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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1916 AMERICA AND THE ALLIES.

It baa been stated many times that it would cot benefit the Allies at all were America to join tbe lists against Germany and Austria. America has DO standing army of any size, and b) r fleet is very inconsiderable. Also it is maintained tb*t being a great Deutr&l

nation America can act as mediator in many disputes, holding tbo hi lance between the belligeren'e Oo tbo othor band America's intervention would have been an enormous help to the Allies. She has vast financial resources as well as a large population This population 13 made up of a big | percentage of Germans, and tbsa fact helps to debar the declaration of war, as President Wilson is plainly] cowed by tbe pro German party. There is no doubt that w&re Mr Rooseveldt in power America would have been fighting on the side of the Allies long before now. Tbe remark is often made tbat President Wilson i-> not to blameā€”he is wise to keep his oonntry out of such a terrible war. Arguing in this manner Great Britian should have sat down and watched Belgium and Franca being robbed praotically of national existence. America bas not only kept out of troubles incidental to participation in such a conflict, but has also reaped an enormous benefit financially by her extended trade. She has been able to loan out moneys to the belligerents at her own terms, and has placed the dollar at the head of the financial world. Great Britain has placeda striot blockade on all trading with tbe enemy Germany bas now made approaches to America informing her that she will discontinue her sub-

marine piracy, and suggesting trade should be interchanged as before President Wilson is reported to be eomtemplating a demand upon Great Britain that in view of this statement the blockade should be withdrawn. The mind of the Allies is becoming mora and more determined, and in England suggestions are being made tbat America should be reminded that Great Britain bas a fleet. If America joined Germany and Austria it would prolong tbe present struggle, and a conflict with our American cousins would be like a terrible family quarrel. At tbe same time the feeling with the Allies appears to be tbat rather than remove the blockade, and give Germany assistance in materials the Allies would take on America 'as another belligerent. It would seem tbat America must accept the dictum of the Allies and, having avoided tbe conflict so long, she will hardly be drawn into the war now even tbongb she runs the risk of losing trade.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19160118.2.5

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1916 AMERICA AND THE ALLIES., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3514, 18 January 1916

Word Count
442

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1916 AMERICA AND THE ALLIES. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3514, 18 January 1916

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