Hi folks. Complete the Papers Past survey to let us know what you’d like added over the next few years. ×
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

A TEUTONIC BLUNDER.

CON-

r- spiMtOrs

Writing, on the subject of the Hamburg-America , conspiracy trial, the New York correspondent of the "Central News" says:—

"Teutonic thoroughness of tail, of which a (great deal is being heard" just now, was at fault in one instance brought out by the evidence offered on the last day of the Governmenl/s case. It appears that when the accused German citizens chartered and sent forth from Philadelphia the" Steamship Unita, laden with supplies for German war-

ships—all of which the defence

conceded—they overlooked the detail that the skipper of the Unita was a loyal British subject. Doubtless the name' of the Unita's captain, Emil Olsen, had misled them. Olsen was born in Norway, but many years ago was naturalised in Canada. ';When the Unita started from Philadelphia-he* was told he was to clear for Cadiz, with his cargo, but as soon as the Delaware Capes had been passed a Ham- , biirg-A?nerica supercargo, who had corrVe, aboard with a letter directing the skipper to obey the supercargo's instructions, told that what he really was supposed to do was-to coal and supply German warships on the high' seas. "

Nothing doing, I told the supercargo,' said Captain Olsen in his evidence, whidh' caused much. laughter in Court." So the supercargo offered me 500 dollars toj change my course; Nothing doing—nothing doing •- for a million dollars. The thifd j day but he offered me 10,000 dollars. NoJ;hingv.tk!ing.: So I called the Unita to Cadiz, and after we got Inhere I*spki the cargo, and then looked up the British Consul.

"Defending counsel suggested that the supercargo thought Olsen ym , a Norwegian or a Swede, and picked the wrong ma?n to betray his' country for 10,000 dollars. 'He sure' did,' bellowed the skipper."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19160229.2.25

Bibliographic details

A TEUTONIC BLUNDER., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3526, 29 February 1916

Word Count
292

A TEUTONIC BLUNDER. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3526, 29 February 1916

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working