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ANCHOVIES AND TOAST;

Or, Home Jottings by our London

Correspondent.

Slmul et jucunda et idonea dlcere vitas A Hena negolia centum Per caput et circhmsaliunt latun.

AUSTRALIAN CUSTOMS BILL,

I suppose the fact of the passing of the Australian Colonies (Customs Duties) Bill will be gratifying to you all, as it will enable your rulers to play all tlie extraordinary experiments thoy may desire with jour fiscal arrangements. When tho Bill came on for its second reading in the House of Lords it met with some opposition, amongst others from Earl Grey, who said that in committee he should move that New Zealand be omitted from the operation of the Bill. The Time* stated in a leader on the following day that it was of opinion that the effect of the measure, if passed, would be injurious, since it would tend to encourage those wild notions about protection in which colonial statesmen had lately so freely indulged. In committee Earl Grey brought forward his threatened motion, and argued at considerable length that colonial statesmen who appeared ignorant of the most elementary principles of political economy should not be allowed to take a step so much at variance with the general good as to make fiscal arrangements adverse to British industry. The Earl of Belmore said that if New Zealand were struck out of the Bill it would lead to a great deal of very unpleasant feeling in the colony, and would be very unwise. Lord Lisgar said that pasI sing the Bill without New Zealand would be I like playing Hamlet without the Prince of | Denmark. He thought there was no fear of ! protectionist measures becoming general in j tbe colonies. Lord Kimberley allowed the i measure was of moment, but hoped its im- v portance would not be exaggerated. It was doing no more for tho Australian than it had done for the North American colonies, when Earl Grey was head of the Colonial Oflice. In 1850 the Canadian Legislature had passed such a measure, which Lord Grey did not disallow, and he did not think that any statesman but Lord Grey would have selected the present occasion for a stubborn resistance to the wishes of tho colonists. DISESTABLISHMENT OP THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND. The defeat of Mr Miall and tho disestablishment of tho Church of England party wps a tremendous victory for the Church and State people. At the same time it- is scarcely likely that the extremely sudden conversion of the liberal side to the Church side will bo forgotten at the next elections. CRUISB OF Till! ROSAUIO. Captain Markbam's lately published volume containing a detailed account of his last cruise in the Eosario amongst the Islands of the South Western Pacific nas been well received and favourably noticed. Of late years these islands have supplied materials fop a good deal of literature. There have been Captain Palmer's book, South Sea Bubbles, In Quest of Coolies, the cruise of the Curacoa, and the work spoken of as above; all these are readable and supply a great lot of information never before printed. CONTAGIOUS DISEASE ACT. I alluded to the Contagious Diseases Repeal Act in my last letter. It is not a very savoury subject to write upon, and I am not going to do more than tell you that it was defeated by a majority of 123, a decision greatly to the credit of the sense of the House, and it is to be hoped fiual as regards all agitation on the subject. THE DERBY DAY. Perhaps the most striking spectacle for the eyes of a new arrival in England is London on Epsom Downs on the Derby day. Qn Wednesday last that great event of the year came off, and I was informed by old. Itabitues that the crowd was much larger than they had ever before seen it. To me who had witnessed nothing of the kind for a series of years the scene both on the road and on the Downs was truly wonderful. The road was one continuous mass of vehicles, of every description, from the costermonger's donkey-cart to the four-in-hand drag. And very surprising it was that so few accidents took place under the circumstances. A few of the extemporised conveyances came to grief occasionally, but few people were hurt, aud I believe there were only two fatal accidents. It seemed to me that, like the boat race and a good many other Buch occasions of immense assemblages, the race was merely the excuse for the holiday. London was comparatively deserted, for the time being, and every one was trying for a few hours to forget as much as possible its toils ahd dirt. For my own part I may say that I completely succeeded, and in the company of two or three friends whose faces would not be very strange in Queen-street^ I made a grand day of;it. The weather was glorious. The morning was showery, just sufficient to lay the dust and keep the turf in nice order. The airgwas cool and breezy, and the sun broke out between the showers in all its power. I won't bore you with a description of the road or the racecourse because it has been done so well and so often, and all the papers have gone in for that sort of thing to an amazing' extent. The Prince of Wales, who has usually gone by road, went to Epsom by rail on this occasion. He, the Duke of Edinburgh, 1 rince Arthur, his cousin Count Gleichcn and suite went by rail in a special train from Victoria station. The Duke and Duchess of Teck took the road in an open landau. The Royal party were loudly cheered as they took th^ir places on the Stewwd'* Stwid to Witness the 94th Derby, -y'^

THE QUEAT EVENT. It was three o'clock before the dozen of I horses coloured on tbe card left the paddock. Eight or nine out of the twelve were really first-class animals, and perhaps nothing looked better' than Hochstapler or Kaiser as the horses walked past the Grand and the favourite, Mr Crawfurd's Gang Forward The quarter-of-an-hour had and J « sooner were the animals m line ?ban the starter got them off beautifully. A better finish for any race could not be teen ; any one of the four-Doncaster, Gang Forward, Kaiser, and Suleiman, having the thing in hand less than 50 yards from the winning post. Mr Merry's colt, Doncaster however, came in'cleverly by a length and a-half and there was a dead heat between Kaiser and Gang Forward for second place. The race was run in 2 minutes 50 seconds. A great cheer arose from the ring when it was known that Mr Merry had won. The betting at starting was 9 to 4 against Gang Forward, 4 to 1 against Kaiser, 20 to 1 against Suleiman, and 40 to 1 against Doncaster. Mr Merry won the Derby in 1860 with Thormanby, and has been rather unfortunate since that year. This last victory was very popular, and Mr Merry received the personal congratulations of the Duke of Edinburgh, to whom he was introduced by the Duke of Cambridge. The winner was pulled up quite fresh, and moved away after the unsaddling as if nothing particular had occurred. Doncaster is a chesnut colt by Stockwell, out of Marigold by Teddington— sister to Singapore, by Eatan (bred by Sir Tatton Sykes.) He was ridden by F. Webb. Mr Crawfurd's Gang Forward is also a chesnut by Stockwell, out of Lady Mary, by Orlando. Mr Savile's Kaiser is a bay, by Skirnisher, out of Eegina; and Suleiman, belonging to Mr F. Gretton, is also a bay, by Kni"ht, of the Crescent out of Queen of Prussia 0 The nett value of the stakes was £4,825

