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Tx a late edition of the Star last night, we published a special telegram announcing that the boundaries of the Thames goldfields h;jd been extended by proclamation intheGont-ral Government Gazele so as to include 100,000 acres of land, mostly owned by the Crown, and hitherto outside the goirlfields area. The boundaries of this block are desctibed in the proclamation published in our advertising columns. The addition ha? been made in order \o bring within the goldfield the country around Tairua. It is well known that the whole Coromandel peninsula from Cape Colville to Aroha is more or less gold-bearing, and the raDges at the back of Tairua present such geological features as led Messrs Preece and Graham to the conclusion that goldbearing lodes would be found there With the view of testing the question they employed a prospector, whoa fhnrfc timo ago was successful in discovering a w<-11-d< fined re>f. About fifty pound* of qtnrtz from this reef were taken to Grahamstown and crushed at one of the batteries, giving a handsome yield. The matter had been kept quiet in order that the discoverer's rights might not be vitiated by a premature disclosure. But we believe that wince the proclamation the prospectors claim and another have been pegged off Messrs. Preece, Howard and Co., the owners of the land on which the find has been made, have, in anticipation of a rush, taken the Effort off the Ohinemuri trade and sent her round to Tairua. In a special telegram from our Grahamstown correspondent, all that is definitely known regarding this new discovery is told. AYe have not the slightest doubt that new discoveries such as the one just reported will be made at different periods for years to come along the rough unexplored country of the Coromandel peninsula, and we cannot but regard with the greatest satisfaction those additions to the gold-producing resources of our province.

A social gathering of friends of the Park Road Mutual Improvement Association w.<s held lost evening in the Graftcn Road Diht'ict School, in aid of the funds of the society. Th«re was a good audience, and the songs, dialogues, aud readings were evidently appreciated.

The second Sunday evening lecture on the prophetical portion of the Apocalypse will be given to-morrow night by the Rev Dr. Wailis, who announces as the subject the second and third seals—the red horse, to the rider of which was given power to take peace from the earth, that they should kill one another, and the black horse, with a rider who held a pair of balances in his hand.

We learn that Mr Watson of the Thames, who obtained the contract for renewing another section of the -wharf has failed to execute the necessary bond, and a speoial meetrag of the Board is convened for Monday next to consider the other tenders.

A very handsome embossed memorial card of the late John Williamson has been prepared. The card bears the following appropriate lines :—

He gave his honors to the world again, His blessed part to Heaven, and slept in peace

A mi, to add greater honors to his age Than man could give him, he died fearing—God

The Committee of V.M.C. Association has lost none of its activity. A week ago Mr Dennes gave, in aid of the Society, a limelight exhibition, which was well received by the public, the proceeds of which the Committee at once laid out in a new lot of books, a list of which we now call attention to in another column. This list adds some excellent and eagerly looked for volumes to the library. We would only add, that for an outlay of 2a. 6d., three months' reading in this excellent library may be enjoyed.

We notice that the Rev. W. A- Cathcart who has recently arrived in this country from (Scotland, will conduct Divine service to-morrow morning in the Presbyterian Church, North Shore.

We would draw special attention to the announcement of the anniversary services at the Piimitive Methodist Church, EJwardtsstreet, to-morrow. In the morning the service will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Wallis, and in the evening by the Rev. S. Edgar, B. A. The annual tea meeting takes place on Tuesday next, when various ministers and friends will address the meeting. This being the day fixed upon for the marriage of Mr J. McCosh Clark in the city of Melbourne, the house of Messrs Clark and Son waa closed in order to give their employees and friends an opportunity of being merry on the happy occasion at the expense of the firm. Accordingly, the "Scotsman" was engaged, and at niue o'clock this morning she received on board at the Breakwater, the gentlemen of Messrs Oiai k's establishment, tueir sweethearts and wives, numbering about one hundred persons, aud proceeded gaily, with music aud baiiueis tv Moiotapu, where the party had proposed to celebrate tho wedding by a picnic aud dance under the trees. Mr W right's band was in attendance and played several lively airs at Blarting; also Mr Canning, of Queen-street, with a plentiful supply o£ reireshments. As the day has proved favourable, the party, no doubt, have enjoyed the trip on the water, and the rustic festivities and aoenery of the island.

Sir Samuel Baker, in his new volume of African adventure, tells us of the notable effect of music upon the natives. "I believe," he says, " a London organ-grinder could march through Central Africa followed by an admiring crowd."

In our report of the Hamilton concert there appeared three printer's mistakes as fellows : First—Mi3S Sage is the correct name ; Page is wrong. Second - " Finest lathering," not "First." Third —Evening's entertainment, not "English."

