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The Evening Star: WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED "The Evening News", "The Morning News," and "The Echo."

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1875

For the cause that lacks assistance, For the wrong that needi resistance, For the future" in the distance. And the good that we can do.

The result of City East Election affords a convincing proof of the strong feeling existing in the city in favour of Sir George Grey. It is admitted on all sides that no man in Auckland could have been brought out for that constituency more likely to receive a wide support and prove a formidable opponent than Mr J. M. Clark. Personally very popular, connected with City East by many special ties, admittedly a shrewd business man of unquestioned integrity, and coming forward for a commercial constituency, supported by all the Government votes and influence, and yet nofc holding such extreme views as to absolutely alienate from him personal friends who were also supporters of the Grey party, we know of no one whose chances against Mr Rees could for one moment be compared with those of Mr Clark. Had we placed out of view the political creed of the two candidates and compared them purely in relation to their claims upon City East, we should have been led to regard Mr Rees's chances of election as exceedingly small. Posses3iu ,' none of the business connections and personal associations of Mr Clark, Mr Rees has also, by hi 3 keen, outspoken attacks created many bitter foes among those whose monetary influence ia by no means inconsiderable, while Mr Clark has probably not a single enemy either among his political supporters or opponents. Moreover, Mr Clark's party were influential, well-organised, and worked with extraordinary energy. On the morning of the polling we were assured by the Crpss that Mr - Clark's active committee numbered "forty steady and influential citizens," " all reliant men," whose final comparison of notes and examination of the roll and " returns produced shewed that Mr Clark's election was safe by a large majority." Without looking at the subject through the Cross's magnifying glass, it is unquestionable that a large proportion of Mr. Clark's best supporters were active workers ; there were also included among the number many firm believers in the policy of Sir George Grey, thus partly dividing that party, and, in short, his canvass and election work were conducted with such energy and system that we firmly believe not twenty votes which would have been recorded in his favour, remained unpolled. We are thus driven to the conclusion —an opinion which was repeatedly statedfby adepts in these matters—that if Mr Rees had possessed an equal number of good workers and a like vigour and system in carrying, on election operations, he might have polled another hundred votes out of the unrecorded balance on the roll. The result, striking as it is, only fulfils our anticipations. Mr Clark, we' have throughout maintained, was badly advised in coming out for Oity East, in view of the challenge thrown down by Mr Reea and many times repeated, to the late member. He was likewise placed in an unfavourable light with the public owing to the

~nown connection of many ol Lid leading supporters with the Government party, but, above all, his very qualified declaration of support to Sir George Grey and his toleration of a Ministry, notoriously corrupt, arbitrary in its dealings, and unjust to Auckland beyond all the Ministries that have ruled "N6w Zealand, were extremely distasteful to the popular mind. The struggle is over, and Mr Clark is defeated, but we are certain that if the people of -Auckland glory in the'triumnh of that cause which they love and see embodied in Mr Rees, th;;y will think none the less of the candid and straightforward, though ill-advised, contest carried on by Mr Clark, and they will hail with pleasure the day—and come it assuredly shall— when Mr Clark's natural instincts and good judgment bring his whole heart into the popular cause.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18751231.2.7

Bibliographic details

The Evening Star: WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED "The Evening News", "The Morning News," and "The Echo." FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1875, Auckland Star, Volume VI, Issue 1832, 31 December 1875

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The Evening Star: WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED "The Evening News", "The Morning News," and "The Echo." FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1875 Auckland Star, Volume VI, Issue 1832, 31 December 1875

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