BISHOP SUTER IN LONDON.

I dare say most of you remember the Bishop of Nelson (Suter) when he arrived first in the colony. He was a man who was sure to make his mark anywhere, and he was an excellent speaker. He astonishedj some of the members of the Anglican Synod in no small degree by opposing on some points his opinion to the experience of their primate, Selwyn. He is now at home, and has already made the fact known. He holds as pronounced opinions as ever, and will do the colony a great deal of good by his truthful and at the same time favourable report of its condition. His speech at the annual meeting of the Colonial and Continental Church Society was a very able effort of its kind, and he placed before bis audience a view of the condition of the colony which I am convinced was new to them. He said amongst other things that before going out to New Zealand he had no conception of the vast progress made by all the colonies in civilization. This was hardly to be wondered at, for since my arrival here I have been asked the most extraordinary questions as to the manners and customs of the good people of Auckland, and the ordinary prevailing notion appears to be that you live in wigwams, clothe in frieze, and eat like cannibals. The notion of the " bush" haa been so written and dinned into the English mind that a notion prevails that being in the colonies and in the bush is synonymous. On this ground it is that uninformed persons excuse the monstrous ignorance of the Wagga Wagga Tichborne. They imagine that having |been some years in the colonies he has been for so longcut off from aUameliorating ahd civilising influences that he has forgotten everything he ever knew. Eeverting to Bishop Suter's speech, ho said also, "Persons in England sometimes speak as if the colonists would put up with ministers who would not do for this country. Now remember what Samuel Pepys said when Dr Bates and other eminent men were turned out of the church in his day. He said. ' I hope the Government will send us good meu, for bpd men will not go down in the city. Read colony for city, and that is true at the present time. 5" He went on to discourage the idea of people of bad character emigrating in the hope that their antecedents would not be known in the colony, saying that quite the contrary was ahyays the case. He also showed what a mistake was the sending out of young men who were rather fast, saying that "wild oats produced a much larger crop in- the colonies than here." He also showed how it was that the clergy in the colonies were obliged to look to the Society in question for assistance. It was, he said, in consequence of the rapid change of population which was continually taking place in all colonial towns which occasioned parishioners to be strangers to the long and laborious services of their pastors, and so they were not willing to supply funds as they would be had they been permanent residents. After eulogising the Church Missionary Society and the work effected by it in the colony, which some of us colonists may perhaps not quite believe in, the Bishop said he regretted to say " that some of the men who had been sent out as ministers (not by the Society) having previously had a most excellent character, had appeared to change that charaster on the seas."

THE TICHBORNE TRTA"L

Is improving in interest, and every one is on needless to know what the defence of the claimant willbe. Dr. Kinealy, his counsel, has done nothing in cross-examination whatever except make one or two attempts to show that the witnesses for the prosecution had been indirectly bribed, in which he has most signally failed. On the contrary the surprise of every -one lies in the fact that people can ' have been found to give up so much of their valuable time for so little remuneration as in most instances they are receiving. Up to the present time the progress of the trial may thus be summarised :—The opening speech of Mr Hawkins occupied between five and six days, the reading of the defendant's examination took up twelve days, th« rest of the time has been occupied by oral evidence. Altogether sixty-seven witnesses have been examined. The evidence has ranged itself under several distinct heads—Paris, Stoneyhurst, the army, Ireland, the English family, life of Rpger, South America and Australia. As to the Paris life of Roger six witnesses have been examined—-Chatillon and his wife, DjAranza Gossen, the Abb 6 Lefevre and the Abbe" Salis, to whom may be added the Abb<* Toursel as to the early English life of Roger. As to Stonyhurst two, Sir J. Lawson and Mr Mannock. As to' the army, Gibbeshas proved a declaration by the defendant that he was only in it a few days, and was never an officer, and this evidence was confirmed by Cubitt. As to Ireland, Lady C. Whebbe has been examined. As to South Aae ica, Captain Oates, who saw Roger on board the Bella, has been examined. Of these witnesses ten have sworn that the defendant is not Tichborne. Then nine or ten witnesses have been examined from Australia— Gibbes, Cubitt, Hawkes, Howwood, Miller, Smith, Telfer, Hodson and Mrs Mina Jury, and of these several swore that the defendant was Orton. Then there vwere thirty-four witnesses from Wapping who Jh*vs also sworn he is Ortoh. Altogether forty-two have so sworn, and thus upwards <*' fifty Mvo woxn he tei|ot Roger Tichborne,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS18730812.2.8

Bibliographic details

ANCHOVIES AND TOAST;, Auckland Star, Volume IV, Issue 1109, 12 August 1873

Word Count
2,258

ANCHOVIES AND TOAST; Auckland Star, Volume IV, Issue 1109, 12 August 1873

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