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SCENES IN ANTWERP

London, October 11. Tne field army retired from Ant-! werp in good order. The iefcrear; which began several days ago, v.as completed under the best conditions. The soldies were ordered to leave the forts before they were blown up. Tbey also destroyed stores of petrol and benzine, and broke up the workshops at the Minerva factory, where machine guns, armoured trains and aeroplanes were made during last month.

German Zeppelins and aeroplanes dropped HO bombs during the siege.

Three hundred thousand Germans participated in the attack.

Tbo conduct of King Albert throughout was an inspiration to the Belgian troops, He wore the uniform of a private soldier, and shared their meals with the men in the trenches.

Amsterdam, October 10. * When the explosion of the first "hell boomed in Antwerp the city was dark, The empty streets suddenly became alive with people, women and children crying, and flocking in every direction. There was a lull for a quarter of an hour, and then came the booming of the big guns. Each shot was followed by a weird and long drawn out din, and then the final explosion was most fearsome. It all continued till dawn, when there was a respite of two hours, after which it recommenced more fiercely than 6ver while the fortress guns and field batteries joined in the chorus, flames breaking out everywhere and buildings crashing down, The city became an inferno. Meanwhile fugiives, half naked, thronged the streets, the young dragging the old and infirm after them. There was no time to take their property. Numbers of women fainted in their frantic efforts to reach the trains.

Fugitives olung to every available part of the trains, Eat on the footboards and roofs, even in the tenders. Others swarmed on the boats at the quay. Thousands who were lefE be bind proceeded on a weary march to the frontier, which was reached in an exhausted condition. A pathetic sight was the number of escaped lunatics who are roving the country. The "Handelsblad" says "the possession of Antwerp may be satisfaction to Germany, but the German object has failed. The destruction of the garrison was more important than the capture of the fortress." Ostend, October 11. The Belgians manned the trenches at Antwerp for seventy hours. Head quarters were established in a high tower, which was connected by tele phone with all the trenches. While the battle was confined to the infantry they held their own, but the over' powering massed artillery fire directed from the Taube aroplanes was irresistible. The English Women's National Service Hospital had alarming ex peridnces Ie was necessary to rescue 130 patients, who were in the direct line of shell fire and close by the ammunition building. Those able to walk were allowed to find their way out of the city. Sixty of the mosc seriouß cases were carried to cellars, where they spent Thursday night, shells bursting above throughout the night. Amsterdam, October 11. The Antwerp garrison blew up Fort? De Ichopten, Brassoast, Muexem, Cappellen and others, Three Belgian troops crossed the Dutch frontier, and have been interned by Holland. THE NEUTRALITY QUESTION. London, October 11. The capture of Antwerp imposes additionalduties on the British fleet to see that the duties of neutrality are not violated by the Germans crossing the Scheldt.

ENTHUSIASM IN GERMANY. Rome, October 11.

The fall of Antwerp haß caused unprecedented enthusiasm in Germany, where it is regarded as the beginning of the end. Flags were hoisted, and demonstrations are parading the streets Wounded soldiers who recently arrived at Aix la Chapelle, Cologne and Dusseldorf were covered with flowers and given presents.

The "Tage Zeitung" states : "The capture of Antwerp carries with it the germ of the capture of Paris. It is a most serious blow to England."

Ostknd, October 11,

The Belgian army and the British force with the King of the Belgians have arrived here safely.

London, October 11

The Central Exchange correspon dent at the Hague reports that the Germans are swiftly moving on Ostend

THE GARRISON DESTROYED.

hoping to capture King Albert and the Government. THE KAISER'S SON. The Hague, October 11. The Kaiser has bestowed the Iron rross on his sod August Wilhelm, who was among the first to penetrate the Antwerp fortifications. THE FIGHT IN FRANCE. Paris, October 11. An official communique states that the German cavalry who seized pas-! sages on the Lys, east of Aire, were expelled on Saturday. They retired i into the Armenstiera district. The Germans artacked very vigorously between theAisne and the Oisne but did not make progress The Allies have progressed some what north of the Aisne, especially northwest of Soissons.

The German right attack between Craonne and Rbeims was repulsed.

The Germans attacked violently in the Apremont region and captured Apremont. The French retook the town and still bold it.

There is nothing fresh at Rheime, the Meuse, also in Lorraine, and the Vosgee. Paris, October 11 The cavalry during tbo battle of the Aif'io became bored by their inaction, and petitioned General AlleDby to be allowed to serve in the ; trenches. As their carbines were useless, General Allenby armed a third of the cavalry with rifles and bayonets similar to the . mounted infantry in South Africa and | employed them as they wished. THE RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN. The Hague, Oct. 11 Official reports from Vienna declare that the Austrians repulsed tbe Russians at Przemyol and defeated fivs divisions near iliaricufc, 30 miles west of Jaraslow, which is about 18 miles north of Przemyol. The Austrians also repulsed a small force at Dynow, 25 miles south of Jaraslow,

The German losses in the battle oi Augustvo are estimated at 60,000. Venice, October 11.

The Anglo French fleet sank two Austrian torpedo boats in the Adriatic. A mine sank an Austrian destroyer. AMERICA'S REQUEST. Ostend, October 11. The United States bas requested Germany tc revictual. Brussels, and has suggested that the United States Minister control the distribution of food,

Besides the food shortage in Bru.v sela the Belgian Ministerannounced that there is famine at Liege, Namur, Luxemberg and Hambault. NEW GUINEA. Sydney, October 12. Latest reports from New Britain state there bas been some little fighting since the capture of Rabaul. The natives have given some trouble, but there were no further casualties.

GERMANY WELL PROVISIONED Sydney, October 11.

Mr Hatrick, the well known Sydney agricultural chemist, who has returned from a visit to Germany, states that he left Berlin by the last train before the declaration of war. He says that Germany's internal resources are such as to en* able her to carry on the war for a couple of years at least. The farm work is being carried on by boys and women. The rye crop which has been garnered was exceptionally good, and wheat and oats promise well. Bottling up the fleet made no difference so far as the international food supplies were concerned It was absurd to talk of starving Germany in that way.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19141013.2.7.1

Bibliographic details

SCENES IN ANTWERP, Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 3445, 13 October 1914

Word Count
1,163

SCENES IN ANTWERP Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 3445, 13 October 1914

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