Mr Joseph Pridmore has called to say that the report of a, quarrel between Mrs Tigbe md his daughter Fanny, was not of sose<ioua nature as was reprpsented iv thu report of Thursday. It appears that it was a repititinn of "much ado about nothing," and that Mrs Tighe did but give Fanny a punch ■n the back, for which sha has to pay £1, that is, Is fine and 19-t costs. We learn that Mr Tighe is on what may prove his deathbed, and she has eight young children to support. When this fact was made known to Mr Beckham, he kindly allowed time for the poor woman to pay the fine, and expressed regret that a cross-action had not been brought to have enabled him to bind VTrs Fridmo-e over to keep the peace. Mr Pridmore was the peace-maker, and was exonerated by the Court.

The inhabitants of Clarence-street, Ponsonby, like the people of other localities, have suffered in consequence of a scarcity of water. There was one well, however, which seemed to promise a moderate supply until the coming of the rain. Thr-ir hopes, however, were yesterday blighted by the wilful act of a boy who attends to several cows which have a character for intruding into their neighbouring gardens. The lad had been reprimanded for his negligence, and to avenge himself he has been at the trouble to nearly till up the well with a quantity of dirt and filth, and hss thus deprived the people of Clarence of water from this public well. The young cow-herd deserves a whipping.

Among the many new buildings which have recently sprung up, and which have tended so much to improve Queen-street, none present a nobler appearance than the line of new shops leading from the Bank corner of Wyndham-street, and conspicuous amongst these is the house of Messrs. Phillipps and Son. These gentlemen, who, for twenty years, have steadily reared a successful business in the oil, colour, glaes, and paperhanging trades, have just removed from Wyndham-street to their finished warehouses in Queen-street, which are amply fibted up with every convenience for carrying on the various departments of their extensive trade. The first floor (of large dimensions) is devoted to an immense stock of paperhangings of every colour and pattern. There are also neat business offices. Another room is reserved for oili, white-lead, colou-s, paints, brushrs, and trade sundries. There are al^o separate floors for storage of various-kinds, and one large room entirely reserved for plate glass, with machinery and facilities for cutting and removing the same, with commodious back premises for tho reception of goods, with a crane for lifting heavy packages in and out of the several storeys. The stores of Messrs. Phillpips are really worth a visit ; the very sight of them tends to strengthen faith in the future of tho colony. On one side of the lower office we noticed a beautifully stained g'ass door, quite a novrlty, wi-,h its rainbow hues ; also, a fine gallery of chromo-lithographs, photographs, and other pictures, which have attracted a large amount of public attention. Many of thess pictures are from the pencils of such famous nrfint.H as Kowbottom, Birkefc Foster, Wainwright. Pr-nley, and other English limners It would be superfluous to attempt a description of these really beautiful works of art, which include a series by that gifted Indy Miss Edwards ;as fries by Foster, from beneath the green hills of Surrey, where the artist resides. Hence we were not surprised to find among his collection "A Cottage in Surrey," " Children Gathering Flowers neir Oodaltnins»," and the " Pathway Style " Other pictures by other hands depicted the fir-it " Napoleon in Egypt," "Grace Darling in the Storm,'' and iiumerous otiier illustrations of sea and land. As new buildings rise upon the ashes of the past to adorn and beautify the outer aspects of the city, so we trust in like ratio trade and labour will advance, andcontribntejypt mnre to th^ comfort and happintS3 of the people of these colonies.

The boot and shoe maker's connected with the boot factories of Auckland, some time -ince, formed themselves into a protective association, and on Monday evening next, they will hold a meeting in the Wellesleystreet Institute for the general business of the Society. We learn that there are hundreds of men belonging to the gentle craft in the city, but whether they are such public spirited men as one of their order, James Lackington, described them to be, remains to be seen, we are not aware that we have any remarkable shoemakers amongst us, although we have many good shoemakers who silently protest against the introduction of asphalte. This Society of Crispinians was established chiefly for mutual benefit in times of sicknesss rather than as a political or trade union, and in this respect it is praiseworthy and laudable. The nature of the craft formerly was conducive of habits of self-culture and the expression of the poetic faculty ; but the introduction of machinery has scattered the elements of poesy, and the modern shoemaker is no longer a visionary but a scientific worker in leather.

Services will be held in the Primitive Methodist Church, Edwardes-street, mowing and evening ; and Newmarket Primitive Methodist Churcb, afternoon and evening.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18750410.2.8

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume VI, Issue 1609, 10 April 1875

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1,818

Auckland Star Auckland Star, Volume VI, Issue 1609, 10 April 1875

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