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UNKNOWN

DESCRIPTION BY AN AMERICAN. Mr John Reed, the American journalist, who did brilliant work during tha last Mexican crisis, gives the London •' Daily Mail" d tails as follow of the control of the German bat srie.s by telephone. The men he was ob-ervi g wen , Bavarians : — "So you have oomp to see the siid the captain of the battery politely, trying to oliok hie heels in the mud. "Well, its very quiet here you know. They almost never find ns T.aefc wo lost a gun and »«ek m r>, ••!.(. ibr' «s' jus l a t"fii Hen', -a :hf V" 4 ' , "' !l '<? Vr-naii. Still, you oun't itil a wild ehe'l is liable to blunder down here any time "

Be bl«w bis noee in his handkerchief and nodded carelessly to tho pnnnorg •• All right," he said. They jutnptd baok and clapped their fingers to their ears. Crash ! A flat roar, flame and gtey haze belohed— »nd the whistling screim of the snnrinp tbi'il ruse R/jd dwiiioUd Alnwt rnn>Pffi« fely an eager voicu cried from thn bunk oi the ' ana) behind.

••Kolo8Bal!{Gr at!) In the t'enob! Two and three guns a point down, Bis left, ele vation five-ifixthe."

The gunners turned little cranks and twlflled eorewa. ...

In the side of the steep canal bank behind the gunn there was n doorway hollowed ou' whiob led into a subterranean chamber, On A battered but fine old Flemish cak bedstead oovered with straw lay a young bis k"ees oroeeed An electric light dangled from a poet driven into a dirt wall. He bad a telephone receiver strapped to his ears, a novel l»y open against hu lec;s, md he waimunohing a verl sandwich and reading,

•"fclun'l bear yen ! " ho chontpd into iho xuouthpiecd on his brea?f, and thnn •'Ob, the dame to you> I tried to ten you on Ohriatniae night. He'B gone, eh? Poor fellow 1" He listened. "Yea eir." And then bellowed: "Gun No. 3; half right, three eix-teenthsl" A voice outside re. peated: "Gun No. 3 ; half right, three six teontha! Tbo little chamber sho»k 'hf two Runs fired and flikes of earth entne (ambiiDg down.

"The fellow at the other end of tho wire is in the trenob.es beyond that hill," soid the battery Captain. •■Hβ telephone? back here the range, elevation, the trnjnotory and the efleet of tbe fire. We have been here for two months now and have never eeon tbe enemy." cv:,, TAUBEB ALOFT.

" Oeaee firing 1" cried tho young fallow on the bed ; and something in rapid German. Tho captain explained:

• You Bee," he said, "wo have just got news that n French battery of big puna is wheeling inlo poaitir n juat outo«de our rangn to get after ns. If. beep o.i fivinj.; thry will find us and we will be out sooner or la»er. This battery is jusc oanclr-id tb«tV all. Com* en onteide and I'll f>: .w > ->\ -\ j P inch aoroplano coming up to loollor iia."

The young man with'he novel clo-jed i> nrrf vfiwm-d, nne'aapp d th»- tflt-phone frum £. .» :;:i.-- i;her<.°. n.nd "r«oedod ijb into ejun at Abov- itit. cm-.'-ai. roof n bi <:!■•, *h r> wii 4 "" wa.i z'o ziiggiag iHowly up ugainh; ihsi cloud*. "O'i! that's too bad. Hβ wnn't or pie," eaid thu captain. 'fiO'-k!" :Hh O ; ' "'-■ ' ;■.':■(!■ k f :iu (■(-.•■■■. r")i' '" ■■■ BJi'iJ' cuif a m: i- 'wo .->ilv. rj to 1 o(il«n- r»ii jumping out aeiosH thn unevpn ground I fee U 'g'liniy oranpß runninu , to (nt"o <h<> vi A-- v . ro = r . ' .-.■ 1- .> •.••M ' :..•■ 1 -" •

If .-IK- h.» lor; • C.NT !)«■> vrrrrcmT R^iT.ft , ' W <*■''■■• ••■• ••Mko ... I t , - 1..,,, • •!■■ , ". t; •■ i mouu curved fi epioow aud Ijiuukc ceiling black with Btnoke Iα one'coruer i jagged ebell'tiole was stuffed with ragp, am Bn;opfinlnt' in th nor'b w*<l iln -> •' r»- hi I/Vvu n«.i-> jV.L.uJiiJ.

