calculate accurately what rates of odds he could afford to lay.

NORTHUMBERLAND AUTUMN PLATE.

Racing at Newcastle, Croydon, and Sandown Park filled up the week intervening between the Newmarket Second October and Houghton Meetings. The chief event at the northern city was the Northumberland Autumn Plate, for which the Ccsarewitch third Dresdon China (carrying Bst 121bs) started favourite in a field of five and won easily from Skelgate Maid 4yrs 7st 41 bs and Looking Glass Cyrs 7st 91bs. The betting was even on the favourites, 2 to 1 against Carrilor, 100 to 15 Pilchard, and 100 to 8 against Skelgate Maid, and Looking Glass.

MATTHEW DAWSON LIBELLED.

On Tuesday October 14th Mr Cox, proprietor of the ,c Licensed Victuallers' Gazette," was summoned at the instance of Matthew Dawson, Lord Falmouth's trainer, to account for a libel accusing him of hocussing Whcatear for the Cesarewitch of 1871. Ihe mare it will be remembered ran third for the St. Leger of. that year, and was afterwards a good favourite of the great Handicap at Newmarket, but failed to slay the course. The article complained of, contained the following aspersions:— "Mat Dawson, by a certain set of sporting writers, is lauded to the skies as the "immaculate" because Lord Falmouth, as the world sayt, never bets; and yet somehow we recall strange doings in Matthew Dawson's stable. How are Silvio's and Charibert's spring defeats and subsequent vicctorics to be reconciled V How is it the Heath House prominent favourites always go_ " cpieerly" in the market ? and, who inspires the clique of bookmakers who somehow smell from afar off whenever a catastrophe is 'imminent? We cannot truthfully write with a pen of honey about "the Dawsons." We can recaU ominous aud by no means pleasant facts in connection with them. We recollect a mare of Lord Falmouth's named Wheatear, who ran third for the Leger, and was first favourite for the Ce«arewitcU—we recollect her appearonco in that race, telling as it did too truthfully that " thfc doctor " had been at work. We recall to mind the money got out of her; we bring back to metnory her subsequent success, almost within a day or two of her Cesarewitch exhibition ; and as we think over and over again on the unpleasant affair, we wouder who pocketed the thousands for which the "gullible public" backed her. Wheel of Fortune's market position has beeu for a long time, to use a mild phrase, ominous; a certain clique have ever been ready ti> accommodate her backers for unlimited amounts—a clique distinguished for rather laying "dead meat " than Leger winners — and we feel assured she will eventually ba amongst " the dear departed " on Dnncaster Moor. We boldly say, if it is true that Lord Falmou h docs not bet, people " with an inspiration " get money out of tbe public from his horses, and the sooner the truth is solved tho bettor for all patties." Mr Cox pleaded that the article wa* published during his absence from home," and expressed himself willing to tender Dawson a public and ample apology. This, after some demur, was accepted.

THE CAMBRIDGESHIRE

Chippendale's Cesarewitch victory proved a very bad husiness indeed for the " swell 4ivision," and it was generally feared that several large accounts would be absent otf settling day. This, however, did not turn oat to he the case. Somehow or other tbe necessary ready money was forthcoming, and after a long business [day wagering began in earnest ou the Cambridegshirc. This is with the exception of the Liverpool Autumn Cup—the last big handicap of the year, and which invariably provokes tremendous speculation. Larger fortunes have been won over it than over any other race, bar the Derby. A commission of £1,000, properly worked will nearly always average at least 20 to 1, aud so. large are the books open that a horse may be backed to win over £20,000, and still stand at 25 to 1 oa the lists. The first move of importance this year was in favour of Ragman (3y*s, 6st 9lba), a stable companion of Rayon D'Or. Tho story went that there was only lOlbe between the two, which vaade it seem as if the race were at Ragman's mercy. His party piled the money on boldly, and in n very few days brought him to 5 to 1. Westbourne was second favorite for a time, bat ou the 13th Mr Gritton scratched him, and his place was taken by Harbinger (syra 7st 31bs) who belongs to the saiae gentleniau.aud ran for the last Royal Hunt Cup at Ascot. Exeter (7st 31bs), Lartington (7st 41bs), aud Leorille (fist 8lb), were also wellsupported during the week. On tho Thursday before the raoe scveraftrials took place, the most notable being Ragniau's, which he lost. Under ordinaiy circumstances the horse would have been driven to a long price, but so shady and equivocal are the doings of the French stable that the public declined to, believe the affair genuine, ami after a momentary re-action the colt again stood at the head of the quotations. Trials were also won by Leovillc and Out oi Bounds, both of whom were well backed. On comparing day, Lcoyille bceame became first favorite at 7 to J, Bjagman's price being Bto 1, and Excte^'a 10 to 1. Good business was done in favour of an old horse named Balbriggan (aged, 6st Slbs), who- has been a favourite for mauy races ia his i time, without ever proving successful. Still the party appealed very confident, and by dint of heavy outlays, brought him from 33 to 1 to, 100 to 7. Out of Bounds and Adamite had friends at the same price, and 1100 to 6 was chronicled several times on account of Discord and Flotsam. Harbinger, after being first favourite, retired to> i 25 to 1, and amongst the outsiders Rylstoue, • Jessio Agnes, and Fitz Plutus were in best I demand. A bogus telegram, announcing that LaHiogton had heen scratched, prevented his nam& being mentioned, but when the fraud was discovered, backers gladly accepted 10 to 1. The first day of Ne\yinarket Houghton meeting proved wet 'and miserable, and there were not a great many present to see the time - honoured" Criterion Stakes run. This race was won rather easily by Prestonpans, a colt by Prince Charlie, out of .Beatrice, who belongs to Lord Anglesey Count Lagrange's Dora, 9st., ran second and a German filly, Nereid, third. During the day the betting on the Cambridgeshirefluctuated considerably. Leoville, it ns true, stood firm at the head of the qawtations, hut both Ragman and Harbingerwere driven to long prices. Lartington w»* in good demaud, and there were occasional' inquiries for Lord Rosebery's pair, Rmddoroch and La Meryeilte. The merumg or the race brol^ bright and fair, so. thai?

