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The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1916.

GERMANY'S FOOD SUPPLY.

One ul the grea> difficulties the 1 Allies have had to face in this war is an estimate of the true condition of internal Germany, •while the Germans can estimate exactly how all matters stand with us- They .know the prices

ji our food, our munitions output, our number of recruits as oon as Britishers do; because our newspapers are taken into Germany and read there extensively. The wild statements in 'he Northcliffe Press have given ren pleasure to the Gcrm.Tis in Je.j\i;i, as showing how divided •i nation we British are. Fortunately little reliance can be placed on the statements of the "Daily Mail", "Globe", etc. In Germany where the papers have been commandeered by the Military no indication can be gained of the state of the country. The question which has been concerning the Allies most is the amount of food supplies Germany has. There is little doubt that the pressure from within will do as much as the pressure from without in ending this war for Germany,' In the history of Germany \t is interesting to note that the great French historian. DeTocqville, whose work on the French revolution lis the standard one takes Gcr- | many n« the other country whose evolution be works out I alongside that of France. He proves quite conclusively that in 11789 tbe Germau peasantry were 'ircaled m a worsft manner than the French and that their conditions of life were more difficult to bear. He a&yx that it is a, popular error to conceive the French Revolution as coming from the bad treatment of the

peasantry as in that case why should not the Germans who were treated in a worse manner have risen and slaughtered the i nobles. According to De Tocquejville it was the sudden realiz*jation of their evil condition, ; brought home to them by Rousseau which precipitated the Revolution. In Germany, he says*, the peasantry have worked on with their conditions gradually improving; so that there has been no ftjar of a terrible class war. It would seem that" Germany is reserved for a struggle just as terrible as that of the French in 1789, the war between the military and civilian classes. The bulk of the people have been coerced well and most of them no doubt bear all the miseries of' war buoyed up with the reports in their papers of Germany's great victories. However, the day must come when the true position is realized and the military • class will find an angry populace to deal with. In England it may be said that the poor people are better off than usual. All can obtain work, and if prices of food are high, wages are higher than usual. That Germany in

spite of her boast that she is a self supporting country is feel-

ing the blockade, is shown by the following extx-acts from German prisoners taken by the French in Alsace tu\d reproduced by Mr H. Warner Allen, the representative of the British Press with the

French Army. J Willingen, December 12.—The :<--d ">'.s has given up distribut; ■ .if.; r .'■■; to the women. 4t was the only thing we had left, and •-.' w i must buy it, for I can't de-.';-ive the children. Charlottenburg, Berlin, December 14.—The servant's life is now terribly hard. She has to wait literally three or four hours' at the milk shop, and in the end she will get only a quarter of a pound of batter. Every day it is a different shop that has butter, and we never know at what time it will e arrive, so we have to wait there indefinately. If only there was margarine.

Cologne, December 11.—Eggs are too dear, and everything is beyond.all reason in price. There are too many people waiting and not enough milk shops open, so we have to wait for hours' in the, rain and snow.

Glanchen, December 4.—We are now eating mainly potatoes and honey. There is very little butter. There are no vegetables.

Uudated.—l wanted to send you butter, lard, or bacon, but it is impossible to find any.

Kisselwarden, October 2.—Rice costs 1/- per ' lb, oatmeal lOd. Life is no longer possible; things are getting worse. No place, December 15.—For eight weeks I have been unable to get any fat. It is terribly scarce. If there is any in a shop you have literally to fight for it, the crowd is so thick.

Tangstedt, ' September. 26 — I am thinking of killing the pig before Christmas, for we are longing for meat, and cannot buy any.

Tangstedt, September . 26. — Yesterday I went to the wife of the Privy Councillor and she gave me a sausage, and milk tickets for three weeks.

Undated. —Life is impossible, Pork costs 1/9 a pound, and flour 6d.

No Place, November 8. —The price of pork has been fixed at 1/5 a pound. It is impossible to get any, either for love or money

Yolk, October 29.—1t is no longer possible to buy meal for the pigs.

X Koberg, December 3.—A1l the pigs are unfattened, as it is impossible to buy meal.

No place, November 3.—We have killed' our pig without fattening it, for there is no grain to feed the animals.

In the neighbourhood of the towns, and in many of the villages, there seems to be a great scarcity of potatoes. 1 Official prices have been fixed for them, but they appear to be disregarded. As far back as last April five marks were paid for 50 lbs;"" -■ : -r-\r- ■■-.■-- —;■ •;

No Place, December 18.— Things cannot go on like this. We have no more potatoes, as the growers are keeping them. The police have already commandeered a large quantity.

No Place or Date. v-Wc cannot keep up our strength on dry bread and, potatoes. However, we are now better off, as since November 1 our allowance has been increased by seven marks a month.

Tangstedt, October 29.—We have potatoes, and that is the principal thing. God grant that we do not die of starvation. Without the Government allowance one has to go hungry and barefoot.

Berlin, December s.—ln Berlin there is nothing that money can buy—no more food, no more milk eggs cost 40pf (nearly sd) each.

Bremen, December 6. —We car get petrol only once a month Butter, eggs, and soap are practically unobtainable.

No Place, October 18.—We car think ourselves lucky to have electric light. Everyone else has to live in the dark, for there if no paraffin, and a candle costs3d. Forst, December s.—Freda has come back from Berlin. The factories have no coal. Businessis very bad.'

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19160310.2.4

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1916., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3526, 10 March 1916

Word Count
1,108

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1916. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3526, 10 March 1916

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