'"That's what I mean," said the Colonel, pointing to it. "About a week ago I was i-Jk'tati'.g '.o an onWly when a shell explode" ii f) she roovi, You ca.-.'t '■> li where they'rhablfl o c'oaie."

'IT-" fieiiij consisted of aoup from thi ii -d lei'.■ hf i) <:, cann dox ta Is, ohee-io. hrea<! !,I '' w.;. n d exhalations bottles ol ■ inneh ;.-,t, '■W» H iviviiiiiii do without our befr [I li, e . f ,i, e .| UiJ ,i ,] H y i ibink German, .vo'ini b' foi-r-n." an officer

B>;re v,n- a duplicate telephone switch board, arid as wo dined end chatted the news c ime from miles and miles of trenches vow the battle was going and was passed on to othor headquarters. Always the telephonist repeated aloud the messages; the colonel didn't seem to pay nuuoh attention, but ho heard everything, and sometim s brok* off in the middle oJ his «etule talk with a crisp order. Hβ was tellitw. us the story of the Bavarian soldier who fell asleep in the trench and wok 6up to find that his company had abandoned it and thai a body of French were approaching. "Shell dropped in B Company trench," pang rut the >elep)ion<2 operator; "thrap me-- hurt."

"Telephone for the ambuiance, Cocaines,' snapped ilie colonel. ' Schurz. tell Hchmidi to take 4x mcii B Company trench." Schurz salrted and went out

'•As I was Faying," went on the cobnel, •'ho wo':e up in ths trench all alone and fuw a onirpiiny of Frenc 1 men coming over the ft"' id Ar>d an ho pays in the Bavarian -d<a-ir-et. 'Wpl , I kind of thonghfi to tny.-elf I'd tuu-r tnak- iin nttack in force,' and he did, arid naptriirt forty Frenchman,"

"They tell ono anoiher, ,, said me of the oflJeerF, ''about (lie Englifh soldier in the field ho.-tpitnl. The nursa gave him a bath, and afier ho was buck in bed Ehe said, '-I beg your wounj. Where are yo.i wounded ?' 'Oh, I'm not wounded,' f c enid, it is the • aptain who is wounded ; I'm his orderly.' "You p;ople drink like real Bavarians," Itijgh-d nnosher ''Sohwavz, go got half a dozsn bottles."

Just tlifri tho door opsnrd) and in came a yoiinfj oliioer covered with mud, ' I have come tn escort these ge'tlomen in!o the trenoh I"

' NO SPIES INSIDE OUa LINES " We fiunib'erl :he road in th» pitch b\vk !';:bt, Dmn nnd I and the i ffioer, chixt;nrii)|,;i ■fi;ij;i!j(!iUi'.ry French and Bli;l morn frugrntD'aiy German. Th'o ruin fell eteadily On our right the slumps of trees, broken by eheli iire, prioktd eharply up ogninsr. tils hellish illuminntion of tne roc kfts Thewh"vle of bullets over our heads biended into an almost steady sound, and ißHhed the t'ppn like whipp. Half h mile uheaii on the left the big bowiizsrs smote the air one after another with a deep sound. Footsteps crunched the muddy road.

"Bechts J" (to the right!) cried deep voces

■We filed pingly to (.tie right, flashing our pocket lamp? on tin ground. Four muddy giants staggered up with a stretcher on which lomething moaned. Another followed and another.

"What is the word V" I asked. ' "There is no pasa word," said the lieutenant. "But spie3?'' "There are do spies inside tho German lines "

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19150625.2.22

Bibliographic details

UNKNOWN, Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3468, 25 June 1915

Word Count
1,175

UNKNOWN Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3468, 25 June 1915

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