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LAKE COLERIDGE ELECTRICITY.

ITS EXTENSION TO THE PENINSULA.

MR BIRKS IN EASTERN BAYS

Although apparently nothing has been done recently to further tbe above object, there has been steady progress made since Mr Birks last visited Banks Peninsula some months ago. The Akaroa County Council have since that time mora carefully analysed the prospects of carrying the scheme to a workable and successful issue, and with the help of Mr Arthur Goodwin, of i'igeon Bay, whose energy in this matter has done a great deal to bring the scheme to its present half matured state, the County Council have come to the conclusion that the connecting up of tbe Peninsula ia quite a feasible proposition. This much has been done since Mr Birks was last here. He has put tbe Peninsula claim before the Government Electrical Department, and they have authorised him to proceed with his negotiations. The Akaroa County Council, knowing Mr A. Goodwin's

m i iny year.-**' experience of eiect-rio lighting and telephone matters, asked him to investigate the possible cost of re'ic'ra'ing the di£far**-_t, biys, and although ho hn no - yet. been able to give an absolutely concrete osr.imatp of mnning the-jo wi'-en, yet, be ha-* m_B it o'ear than the 00->t of erecting the branch Hues to the bays and the reticulation of the bay 3is not going to be such a costly matter as was first supposed. Mr Goodwin has also been waiting tbe completion of the Tai

Tanu installation which will be simi

lar to our own. He has arranged to ■•* take representatives from each part of -♦the district to inspect the Tai Tapu installation, so that they can see what oan be done in a scattered district to provide light and power. Mr Goodwin has propo"ed to the Council that thpy should have an application form printed and circulated through tbe Peninsula, which will contain the pro viso that if the County Council will supply current for power and lighting at certain prices for the different uses to which tbe current can bo put, will the applicant agree to take so much light and power. This information is very necessary, as upon it hang** the whole futuro of tbe scheme. If the residents of the Peninsula guarantee to take a sufficient amount of current to justify the capital outlay of the connecting lines, then tbe whole undertaking becomes plain sailing Tbe County Council will also have to prepare an accurate estimate of the Peninsula reticulation, and according to the County Chairman's statement an expert will be employed to go into it very shortly, while the P iblic Works Department will also obtain an es*i mate of the cost of their main trans mission wire from Gebbie'a Valley to Akaroa. I he Wairewa County Coun oil should also be approached to take similar steps so tbat the consumption from this main trunk line will justify its construction by tbe Department, and lessen the whole burden of capital Outlay. When all these figures are available, viz, tbe visible oo sumption and the cost of reticulation, then the County Councils can put tbe proposition before their ratepayers in the form of a loan proposal, which can be either accepted or rejected. It seems that now is the Peninsula's oppor tunity to draw upon tbe Government's eleotrical scheme, and it would be the greatest pity if they let it slip from their hands TOUR OF EASTERN BAYS. To furtbe" the interest in tbe u"p of electricity and to demonstrate what its great benefits ore likely to be to Peninsula householders, Mr L. Birks made a tour of the Eastern Bays last week end Tbe interest shown was fairly encnurfigirg, hot, of course, it i*> very bard without any definite pro posal to put be f rare tbe hearers tn iv any way guaee the extent to which flectricitv will be uskl. But tbo in terest shown in the fcbeme by men such as Messrs A. Goodwin, J D. Bruce. H W. Piper, and E Hay, all of whom thoroughly understand the great convenience of light and power, as they have used it for a number of j years, should greatly encourage fcbe Peninsula people in accepting their assurance of Ihe very great benefits it will, it is hoped, bestow upon tbe district. -trict. These men are well known to Peninsula residents, and tbey must know that if they did not thoroughly understand what it will mean to Pen insula residents tbey would not waste tbeir time in advocating it. In fact, the whole district is deeply indebted to them for fathering tbe scheme Messrs A. Goodwin and E. Hay very kindly placed their motor cars at the disposal of Ihe party, snd with Messrs Thacker Broß , of Okain's Bay, enter tamed tbem during tbe tour at their midences at Pigeon Bay. Tbo party were, with the assistance of Mr Good win's fine Vauxhall and Mr E. Hay's splendid little Fiat, able to cover a lot of ground, and visit Little Akaloa, Le Bon's Biy, Pigeon Bay and Okain's Bay, where addresses were given. Mrs. Birks and Mios Luke of Welling ton accompanied tbe party

Tho whole arrangements wero in the hands of Mr A. Goodwin, and the whole programme of tbe tour was carried out without a hitch except at Le -_n's Buy, where, unfortunately, Mr Goodwin's message did not reach the proper course, and only the Road Boar! members were present.

