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English Sporting News.

BY "AUGUR."

THE first sporting event of importance after the departure of the February mail, was the Waterloo Cup.

The ' Derby of the Leash,' as it is called, is brought to an issue on the Altcar Plains, live miles from Liverpool, and the draw, preceded by a dinner, takes place at the Adelphi Hotel in that town.

Unusually large crowds assembled to view the coursing tlii* year, which was rendered extra-enjoyable by the bright pleasant spring weather which prevailed throughout the meeting. The betting fraternity were in great force,and must have done good business.

Waterloo Cup favourites are generally delusions, and those of 1877 proved no exceptions to the rule. Crack after crack went down in the first two rounds, and the event was finally won by an outsider, whose price on the night of the draw was 40 to 1. The only fancied candidate who did well was Mr. Briggs' nomination Braw Lass. The winner was Mr. R. (littus's Coomassie, a first year fawn bitch pup by Celebrated Queen. She weighs only -Mm, and Ims won twenty courses without suffering defeat. Her owner has refused £1000 for her, which an Australian sportsman offered after she had won the Cup.

Tlie runner up was the above referred Braw Lass, a black bitch pup by Blackburn—Happy Lass. The other dogs who did well at the meeting; were Poacher and Change, the winners of the Purse and Plate.

We have had cross country meetings at Sandown Park, Doncaster and Crvydon, but the only race I need refer to is the 'International' at the last-named reunion.

This is the greatest Hurdle Race of the year, and increases in popularity every anniversary. Live hundred pounds is added to a*sweep of 25 soys each, 10 forfeit, so that the stakes are well worth trs ing for. Directly the acceptances were made known, Broadswß was recognised as a ' good thing' by the pv.Vic, and Mr. Padwiek, his owner, evidently agreed, for he lumped down the money on him royally.

Woodcock was also heavily backed, despite his heavy weight, and Sir John Astley stood to win fifteen thousand on scamp. Ebor, Packington and Ingomar were also fancied by their respective friends. Hopbloom, after having held the position of second favouritcf or some time, wasscratched, the reason given being timt lie is a two stone worse horse throu'gl dirt than on dry ground. Industrious, the winner of this race, in 1875 bad the pen run through his name on the afternoon of the event. I will now append an abbreviated account of the race. BETTING AT THE START. 8 to 1. Broadside, 8 to 1 Scamp, 10 to 1 Miss Lizzie. 100 to <) Ebor, 15 to 1 Woodcock, 100 to b' Ingomar and Arbitrator, 20 to 1 Liberator. 25 to 1 Sir Hugh, 25 to 1 Bugle March. Lacy, Duplex, 50 to 1 the others, bar Lottery, who was not mentioned.

THE CROYDON INTERNATIONAL HURDLE RACE. Two miles and a half over nine flights of i hurdle... Sir J. D. Astley's Scamp, by the Rake—Lady' Sophie, (> yrs. list. 111b. (J. Adams)'.—l ; Sir J. L. Kaye's Lottery, 4 vis, lOst. 131b. (W. Reeves),—2 ; Lord Dupplin's Woodcock, 5 yrs. 12st, 41b. (Jones), —3. Nineteen ran. Won by eight lengths ; three lengths between second and third ; Brown Holland was fourth and Broadside fifth: Time 5 mm. lo sees: Value of Stakes £1,270. Broadside was never formidable, and it is clear his party must have made some terrible mistake over the trial. Sir Hugh was running well forward with the leaders, but fell at the last flight of hurdles, or he would probably have been amongfjt the three. Packington jumped nicely,but could not stay the c ursc. Ingomar was overpowered by the weight he carried, so was Woodcock, who did extremely well, 12st. 41bconsidered. Liberator should be dangerous in the Grand National. He has not been seen at his best yet. Everyone was pleased at Sir John Astley's success. With such a horse as Scamp in his stables, he will probably find cross country work more to his taste than flat racing henceforth. THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS. The result of the races for the Guineas at Newmarket will, I suppose, be telegraphed to your part of the world about the middle of May. It may therefore not be out of place for me to say a few words as to the probable competitions. The Two Thousand Guineas is ran over a straight course known as the Rowley Mile. It is the first ' classic' event of the year, and provokes nearly as much interest and speculation as the Derby itself. The value iof the stakes this year will exceed £500. j The winner is almost invariably made first I favourite for the 'blue riband,'and although very few horses have compassed the double event, it generally happens that the Two Thousand winner is amongst the first four at Epsom. On paper it seems as though the Guineas of 1877 must be won by the favourite Chamant. He has wintered well, and, as far as we can tell, bis most formidable opponents (whom he will now meet on equal terms) are tre same horses to whom he gave 71b and a beating last autumn. We know of old, however, that racing'certainties' are not always to be depended upon, and personally I would much rather take 7tol about Lady Golightly (with a start) than 5t02 about the favourite. The Russley stable is sure to be formidable in the Two Thousand, and from the state of the market I conclude that Pellegrino,whose price is 5 to 1 will be called upon to do battle for the Westminster 'yellow and black.' Actaeon is reported lame, and Morier inferior.

