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OPENING OF PARLIAMENT.

FOUR MONTHS SESSION EXPECTED. THE LEGISLATIVE PRO GRAMME. It was agreed on all hnnd-i fli«t tbe legislative programme laid down by the Government will provide four months of solid work. The actual work of the session wiil begin to day, when an imprest Bill will probably be introduced. Next week will witness the openirjg of tbe Addrrss-in Reply debate Tbe mover of tbe Addiess. will be Mr E. P. Lpp, member for Oatrnvii', and the s-conder Mr G. R. Svke°", member for Masterton.

The Lpeielativo Council Reform Bill, which ijf to follow closely upou 'be line*' of tbe measim-a introduced last year and the year before, will be laid before the Upper House early in tbe pPFsiurj. list on 'hi* op. casion, however, me materially improved on accoVnt of tbe fact th*t the Government has announced its intention of making sufficient new appointments to the Upper House to secure tbe passage of tbe liefol no Bill.

An expected early arrival in the Lower House is the Licensing Bill, which proposes to reduce tbe effective majority at tbe National Prohibition poll from 60 to 55 per cent. One of the most important Bills to bo introducid during the session is that dealing with local grants and subsidies, It is not intended to interfere with the existing forms of county and munici pal government, but will readjust the system of State grants and subsidies in the direction of concentrating assistance upon those local bodies which have development work to carry out. The Bill is regarded as second in im portance only to tbe Legislative Council Reform Bill, and the Government, it is stated, is determined to secure its passage as being an essential item in the Reform programme.

The Imprest Supply Bill will in all probabiii'a have to be introduced on Friday, and as this debate affords bCope for a very free discussion all round tbe political compass there may be at times a little lively sparring. The Government has its legislature proposals well up to date, and quite a number of Bills may be expected to rnaka their appearance very early'in the 89s;-ion. Amongst thosß will be the Education Bill, providing for an increase in salaries, and tbe staffiug of the schools, as well as a more equitable pystem of promotion.

The Defamation Eill which met with such strenuous opposition last session will be re introduced, and a strong effort made to put it through. The Bill briefly proposes to widen tbe freedom of the Press in regard to the legitimate criticism of men and affairs,

It is practically certain the Prime Minister will bring down a measure dealing with the question of the immigration of aliens,' particularly Hindus, and another Bill will seek to put the immigration system as a whole on a more satisfactory footing.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140626.2.12

Bibliographic details

OPENING OF PARLIAMENT., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4407, 26 June 1914

Word Count
469

OPENING OF PARLIAMENT. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4407, 26 June 1914

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