Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1916. GERMANY'S CAMPAIGN OF INTIMIDATION.

In estimating the amount spent in Germany's world-wide campaign of intimidation, pursuasion, and bribery to enlist the aid of neutrals in the great war, Mr John L. Balderston, the. special correspondent in Europe for the Pittsburg "Dispatch," estimates that the amount spent by Berlin

in propaganda work is at least £72,600,000, including remarkable "traced items" as harems for Persian potentates.

German propaganda, says Mr Balderston, is being carried on with feverish energy in fifteen neutral countries. In two other countries—Turkey and Bulgaria —the game has been won. In Italy it has been lost. There are three weapons wielded by Prussia in this world-wide campaign—intimidation, pursuasion, and bribery. The tactics used in each country areva.ried according to conditions obtaining there. The three weapons of the pro-

pagandists are being used in 15 neutral countries for three "different reasons. Those three

aims of the German propaganda to a large extent overlap, but,

broadly speaking, German aims in her campaign- of more or less "peaceful penetration" are summed up as follows:—

Countries Germany is trying to win as active allies: Roumania, Greece, Persia, and Sweden.

Countries Germany is trying to keep from joining the Allies: Koumania and Greece.

Countries Germany seeks to influence for commercial reasons: All the foregoing, Holland, Switzerland, Norway, Denmark, Spain, China, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and the United States.

In the case of the United States the only neutral exporting munitions, an additional motive comes in—the hope of stopping- this traffic.

Germany, in pursuading, • intimidating, and bribing Italy, Turkey,' Bulgaria, and the fifteen countries where the effort continues, has spent not less than ' £72,600,000. This gigantic sum with which Germany could maintain the war three weeks, is a minimum figure arrived at by obtaining an estimate from, an authority on the spot of the amount known to have been disbursed in each country since the beginning of the war.

Where the Money Went. Following are the estimated expenditures in each country where German agents have been at work :— > U.S.A. £15,000,000 Turkey 14,000,000 Italy 10,000,000 Bulgaria 5,000,000 Greece' 4,000,000 China 4,000,000 Sweden 3,000,000 | Roumania 3,000,000 Persia 3,000,000 ' Spain 3,000,000 Holland 2,000,000 Norway 1,600,000 Denmark 1,000,000 Switzerland 1,000,000 Argentina 1,000,000 Brazil 1,000,000 Chile 600,000 Peru 400,000

Total £72,600,000 The moderation of the estimate that only £15,000,000 has been spent in influencing the United States l —a figure half or one-third that often mentioned in America—-is also characteristic of the other estimates, all of which are probably too low, since they deal only with expenditures which have been traced or have produced observable results, such as harems for Persian potentates or palaces for Chinese mandarins or motor-cars for poor Greek lawyers who happen to be members of Parliament on the King's side.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19160404.2.5

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1916. GERMANY'S CAMPAIGN OF INTIMIDATION., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3533, 4 April 1916

Word Count
461

The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1916. GERMANY'S CAMPAIGN OF INTIMIDATION. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3533, 4 April 1916

Working