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THE CAPE HELLES ADVANCE.

GRAPHIC DESeBIPTION FROM PBNIN

SULA INFANTRYMAN

A STRUaGLE NEVEK TO BE FORGOTTEN. Private Norman Young, who went in the Main expeditionary Force with tbe 16th Waikato Regiment, gives tbe following graphic description of the attack from Cope Helles alter the lending had bsen effected at Gaba Tfp°: Private Young is well known on the Peninsula, and look part in Peninsula football and athletic meetings. His letter is as follows ; —

"Nile Delta Hoppital

Alexandria, June lib,

We were t°n days at Gaba Tape, and on May 6th the New Zealandeis were cent down to Cape Helles at the entrance of the Dardanelles, to reinforce the French and Tommies We wero taken down at night in destroypm, and landed at four in the morning. We had a spell all day. and were then taken to the trenchee and relieved the Borderers and Royal Soots on the left, with the French on outright. At ten the next morning. Saturday, Bth May, we roa'te an advance under a tremendously heavy tire, and gained 300yde, but lost heavily. We dug in and held on all d»y, and at 5.20 p.m another order came for New Zealanders to be ready for another general advance at 5 £0. All the naval guns started, and every artillery gnn, both Frenoh and our own. Our airships were dropping bomb' over the Turk trenches to ebow the warships the range by having smoke all along ihe Turk trenohes. The hills were nothing but smoke and flame, and you oou'd not hear a thing for the noise of the big guna and artillery. The eune oe&sed, and the or. der oame "Advance, New Zealand ' ./Ml you con'd see was a muss of heads and bayonets rise together. We juet got out in the open when we had a hail of bullets from rifles »nd machine guns and shrapnel. It was a belli Wβ were dropping everywhere. Wβ would make a rush for a hundred j&rdß and atl throw ourselves down for a blow, and then on again. Here I got one on the side of the neck which was bleeding freely. Dozens were lying groaning all around. We a'l made another rush. The French on our right could not k»ep up with us, and we got a lot of enfiladed fire as well. This time I was brought down with two in success on in my ribht h'p. I laid and groaned. There was no cover from the bullets that seemed to be skimming the ground, and I got another in my left hip. It was the end o! me, I thought, and was longing for another to finish me. I looked round in the twilight, ahd saw hundreds rolling and groaning, some killed right out.

It was a sud night. One chap oonld not wilk He was singing "It's a Long Way (o Ticperary," but bis voice died away. Hβ wis bleeding verj bard with a wound in his Rtomnoh I wi'l never forget this nifjht. All my inside seerm d to be running out, and I was blood from bead to foot. There seemed Jj ba no hope of getting away. I managed to undo my equipment and got my water , bottle oat nnd scraped along on my Rtomaeh and gave one or two poor beggars that were yelling for water a drink, but the bottle soon wbb empty. I scraped along among the d-tidies and poppies back to a place where some ol the Boyal Scots were digging in for the night. I was just about done and very weak from loss of blood. Two of the Royal Soots carried me to the dressing station. There they gave me an injection and cut my clothes off, bandaged my wounds, and took me down to the bench to eatoh the boats taking the wounded to thn Hospital Ships. It was a night I wont forget in a burr", and all who took part in it are the same. Instead of shrubs for shelter we only had daisy fields vnd scarlet poppies. It wae much moro open tban at Gabe Tape, It put me more in mind of Banks Peninsula with the fruit trees and green fields of corn, instead ot cocksfoot. We watched the Turks have about 30 shots at our aeroplane one night with a bi» gun of theire, but it had no effect. The New Zealand main body is nearly all out of aotion The mounteds have gone as infantry now. A lot of us will be ready for the firing line in a few weeks again, and are looking forward to seeing Constantinople before returning to New Zealand There are 30.000 Germane mixed up with the Turks, and they are responsible for the determined way the Turks are resisting. There are very few Peninsula boys in the infantry, but qaite a nQinbsr in the mounteds. The ntttick we had on the Buez Canal wai only play compared with α-allipoli Peninsula. Well, as I have sonbllei "nough, I will draw to a close } Hoping to nee the old Peninsula on my re I urn, and have another go at your running events and football matches once mere."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19150723.2.16

Bibliographic details

THE CAPE HELLES ADVANCE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3477, 23 July 1915

Word Count
864

THE CAPE HELLES ADVANCE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3477, 23 July 1915

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