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The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1914. BISMARCK AND THE KAISER.

Iγ the Kaiser enjoys limelight he eer tainly is getting enough of it just now What the Germans really think of him remains to be. seeti; but the views held by his enemies are not at all flattering. The latest nofoa we have jg that the German Humanity League has issued a manifesto from Rotter dam demanding the deposition of the Kaiser,'as in the interests of the Ger man wage earner the domination of Prussia must ba swept away alto gether after the war. This manifesto is what was only to be expected Ger

many has not yet realised the extent of suftering she has to go through— her lose of trade and the years of hard

work which will have to be spent in building up her commercial strength once more. When a, full realisation

cornea of what this war means to the country at large, the Kaiser and bis w&r party are not to be envied. The

vials of wrath-from an injured nation will be poured upon them, and .tbe result must be. a time of trial at least to tbe reigning bouse of Prussia Tbe Kaiser's aim has certainly been to be come arbitrator of Europe, and he bas failed significantly. It is said that he has adopted the policy of Bismark, the man whom he dismissed, but he has proved absolutely lackingin Bisrnarck\s .genius for grasping a clear idea of Germany's position. The Kaiser also bas suffered from' what 13 vulgarly termed a swelled bead in his ideas of German superiority in arras. The following comparison between tbe Kaiser and Bismarck taken from a contemporary is of interest:—

"It was the boast of Bismarck in bis later years tbat he bad brought about three wars, the Danish, the Austrian and the French. But 'every time, he eaifl, ' I first made myself 6uro whether the war, if successful, would bring fruits of victory worth the sacri fices. which every war requires,' He made pure also, before be started, that the war would be eucceseful, i»nd with this object be took care that Pruj'fift w»s never embroiled with too many enemies at onetime. First Denmark, then Austria, then Fraooa —never half a dozen nations all together. And after he had crushed France be set; himself to confirm and

strengthen (he position Gormnny had' wan by forming strict alliances with friendly Powers, and;using all his arts to promote mutual suspicion and b'ostility amongst Powers which might not be so friendly. Such a policy of confirming Germany ns a E.uropean Power Y.-rts far too'moderate* for-the Kiiser. His ambitions lequired that she should be a world Power, despotic on tbe sea as on tbe land. But, all tbe time that be has been building armaments for aggression on a scale which threatened to exhaust the financial resources of Germany, and of other Powers which struggled to keep pace with her, be lacked his predecessor's skill to prevent the j combination of those countries (which hig preparations threatened. \ France allied herself with Russia, Britain and France found that they could agree quite well in an Entente , later, the Fntenfce was extended to in elude Russia. Even the Germans bad to admit that there was nothing] aggre.ssive in this grouping of. -three' Powers against the Triple Alliance formed by Bismarck, so long as Grer many herself did not intend aggression. .' The Kaiser made some bold attempts, however, to break up the Entente. He failed on each occasion, and be fniied also to maintain the conviction which Bismarck bad forced on Italy that France and Rngsia were her natural enemies, and Germany and Austria her true friends. Finally be

forced Germany, and an Austria not. fit to go to war with Servia, into war with all the strongest Powers of Europe."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140929.2.3

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1914. BISMARCK AND THE KAISER., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 3441, 29 September 1914

Word Count
638

The Akaroa Mail TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1914. BISMARCK AND THE KAISER. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 3441, 29 September 1914

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