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AT THE DARDANELLES.

TROOPER M. 0. MOORE'S

EXPERIENCES.

The following letter has been re eeived by Mr 0. 8 F. Moore, oi Okain's Bay, from his son : —

Pont de Koubbeh Hospital, Abbasia, Cairo, June 12, 1915. " It's not a far cry from Lemnos Hospital to here, though I did come through the trenches. Before you get this I hope you'll get a couple of postcards and a letter I sent from Lemnos. The afternoon they sent me away from there I was not feeling at all fit, and when on the boat that evening I was spreading out my coat to lie on I was not very surprised to find a hole in iL I soon had my tunic off and there was a similar hole, and I got an Australian sitting near to look at my singlet, and he said there was a hole in my singlet and my back just below the shoulder

blade, bo I knew at once I bad stopped a blooming bullet after all, and had been carrying the blamed thing round in my chest all the time. When we Sanded next morning I went round to our old quarters and found I had to work my way up the hill to a new position. There I went straight to the doctor, who was in doubt at first, bnt finally sent me back to the field ambulance on the beach. They were not in doubt, but that night sent me on to the Hospital Ship. The next day started for Alexandria. On the way ovej they extracted my bullet —it just took them about three minutes. Wβ arrived in Alexandria last Sunday night, and next evening I was in a Red Cross train speeding for Cairo. A whole fleet of ambulance cars was waiting, and come pretty girls with tea, biscuits and cigarettes. A good many of us were brought to this Hospital—that is all the Maorilanders, for it is reserved for New Zealand, though the nurees are all Australian, and the orderlies British R.A.M.C, cbaps. I got a bed on a pleaeant cool balcony; but next morning, unfortunately, one of the patients developed ecarlet fever, and the nine of us and the orderly were gent on to another balcony for a week's isolation. This upstairs balcony is on the sunny south corner, and is so hot in the afternoon. You can imagine one's feelings at landing back in Cairo after only a month's absence. To make matters worse, although I can walk round alright, the right side of my chest still has pains, and I'm as -leaf as a post in one ear, so I am afraid I'll sweat here booir weeks yet before I'm allowed back to the firing line. Howtnrer, when I settle down this life should be pleasant enough with plenty to read and eat and smoke. I'd give my money belt though to be with Nolan, who ia getting on well at Malta, near the sea. I haven't had any mail since before I left Egypt. I suppose there's some at the Dardanelles waiting for me. One of these days I ought to get a good pile." A letter from a member of the 4th Reinforcementa wh> knows Trooper Moore mentions that he is about again, though the bullet pierced bis kidney

Got a sore throat? Take a few drops of •NAZOL" on a piece of sigar. Soothes and msec. Z/e baye 60 deeee. ,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19150730.2.11

Bibliographic details

AT THE DARDANELLES., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3479, 30 July 1915

Word Count
574

AT THE DARDANELLES. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3479, 30 July 1915

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