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The Evening Star. WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED The Evening News," "The Morning News," and "The Echo."

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1876

For the cause that lacks assistance, For the wrong that, needs resistance, For the future in the distance, And the good that we can do.

Mb William Buckland's nomination for Franklin yesterday was an inglorious one, and we have no doubt he heartily regretted having invited the expression of feeling which followed his proposal by Mr Every McLean, whose personal influence and plaintive appeal on behalf of "an old settler" did not prevent the manifestation of marked disapproval from all parts of the hall. Mr Buckland, it appears, was nominated merely that he might make an attack upon Sir George Grey and then retire back into his shell This is the second occasion upon which this very manly and spirited policy has been pursued, and each time the absence of Sir George Grey could be "calculated on to a nicety. Of course we do not say that it was so calculated on. Sir George might have been there had he chosen ; no doubt Mr Buckland at Otahuhu and Mr James Mackay, jun., at the Thames fully expected his presence When the little arrangement was devised and were grievously disappointed that he did not put in an appearance, that they might have shewn him up, but as he didn't come, of course they couldn't help it. -We would j however, remind those gentlemen that in none of his many public utterances has Sir George Grey ever abused public confidence by making personal attacks upon members of the Assembly. That he has spoken, and spoken strongly, against the principles involved in such legislation as the Indemnity Bill and such dealings, with the public estate as the Piako swamp and Tairua transactions is true, but he has ever preserved the dignity of a ttue statesman in refraining from reducing great questions to the level of personal recrimination and abuse. There is a very wide distinction here which other public men might mark with advantage. We do not for a moment intend to say that Messrs. Mackay and Buckland are other than great and good men, who will be estimated at their true worth by generations to come, but unfortunately this perverse generation, in its infatuation for Sir George Grey, will think that if Mr. Mackay had had nothing to do with the issue of those miners' rights at Ohinemuri ; if he had in no way been connected with the sale to private parties of the timber, water, and all important rights over Tairua, and with the purchase of the valueless fee simple of the soil at a singularly good price by the Government ; if he had been disconnected with other transactions in native lands where the Government got decidedly the worst of • the bargain ; he could have spoken so very much more effectively and so much more disinterestedly against Sir George Grey than Ihe did. We admit this is all the prejudice of a vulgar populace of " blind and.raad" electors, |but

then even prejudices must be respected, i And Mr Buckland likewise. How much better his onslaught at Otahuhu yesterday would have told had he retained possession of his excellent bargain in land purchasing and not sold it at cost price for a paltry £2,625 to the Government; or if that stupid committee had not reported a sale where the colony was so manifestly the gainer, a breach of the spirit of the Disqualification Act if not of the letter ; and if the expiring Assembly had not found it necessary to pass a law virtually saying " We'll indemnify you for what you have done, but if ever it occurs again look out." The bill, Mr Buckland has told the electors, was for another man, and we believe him ; and another man besides that ; yet people will say that Mr Buckland's disapproval of Sir George Grey's politics looks so very much as if it were wholly grounded in little differences of opinion such as these, that really it were better not paraded in public. Not for Mr Buckland's sake, by no means, but for the sake of Sir George ! We are sorry that Mr Buckland should have terminated his public-spirited and states-man-like address by retiring.; there again, people will say he acted cowardly. The opportunity for testing his late constituents' feelings on these questions, and of showing how completely they endorsed h_3 every sentiment of yesterday ; how they delighted in Mr Buckland and abhorred that meddling Sir George Grey; was so good that Mr Buckland should not have withdrawn. Moreover, he promised that if Mr Lusk came out nothing should hold him back, and yet he retired. Why, we know not. If the electors are "blind and mad" enough to accept Mr Joseph May, surely there was hope for Mr Buckland, who has at least vindicated his ability to take c_.re of himself, if not of his constituents. After seeking nomination, how much more graceful Mr Buckland's retirement would have been after he had headed the poll. This course is so palpably the proper one that Mr Buckland's hasty retirement must surely have been a pet at the unfriendly behaviour of those Otahuhu electors. We really hope he will be able to devise a means of re-considering his decision, and of backing his words with deeds, and then we shall see what we shall see.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED The Evening News," "The Morning News," and "The Echo." TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1876, Auckland Star, Volume VII, Issue 1841, 11 January 1876

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The Evening Star. WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED The Evening News," "The Morning News," and "The Echo." TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1876 Auckland Star, Volume VII, Issue 1841, 11 January 1876

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