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A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT INDEPENDENT INQUIRER.

Mr J. C. Tompson, M.P., speaking in Ihe House in 1905, on the ocoasion of the in trodaction of Mr Sidey's Bill for a Referendum on the Bible in schools queston,said (Hansard, 1905, page, 7311 . "I visited the largest school in Sydney, nnd the head teacher told me that be had not heard of any discontent "with the system, au I that he himself would be very sorry to ccc religious reading lessons taken out of the -.chools, aa they were productive of xmjoh good." SECULARISM IN EDUCATION ANTI.NATIQNAL. Nothing shows the anti-national character of the National Schools' Defence Lea ue more than its merciless and relentess hostiiiy to the Bible in the, syllabus of our national schools. In April last, with Mr John Caughley in the chair, this league enthusiaftieally adopted a report in which it said that it wad "irreeonoilably opposed" to reading in the curriculum of the State So , oola. Tins incredible narrowness gives this league the stamp cf anti.national. This narrowness 6'erates this "Defence , * League by a great gulf from the and educationists of Britian. Mr Runciman, speaking as a member of the Asquith Cabinet the os her year, said thpt the Government that attempted to banish the Bible from the scho'ils deserved to be thrashed at the polls. A recent visitor—the Rev. Dr. Jom'.i—said that 99 per. cent., of the people of England would be opposed to puttiag the f-iblo out of the schools, In the remarkable phamphlet "Toward Educational Peace" it is stated that the seoularising'of public schools would be educationally hurtful and also repugnant to the wishes of the immense majority of the parents." Among those responsible for this deliverence were the prominent Congregationalistß, suce as the late Rev. frilvestes Home, M. P., and Principal Selbi;e prominent Baptists, such as the Rev. J. H. bnakespheare and Dr. W. T. Wiiitley leading Methodists each as Professor Mouion and Dr, Workman, and a large number o; Anglicans. All these men would reject wijh scorn and indignation the sugaestion that the Bible should bs flung out of the schools of Britain and the schools remain 'nationait The=e men would rather die than see the public schools degraded to a sectarttm that, would furnish an occasion to an English Jlr, Cleary to say that religion was treated in , the national sohools as though it was a "declared leper or a bubonic rat." HEAL REASONS OP OPPONENTSThsre are a number of active and intelligent enemies to Christianity, who feel impelled to hinder its efforts, even when it can be shown that the churches are at present unfairly hampered by present conditions. These people view with dislike any movement to free the advance of religion. In this movement they are clearly acting an oppressive part. Far larger, however, is the number of ill-informed and indifferentr The latter present the vis inertiae to the wheel of progress, and rasent any alteration in the present scheme of things, which does not appeal to their present views of expediency. Such .people are beiDg roused by the more active class, but their opposition is of a kind which 'will vanish with further knowledge. Seme have genuine but strained and artificial views as to the relations of the nation and religion. Others again, by unworthy suspicions of religious bodies othor than their own. They cherish vague and unreasonable fears that the churches which lead the movement are seeking to strike at the rest, The earnest and impartial student of affairs must however approach it with an open mind and balance facts fairly. When this is dons, the overwhelming [[case; for Bible in schools will aseuredly be appreciated.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140731.2.19.3

Bibliographic details

A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT INDEPENDENT INQUIRER., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4416, 31 July 1914

Word Count
609

A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT INDEPENDENT INQUIRER. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXIII, Issue 4416, 31 July 1914

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