Mil BIUK-' ADDRESS The chief features iD Mr Birkp' add'ms-* are given helow. Mr J. D Bruce, Akaroa County chairman, iky. d sn chair man at each meeting. Hh pninttd nut that the County Council would undertake the reticula lion and buy the current wholesale from the Government. The main line would be constructed by the Government to Akaroa, and the revenue received by the County would be divided by the County and th© i Government in a proportion to be ' arranged later The support given the scheme would have to pay interest and linking fund on the County loan necessary to do the reticulation, and the proportion the Government took nf tbe revenue would repay them for their outlay in the main line and for the current supplied to tbe district. Tbe chairman said as far as possible the pooling system would be carried out in reppecfc to the reticulation in the different bays so that the residents living some way from the branch lines would b9 on the same footing as tho?o living closer at hand. Mr Birks as cured him that the scheme would become a payable or. a if half then sidents in the district took the power and light, and the charge for the current would be on the same basis as the Akaroa charges. From his own experience he knew that the cost of current at Akaroa was about the same as the cost of kerosene. He pointed out tho vast superiority in the electric light and the great conveni ence of it.

Mr Birks said so far the Govern ment had gone into only one of the farming district, with Lake Coleridge current, and it bad proved a great comfort nnd convenience there, Tbis was at Tai Tapu, and Hororata was seeking a similar installation. Wb__ he first heard of tha Peninsula pro posal he thought it was hopeless. The Peninsula people had, however, shown such energy in investigating the scheme that he believed it was quite possible now. Electricity was a great convenienc?and not a luxury. It might not be cheaper than kerosene lamps and candles, but. it was clean an' saved endless inconvenience. In the coun try tbe saving of firing would be a big consideration".- The lighting alone would justify the Lake Coleridge rcbeme, but, the electric iron at £1 pdi* year was worth pounds in any household In the hot summer wea'.hor the fi'-e bad to be kept going *<ll day for the ironing;, ond it wa> Hone under digressing inconv.-nience Wi'.h the electric ion nil you had to do was to switch on tbe current and you could commence a* once.- There were a number of other appliance? r-quii'-y as useful. There wn*> ibe o-ioki'g on'fi'*. A man in Chri-t church bnd recently errcted i< hr-u,- wi'h jinfc one fireplnc**. in il; Mis whole electrical on*fit co j t him £17, and wi'b it bp del bis ironing, cooking, lighting, and bedroom bear, ing. He c-iiild rmike hia toist on t bp tablo clean hi*, house with bis sweeper and f-y on his hot plate, .to That was a tyficil electrically equipped house He waa able to do away with tbe cost of a chimney, stove, mantlepiwee, &3 , which c >st at least £35 to erect. In another house there wa* a hob water system now by electric beating. The electric ovens could be regulated to nicety. The current could ba switch.d on, and the oven left until tbe dinner was cooked. The beat never-varied, and thus the cook ing was done by a regular heat. The electric kettle wa3 also a great labour saver. The use of the motor an the farm was as convenient as the light and other appliances. In the Tai Tapu district two girls milked a dairy of fifty cows with ease The motors could be Used for wood cutting shearing machines, and'other farm pur poses. He pointed out the present illogicil method of sweeping a house The broom did not get one tenth of the dirt, whereas the suction sweeper sucked up every particle of dirt and did away with spring cleaning The Department would erect Ihe high tension wire through to Akaroa with a capacity of 11,000 volts, and break it down by means of transfer mers to 8000 volte, where the branch lines went to the bays, The County Council would have to undertake tbe rest of the reticulation, though the Department might be able to erect the

