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NEW ZEALAND FISH.

PROFESSOR PRINCE'S VISIT

Professor Princp, who is compiling a report upon the fisheries of tbe do minion, met the fishermen and mer chants at the Bluff,, and vauous matters of supply, tram-pot >md demand. Tbe 'merchants made it clear that there was little or no de mand for second class fib such as moki, '• Jack Stewarts," ana so on, and hundreds of cases wer« continu ally taken from the freezer nnd dump ed, owing to there being no demand. The people of New Zealand wanted the better cla?s fish, and tbe cost of production, duty and freight made it impossible to find foreign waikets Complaint was also mide tb>>t tbh railway authorities cbargfd heavy freight?, .but did nos exercise reason able expedition in getting the fiUh to New Zealand ceMrets,

Tbe correspondent of the "Lyttel ton Times," ueked the Piofe3sor. "Do you consider nationalisation could be a success in New Zealand, making every fisherman a State employee?"

"I can't answer that question," said the Professor. .. ' •

"If nationalisation were given effect to.would you suggest paying fisbermen wagee or perowi?"

"I am- sorry,"' said-itbe Professor, "but I cannot answer cither."

"Do you consider," atked the re porter, "that New Zealand second clasß fisu could possibly compete with the Home artiole either in England or elsewhere wtnn the cost and canning is sc much heavier here?"

Professor Prince replied that what fishermen classed as Eecond-slase here was really first class elsewhere.

"Can jou find a market for it?"

"Yes, I think so. In Canada we have a fish known as the bake which was thrown back by tbe thousands because there was no demand for it. It is now made up in attractive fashion as boneless cod, and thtre is a great demand all over Canada for it. From Nova Scotia it is sent right across to Vancouver, right throughout Canada and also fiads a inatket in England and the West Indies, and actually iv the United States, which is most ex traordinary. It is packed appetismgly, and I have even seen it in New Zealand, thousands of miles from Nova Scotia."

"Then you suggest that export is possible?"

"The experience of other countries shows that there are very few fish for which a market cannot Lie found "

"With reference to oysters, what do you think of our methods aod storage?"

Professor Prince replied tbat be bad just inspected tbe oyster wharves and storage beds and he was "delighted with them. They were far ahead of anything of tbe kind be had ever seen d and tbt merchants bad shown great enterprise indeed. Tbe arrange rnents were really fine and the fish sheds very convenient and compact with plenty of clean water. "I tbink," he said, "that tbe approach is too shallow, as tbe fish should go to tbe sheds direct, and with as iittie band ling as possible. It is a pity tbat there is not deeper water near the sheds. In Aberdeen and elsewhere expedition is everything, and you have only to see the arrangement here to see that no time is wasted. lam very pleased with the sheds other wise."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140529.2.12

Bibliographic details

NEW ZEALAND FISH., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4399, 29 May 1914

Word Count
523

NEW ZEALAND FISH. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4399, 29 May 1914

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