numbers of Londoners went out of town to S ;e it run. Three o'clock was the hour fixed on for'its decision, but long before lhat time the jockeys were mounted and everything prepared. There were 31 runners, aud it nia.y be mentioned that this is the smallest field which has contested the Cambridgeshire since 1872, when Play Fair won for Mr Gretton. The largest complement of starters on record came to the post in 1862, when the speedy Bathilde beat 42 others. I append particulars :—■ The Cambridgeshire Stakes of 25sovs. each, 10ft., with 300 added; winners extra; second received 100 soys., and third saved her stake. Cambridgeshire Course (1 mile 240 yards). 123 subs. Lord Rosebery's b f La Merveille. by Blair Athol—Cauldron, 4yrs., Bst. Constable 1 Lord Anglesey's b c Caxtonian, 3yrs., 7st. 21bs., Cranham ... 2 Mr W. S. Crawford's eh f Out of Bounds, 3yrs.,7st. 61bs., (car7st. 91b5.,) Fordham ' ••■ "

Thirty-one ran. Betting 4 to 1 each against Lartington and Leoville, S to 1 Falmouth, 4 to 1 Flotsane, 100 to 8 Exeter, 100 to 7 Lord Clive, 100 to 6 Discord, 20 to 1 each Out of Bounds and Bagman, 25 to 1 each Adamite, Shylotes, Ballriggan, and Jessie Agues, 30 to 1 La Merveille, 50 to 1 each Bvlstoue and HarDinger, 66 to 1 Sunburn, Fitz Plutus, and Squeaker.

THE RACE,

There were not a few noteworthy features in connection with the race, which was run at a rare pace, thanks in the first place to Lartington, and subsequently to Sunburn, who came along from pillar to post all the way, and must thereby have cut his own throat, in a sense. At the Red Post he shot out with a clear lead of his field, and those who saw the struggle at that timehonoured site imagined that he was going to win easily, but he could not get home, and gradually came back to the three placed horses, of whom La Merveille looked like winniDg easily, but she, too, would have been better served with a shorter distance, and though Caxtonian and Out of Bounds hotli challenged most resolutely, they could neither of them get on terms with Lord Rosebery's filly, who won a magnificent race by a head, a similar distance seD.arating the second and tbird, while Sunburn was placed fourth. A length only in rear of Mr Crawford's mare, who, by the way, carried 3lb. overweight in order that Fordham should have the ride on her. Not for a moment do I imagine that the 31b. extra prevented Out of Bounds from winning, for this was surely more than counterbalanced by the skill and experience of her rider, but yet she must he described as unlucky not to have secured the great prize, as she was evidently interfered' with in the ding-dong struggle which resulted in the last two hundred yards, not only by Caxtonian but by the victor. Lord Rosebery is not a big winner by La Merveille's victory. He accepted a bet of £11,000 to 1,000 about his lot at Doncaster, and subsequently took several wagers of £1,000 to 30 about La Merveille, hut £15,000 is a comparatively small sum for an owner to win ou the Cambridgeshire, aud had the stable thought the gallant little mare could have got home under Sst. she would have started at 10 to 1 instead of 30 to 1. The public generally are heavy losers as not a single favourite being placed. Caxtonian had no price in the betting at the start; in fact 200 to 1 was fruitlessly tendered against him. If Lord Anglesey's colt had pulled thro' the ring would have been enormous winners ; as it is, they have done fairly well. The " prophets " were floored to a man, not a single writer even mentioning the winner. The Dewhurst Plate, a valuable two-year-old contest which since its inauguration in 1575 has been associated with the names of such celebrities as Kisber, Chamant, Pilgrimage, and Wheel of Fortune, was the chief event of'the day following the Cambridgeshire. Mr A. C. Barclay's Grace Cup who it will be remembered ran second in the Middle Park Plate was made favourite at even money in a field of a dozen, and justified her backers' faith by winning in a canter from Lord Falmouth's Ambassadress, and Count Lagrange's Dora. The best amongst the beaten lot were a French colt named Milan, and Abbot, a brother to Charon, who won the Brighton Cup some years ago. The only other events to which I need refer at this meeting are the Free Handicap for three-year-olds, in which Rayon DOr failed to concede 161bs to the Cesarewitch third. Out of Bounds, and the Jockey Club Cup were won by Jannette, who retires to the Stud full of honours.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18800109.2.17

Bibliographic details

Sporting Notes at Home., Auckland Star, Volume X, Issue 3033, 9 January 1880

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2,396

Sporting Notes at Home. Auckland Star, Volume X, Issue 3033, 9 January 1880

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