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ANCHOVIES AND-TOAST.

: [From our London Correspondent.] j. .' . THE DEATk OF SHIRLEYBBOOKS will be a considerable;.^ to .fj-jf^ ' light literature; He was one of:«*SgJ ■ witty set which mcluded ajj.^gj'. Dickens, Lemon, Thackeray, s&s&;■ Smith, Jerrold, Leech, and Gilbert S ft . not:one of whom, as Dicken■f-J^. marked shortly before his deatt, «—g^ the, age of 60 years. Brook* * at i the time of his deam ■ hfl some other writers, of began life in a iawyer^o^ce,.,^^^ forsook a business he disliked, *gjj*.-. journalism and play wnhng.- ■» • . liamentary summary writer tor w^,, Chronicle in its palmy days. ** of several novels, including, ~^£ Cord, « The Gordian Knot," " The SjJ* _ and « Sooner or Later," and hfe *«,^ W tributor of those sketchy^ artic^^ Illustrated News under theieadoi in the Papers," and ''/^Kp^H When Mark Lemon died he «" .- Editor of Punch, ' the politics of thatpubhcatioQ H ate Radicalism to Ujtraconserja^ j^ was a genial soul, and looked »£jjto* <■ reaUy was. His *^"%£S».M r the literary talent of the -«jSw'Wjs ' understood that he is to be fm^hio^ Percival Leigh, who has long be?" t with the Punch staff. ■ ■' ■ : : ■ ! i,,'^^ . mozENMEAT.y gome. _.., : mutton «>a V? itr'?s%*<**> A■ , I

—"""TTmeftts. The first'experiment and the fresn . gnccesgfu j j an( j jf fag is ~, has therefore De 3d> fow i s afc ;. 2s , ■ UrM ffl°^- njf4 s there will be no difficulty r and turkeys a* > amount of Transylvanian 'in disposing°ty gt we have been in t he i0($l „? consuming ptarmigan, which haoic oi from orwa y i n ice, and are sect ovei for the}r e x Ce llence Icanpersonauy. are much cheaper when cooJie° n(i I have been going in for than f me' Serable extent. them to a consider pASTBGHNIC!ON O ?^T5 wrote to you the Pantechnicon Smoe J I n£« been destroyed by fire, and *£tZZS^ worth property has Bullions of be kHownwhat has belL hPPii the loss, which must be regarded r^J' be«» ™° a c suc h a number of works IDft1 Dft of priceless value have been con--0 a nm. of the most melancholy losses ? nit'si?steined by Sir Garnet'Wolseley, \l h£ JbSent on the Ashantee expedition, n- had oft his departure, deposited the .)S o ££. V«U «-° 1-™ been Allowed up in *he general ruin. Picsinslv many thousands of tores wortn siugij j ™fa by some of the greatest masters, G P erilbed...JeweUery of fabulous Sue has been melted down and disappeared in the chaos. There are few of .our Seat families who have not sustained Lses The London season not having commpnee'd" most of the furniture and works.of S£ S of the West End mansions were stored in the Pantechnicon, which was helieved to be fire-proof, and which was constrncted after a wondrous fashion, with endll iron bulkheads and floors. The fire Commenced in the interior It is not known how • but it is helieved that some ladies who had 'been inside inspecting their property must have carelessly thrown down an ignited match Some large insurances were effected on some of.-the goods; but unfortunately every one saems to have felt so secure in the fire-proof building that ia many cases people were not insured at all, and in others for a mere trifle. Hundreds of private carriages perished in the flames. DEATH OF YOLTIGETJB. Pacing circles have been stirred to the depths of their sentimentalities by the demise of that wonderful horse, Voltigeur, which occurred at Aske, in Yorkshire, the seat of the Earl of Zetland a few days since. His remainb were interred on the lawn at Aske Hall, and the earl is going to erect a grand monument- to the memory of a horse, who,, aa a .three-year old, accomplished so many brilliant turf achievements. His death was occasioned by a kick from a mare, which" fractured his near hind thigh, and he had to be destroyed. Voltigeur was bred in 1847 by Mr R, Richardson, of Hart, in Yorkshire, and he won the Derby in 1850, beating a field of 24. He also won the St. leger of that" year, and the Doncaster Cap, beating Hying Dutchman. The Dutchman beat him _as a four-year-old at York the following year, and he afterwards suffered another defeat on the'same course. He was sire of some splendid racers, and was a great pet of the late Lord Zetland, who scarcely ever missed a day without visiting this horse that had won hiWf such; turf honours. - - DEMAND FOR FLAX. There is a great demand for flax just now in the English market, and it seems to be generally believed that the Irish, as well as , European supplies will not be anything like ' ipto the necessary orders. If this be so, the New Zealand flax trade should feel some tailus this year, which I hope will be the case, for the phormium seems to have establiiied a hard-won reputation at last. : DEATH OF DE. BINJOtY. Drßinney, the great Nonconformist divine, died on the on the 24th of last month. He lad for a long time been suffering from severe mess. He was in his 75th year, and had spent more than 40 years of his life in London. He was a North-country man, being s native of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and from the earliest days of his ministration made his mark in the religious world. Both in America and in Australia he did much to disseminate his views. His visit to Australia was in 1857, and he then engaged in a correspondence with the Bishop of Adelaide concerning communion between churchmen and dissenters, which excited a good deal of attention at home and abroad. INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL MATCH. 4 I had the curiosity to go and see the great International Football Match, which came off at Kennington Oval a few days since, and, althongh the .weather was most dismal and damp, there was a large crowd of spectators", including" many leaders^ The match was one of a series which commenced j& 1871, on which first occasion at Edinburgh tne Scotchman won by a goal and a try to »try. In 1872, at London, the Englishmen Were victorious by two goals," and a try to one goal. Last year at Edinburgh there was a drawn battle, and this year orjee more the Jtoglish were left masters of the field. The Bontherners wore white jerseys, with a rose and brown stockings, and the Scotcnmen blue f!T a thistle an<i scarlet stockings ; »ut the ground was sloppy, and, in about ten ™Mtes, the combatants were such a mass of Was to render all uniforms indistinguish- ? B«v 1 notice that there is very little kickmto what used to prevail in old days. »Ie great object seems to be to get hold of the , and keep it so long as possible. This ™Wts m an y amount of struggling, and'even |BBng, but the absence of kicking prevents aerious bruises and bone-breakings which tormerly to accompany these romps. THE AMEUICAN WORLD FAIR. . : ifiere is to be a Paris exhibition next year, »nri%- OT-Iv mentarenofc Soing to take I'tttri^i^^Pl^^ll^ Palais de of h^T at the dlsP°sal of tnf proprietors lid •e> as.the y 4° not feel themselves ttEi n-S^ endl mgmoileyson sucb- things ifew'«, T^ lkiDg Of editions »" CWt hat Government have Fair»fv°reco^ Isetoe*America^ " Worlds »mSI c?' aDd merely a private spec. after X B{\ me to be, weak, because T all'^ese exhibitions, 0;^ 6^186 ' but h **« adver'

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18740508.2.12

Bibliographic details

ANCHOVIES AND-TOAST., Auckland Star, Volume V, Issue 1326, 8 May 1874

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ANCHOVIES AND-TOAST. Auckland Star, Volume V, Issue 1326, 8 May 1874

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