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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1914. THE INVASION OF BRITAIN.

Much is being said of ,tbe prr-po-ed German invasion of* England, aud various surmises as to the chances of Gerraauy's success, It appears io us that nothing could suit. B itaio hotter than for the Germans to attempt to Bend transports of. troops across tbe channel. '• There is ho doubt'that on aea our men far surpass the Germans, and it does not seam likely tbat the Germans will risk an open engagement with our cruisers. Tbe news re ceived about the sinking of the fifteen fishermen's boats shows the class of warfare their cruisers want. With our superior naval strength and tbe proved superiority of our submarines, Britain has little to fear from a naval engagement. It must be admitted tbat tbe German advance on France hao lucen very rapid in the last two weeks, but, after ail, she has not yet done what she set out to do. She has had to abandon her project of pressing on to Paris, and is evidently now trying to separate communication between the main French army and tbe forces in Alsace Lorraine. Tjbere are many instances of the ''biter bit' in history, and there seems no reason why the Germans should not afford another example. They appear to hold a very bombastic view of of their successes, and those who are inclined to despond must remember tbe conflict .9 only begun. In the famous Penin aula War, when Wellington was stub bornly fighting Napoleon, be made very slow advances, and many people argued that he must be driven back to tbe coast. There were many desperate situations, but British pluck and deter mination . turned the tide, and we believe tbat there are still many men of the iron will of Wellington guiding our 4rmies. The great Secretary for War, Lord Kitchener, is not the man to talk much, but there is no doubt that he can comprehend and combat the machine like precision of tbe Ger man army. From the start of the war the Germans have shown great readiness to exaggerate their successes and rejoice over the fall of various towns. It may be well to remind the timorous, who are inclined to despond over tbe situation, that there is a little French proverb which reads; "He laughs best who laughs last."

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Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1914. THE INVASION OF BRITAIN., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4427, 8 September 1914

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392

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1914. THE INVASION OF BRITAIN. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4427, 8 September 1914

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