Pellegrino by the Palmer—Lady Audley (by Macaroni) made his dfebut at Goodwood in a race won by Shillelagh. He ran third, and his trainer expressed himself satisfied with this performance as he was only half trained. His second and last appearance was in the Middle Park Plate, which, with. Chamant out of the way, he would have won. To he first in the Two Thousand he should be a 71b better horse than he was last year. Lord Falmouth has several horses engaged, and it is difficult to say which will run. Lady Golightly seems the most likely candidate, but it is possible she may be reserved for the One Thousand. If this is so, I opine that either Silvio or Queen's Messengerwill be Archer's mount. Lady Golightly by King Tom —Lady Coventry ran 8 times as a two-year-old, scoring five victories she is a great leathering filly, nearly 16 hands, and should be extremely dangerous in whatever races she starts for, having wintered well and being quite aonnd. Her most notable victories were the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket July Meeting, and the Champague Stakes at Doncaster. Two of the defeats she suffered were almost victories. In the July Stakes, Warren Hastings beat her only by a short head,and in the Middle Park Plate, when carrying a penalty, she was within a lenth of the winner.

On more than one occasion whilst a twoyear old Chamant suffered defeat from this filly, and I think it quite on the cardsthat she will beat them again. Mr Baltazzi, the owner of Kisber, possesses a fair chance of of repeating last year's successes Avith Plunger, by Adventurer Lina. This colt made his first appearance in a sweepstake at Doncaster, which he won, Chamant bfiin» amongst those behind him. In the Middle Park and Dewhurst Plates, the Frenchman reversed this form decisively, but it spite of this, Plunger has plenty of backers.

Warren Hastings, by Citadel Plunder, the winner of the July Stakes, was (last season), as far as looks are concerned, by far the handsomest colt of his year. _ His Derby chancers, in my opii i >n, super;'or to his Two Thousand chance, thougn nothing would surprise me less than than to hear of his carrying off the double event. His breeding, is uot very lasLionable, u:it lie uas shewn fair capabilities, and a private friend assures me he is a great horse

Silvio, by Blair Athol, Silverhair, Lord Falmouth's second string, won the Clearwell Stakes with tolerable ease, and may, I for all I know, be a good horse. If, however, 1 were asked to place the first three in the Two Thousand Guineas, I | should plump for Lady Golightly, awarding Charaaut,, and Warren Hastings, the J second and third places. For the Derby, Chamant is in strong de- | nmnd at 5 to I,'and Rob Roy finds plenty of hackers at 12 to 1 ; Rosbach, Touchet, j Pelligrino, and Plunger are also sometimes j inquired after. . j Before the departure of the next mail, i the Lincolnshire Handicap and Grand National Steeplechase will have been brought to an issue. Petrarch has been knocked about in the market in a most re- j markable manner, but finally has recovered ! his position, and is first favourite for the ' Lincoln at 7to 1. Touchet and Midlothian arc next in demand, their prices being 10 to 1 and 10) to 8. PoiiDttivant, wh ,it issaid, j has lost his trial, is nevertheless, . aeked at ■. 100 to (J, and several others find at outside I prices. The Grand National betting is almost a dead letter. Quotations are few and far between,but this, lam told, is owing to the fact that the race is looked upon as a a gift j to Slufual. 7to 1 Shifnal ;15to 1 Citizen ; | 100 to 6 Palm ; 20 to 1 Austerlitz, repro- j seats the present wagering. James Suarry, a well-known character on Northern race-courses, who was stud groom to the late Sir Tatton Sykes, is dead. He owned that game little mare Lily Agnes, who won him many a good race.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18770512.2.5

Bibliographic details

English Sporting News., Auckland Star, Volume VIII, Issue 2241, 12 May 1877

Word Count
1,633

English Sporting News. Auckland Star, Volume VIII, Issue 2241, 12 May 1877

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