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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1915. THE WAR AND AMERICAN TRADE.

The successful settlement of the dispute between Britain and America concerning the right to 3earch American ships for contraband ha 3 been amicably settled, and the American Ambassador has assured the United States that Britain's attitude is of tho most friendly nature. An interesting article in the Boston "Monitor,' early in November, gives some idea of tbe new export business done by America during tbe first fetv weeks of the war. A New York correspondent writes concerning shipments 0 f mineral oil and copper, showing t _ a t the intervention of Britain wa? es peoted. Tbe article is as follow 3 •

"What promises to be a serf- OU3 Befi back to two departments / 0 f export business developed when Er,gland announced that mineral oils an( j CO pp 6r bad been made absolu-a contraband Also tbe doctrine oS V.tirnate destination' will be applied., w bich will endanger shipments tansr ufcra i porti . * { ifc is suspected th_ir fcj ie eargo gg win finally go to bsllfeew , n fc territory.

"Announcement that cotton would not be interfered with, even if con signed, to-a comba' cant, and the seizure of shipments of copper consigned to Italy, "are recertf, features in the situa tion. Theyawjrefleoted in export of 178,024 bale* 0 f cotton from October 28 to Ooto_*r 30, inclusive, comparpd with 107,86. in tho prpcodinp* n°rind Copper shipments were 11,793, 600 pound's- frarn Ootober 24 to October 29, COtupwja with 19.465,760 m the Corresponding Prions pen'orl. Ger many will need 50,000 baies of cntion a month and Austria 25.000 Germany is reported to have bought cot ton heavily in the South lately.

"Cotton goods have also been in demand. Wellington, Sears &Co, of Boston, have an order for 500,000 ysrds of cotton duck from French government, and are said io be inak ing 1,000,000 yards for the British. The British Government has placsd an order for 500,000 yards of muslin and other material with a New York supply house.

" Exports of wheat and flour from United States and Canada last week were 7,004,000 compared with 4,108,000 bushels for the correspond ing week of 1913. Since July 1 there have been exported 12?i,529,000 bushels, compared with 9 7,709.000 last year.

'• An Omaha concern is '■ /eported to>:i| have received order for 15,000,000 j founds o£ canned m p.ats, worth 51.500,000, and orders for dry Fait pork amount to more t .ban supply in eight. Chicago packers have enough!

orders lo keep running full time for a year r it is mid. War orders for cloth ing, trucks, .harness", tinned meat? ( etc., in Chicago aud neighbouring markets amount to between $7,000,000 and 58.000.000 dollars From Cadi fomia comes report 0f76D,0D 8 cases of caiiusd fruit exported this year, compared with 523,09$ in 1913, and 596,987 cases of canned aalmon, compared with 296,863, Exports of canned beef jumped Itrom 264,000 pounds in September, 1913, to 2,885,000 in September this year, bhjpinents ot : fresh oieats increased from 634,000 pounds in September of last year to- 7,037;000 last month. Exports of barley -increased 1000 per Cane, of oa.ts 3000 per cent., and cf rice 700 par cant"A banker believes that entirely new export, bu'.sine-. of §200.000,000 has been done, tiy 'hi* emucry .viutiin tbu last three- weeks. One Now York con cem reported export business since October 1 of between §60,000,000 and §70,000,000. France, Hid estimated, has span* §30,000,000 here on food stuffs and war nituerial t-iace the war a arfced An encouragmg feature of the situation, according to Max May, of Guarantee Tr«s» Company, is tbe growth of "dollar pxebaoge" drawn by South America This exchange, ' he cays, is in thu millions. Estimates of business done in this couutry by European nations are made difficult by the growing unwillingness o* manufacturers to disclose their orders, for fear their shipments will be held up on tb c high seas." This article gives some idea of the .expansion of trade caused by the war, and which we in this country have al ready felt in wool, dairy produce and frozen meat export, <

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Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1915. THE WAR AND AMERICAN TRADE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3467, 5 January 1915

Word Count
684

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1915. THE WAR AND AMERICAN TRADE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIV, Issue 3467, 5 January 1915

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