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WAR IN EUROPE.

GERMAN SUBMARINES AT WORK,

FRENCH STEAMER BUNK

London, March 14. The German submarine U29 sank the French pteamer Augusta Conseil off Start Point, Devonshire. The crow were saved, The U29'a attack on the Indian City was witnessed from the shore. The submarine obased the Headland, which she soon overtook and torpedoed after the crew had quitted. Afterwards she pursued the Andelusinn until out of sight of land. The Swedish steamer Hanan was sunk off Scarborough Six out of her crew of twenty were killed, apparently by an explosion. One of her officers states that be saw a torpedo, though the submarine was invisible. The vessel's name and nationality were painted in big letters, extending from the rail to the waterline, in order that she might not be mistaken for anything but a neutral. (The Indian City, the Headland and the Andelusian were attacked off tbG Scilly lales on Friday, and the first named was sunk.) A NARROW ESCAPE. Paris, March 14, The French steamer Compinas just epcaped being torpedoed off Cherbourg by taking refuge behind a neutral ship Torpedo destroyers chafed the submarine, but it escaped, THE DARDANELLES. Paris, March 14. The "Matins" Athtna correspondent •urtes that the Queen Elizabeth, in the Gulf of Saros, destroyed military buildings and several shore batteries. There was violent duel throughout Saturday Dight between cruisers and thfc forts during which French cruisers vigorously cannonaded and dispersed a b'-ciy of Turks. EIGHT-FIVE VESSELS SHUT IN. London, March 14. The reopening of the Dardanelles would release 85 eteamere, including British and 27 Russian vessels. Bucharest, March 14. The city is crowded to overflowing with fugitives from Canstantinople. ZEPPELIN DEBTROYED. ; London, March J4. The "Daily Exchange" reports that two French and two British aeroplanes brought down a Zeppelin. Twenty one of the crew are dead and twenty were seriously injured. The Germans are furious at the destruction of the Zeppelin, They have arrested ajl Belgians caught photographing the debris, HEAVY GERMAN LOSSES. London, March 14. The Press Bureau and the War Office state that the pnemy's beavy counter attack on Saturday affcerpoop was repulsed. Observations on the battlefield and statements of 15,000 prisoners taken show tJbat the Germ&n losses oanno (

■■i*ve been far short of 10,000 in tfare days. . FRENCH SUCCESS. Pari9, March 14. Official—After desperate fighting, the French captured the plateau and half the village of Vaqnouis. GERMAN HYDROPLANE DESTBOYED. Copenhagen, March 11. Fishing boats rescued the crew of a German hydroplane, which was wrecked off Jutland. Rome, March 14. Cugtomg officers of Venice seized two truokloads of beer from Berlin consigned to Tripoli. Ninety two of the barrels contained French rifles and ammunition intended for the Arabs. The shipment was apparently intended to cause Italians trouble io Tripoli. COAL DEBTROTED. London, March 14, The "Chronicle's" Geneva corres pondent states that French aviators bombed the coal depot a fortnight ago at Strassburg, and 24,000 tons of coal were destroyed, or are still burn ing. If the wind rises, the river side quarters will be endangered. ALLIES' ADVANCE, PARIS, March 14 The oflicial communique tonight statps— "The Belgians further progressed in tbe bend nf the Yser, their artillery destroying a German point d'appui in the Dismude grave' yard." -••We repulsed a counter attack and cap- , tured several trenches in the Champagne district, where we found 100 German bodies and a quantity of material in one trench. Our patrols occupied Emhermenil in Lorraine." GERMAN OFFICER ESCAPES Sydney, March 15 I Lieutenant Eartzer. a German military officer who was brought from Babaul, some* bow managed to get aboard the steamer Sonoma and stowid away in a lifeboat, the cover of which was securely faced. Though a oareful search wae made before baling, he was not discovered until while running down the harbour. Groan 3 were heard, and the boat was examined. Lieutenant Kartzer was found in a fainting condition, and sue , oumbed to heart apoplexy. Apparently, he bad the insistence of an accomplice in stowing away.

GERMAN ATTACKS REPULSED

The High Commissioner reports London, 14th March, 10 30 p.m.—"Heavy counter attack delivered by enemy yeeterday after noon, also several minor counter attaok earlier in the day. All were repulsed, Fiom observation in various parts of the field, and statements of prisoners now amounting to 1720, fue enemy's losses were very heavy.'amounting to 10,000 in three days. TRAIN BLOWN UP A train at Don station was blown up by oar aircraft this morning."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19150316.2.5

Bibliographic details

WAR IN EUROPE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3406, 16 March 1915

Word Count
736

WAR IN EUROPE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3406, 16 March 1915

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