I lines to tbe bay?. He thought the cost of the whole reticulation would be between £5000 and.£lo,ooo The rough cost of the different appliances would be as follows :—£l per year for 50c p lamp, 10-i for 250 p, £12 for lb p motor,' £18 for 2h p, .£2l for 3h p, £2*4 for 4b p, etc , £1 per year for irons, hot plates, ketti r s, etc., and £ 9 a year for an oven It would coat ■£_ io £6 for lighting, and up to _5 ! for a lighting, heating and cooking (outfit. The installation in the bouse would coßt probably up to 80* for every light point, and more fo** each ' power point If the milking plants were only used 6. or 7 months in the yeer, the charge for horse power would be cut down to half. Mr Birks also spoke of tbe convenience of having outside lights in atables, etc. These would ba little used, and could be charged for at half rates or less. He pointed out that in the Tai Tapu district all the oil engines had been been thrown out for electric motors, and the cost of the eleotric motor was about half the cost of the oil engine ' A bouse with two 50c p lights, four ' 250.p lights and two convenience light! would co3t about £5 per year. c Th.y should be willing to pay that " for tbe reduced fire risk ' Mr Birks, at Okain's Bay and 2 Pigeon Bay showed a number of . lantern slides of tbe Lake Coleridge . system, and tbe different appliances run by electricity., MR A GOODWIN. ( Mr A. Goodwin satd be had been asked by the Council to help them in forwarding the Peninsula scheme. This, as one who knew the conveni i ence of electricity for a number of years, he felt bound to do in the j interests ot the district. He asker* I them not to consider what the scheme t. was going to cost them, but whether they were willing to pay for the great t conveniences of light and power. He t was going to propose to the Council that tbey should print a form which each Peninsula resident would be t asked to sign. This would contain a i guarantee from the Council to provide light and power at tbe charges men tioned by Mr Birks, and if the Council ( could not supply it at tho3e prices they would not be under obligation to take lightor power. He was certain the cost of the reticulation would be less t than was previously estimated. After ( having enjoyed the convenience of electricity for a number of years, he felt it his duty to others in the district to'help tbem to obtain the same henefits, and this h» wes sure wa*-- t ai bin their re*_h by gefctlig Coleridge * power to tbe Peninsula He thought c the scheme was quite feasible if the \ Peninsula people wanted tbe power and light. Ha pointed out that it s should bo Fulßcisntly convincing to . •hem that tbe conveniences we r e very j grout if men like Messrs E. Hay, "nice, II W. Piper and himself took » 'be trouble to attend these meetings ' o advocate bringing Coleridge power to tha Peninsula, whereas they had . not the lea . benefit to derive from it i Tbey must n cognise it was a good ' thipg. | TAI TAPU INSTALLATION ! Mr Goodwin also said he had ar ranged with a number of Peninsula ■•ar owners to visit Tai Tapu on Nov 9th or thereabouts. The cars would take two representatives from each Bay. MR H. W. PIPER. Mr Piper said he waa one of Ihe fi.ist men on the Peninsula to install electric light. He installed bis plant in 1901, and it Co3t him £90. and since theu the annual running cost had not been £2. The difference between an electrically- lit house and kerosene and candles was very greatly in favour of electric light. He had pnjoyed tbe convenience for many years, and could advocate it to anyone He hoped Mr Goodwin and the County Council would be successful in getting Coleridge electricity to the Peninsula, MEETINGS AND QUESTIONS. t There were about thirty present at I tbe Little Akaloa meeting, Mr Bruce presiding. ) An apology was received from Mr j Priest. 3 Mr Hay asked what it would cost a B resident living some way from the bay B to carry the line to tbe branch line.

Mr Birks -said iron wire could be used, and it would cost something like £2 per chain. Mr Hay said he thought tbey should prepare a concrete example as to the cost of connecting up an-eight roomed bouse situated a mile away from the sub line to give residents an idea of tbe cost.

Mr T. Shuttleworlh asked if a p'.iwer plant running seven months would bp charged for at full rates. Mr Birks said it would be cut down to about balf tbat cost.

Mr A H Mcintosh movfd a vote of thanks to Mr Birks, and Mr A Wag born to Messrs Goodwin, Hay and tbe chairman.

PIGEON BAY

There were about twenty present at tbe Pigeon Bay meeting, and there were no questions asked.

Votes of thanks were passed LE BON'S BAY.

Owing to Mr Goodwin's message not reaching Le Bon's, tbere was only a small attendance.

Mr Robert Bruce, in moving a vote of thanks to Mr Birk-*-, said be was sure in his own mind tbat there was nothing like electric light, and it was a saving in firing and discomfort The speakers' explanations were most lucid, and be was sure tbat if only balf the residents took current at first tbe rest would soon follow suit.

Tbe motion was seconded by Mr W C Dalglish and carried.

OKAIN'S BAY MERITING

Tbere was an enthusiastic meeting at Okain's Bay, about fifty residents being present,

At tbe conclusion of the meeting, Mr C Innes asked if houses some dig tance from the branch lines would have to pay for tbe connecting wire.

Mr Birks said this was a matter for tbe Council to arrange. In Tai Tapu tbe consumer had to pay for a certain part of the distance.

Mr J R Tbaoker esked what propor tion of the Peninsula revenue tbe Department would take.

Mr Birk*. said tbe wbole cost of the main line to Akaroa would be placed before tbe Council, and tbe Depart ment would only take what was a fair proportion for their capital outlay.

Mr J R Tb acker moved a vote of thanks to Messrs Birks, Goodwin, and tbe chairman, Mr Bruce.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19151102.2.13

Bibliographic details

LAKE COLERIDGE ELECTRICITY., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3501, 2 November 1915

Word Count
2,762

LAKE COLERIDGE ELECTRICITY. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3501, 2 November 1915

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