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The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1914. THE DISTURBER OF THE PEACE.

Tub indignation in Japan over the remarks of General Sir lan Hamilton

13 only natural, and in many ways it is unfortunate that Mr Massey and the Hon, Jas. Allen should have been reported as speaking in the same strain. Nevertheless there is rr.ucb Bound sense in what Sir Inn Hamilton sayp, and the white Australasian races have a severe menace in tbe Japanese and Chinese. There is no doubt that these aliens like living under European conditions and dealing with the white men. Also their land is overcrowded, and they are increasing enormously inJ numbers. The ] overflow bas to go somewhere, and no more congenial place can be found than Australia and New Zealand. It would be interesting to know what the increase in the Mongolian population of New Zealand is, say, in the last decade, and in' Australia, especially in Queensland, where tbe increase has been much higher. These people may be good citizens in many ways, but they cannot be rmfcuralieed. and remain firm supporters of theii: Dative countries, The consequence is that these Japs, and Chinese form smalt groups of aliens, and as time goes on and their numbers increase, the groups will become a powerful factor in our midst. Whatever may be said to the contrary, Sir lan Hamilton is right in his statements as to the danger from the invasion by the Mongolian races. The. question is whether it is wise to make such statements openly.. It would have been better to have taken preventive measures quietly to guard against any un pleasant surprise in the future. Prob ably General Hamilton thought tbe position was spvere enough to justify those in authority offending the Japanese nation if only Australians and New Zealanders could be made to see the gravity of the situation. A visitor to a country has a better chance of judging possibilities than those who, living in the same place from year to year, do not observe the graduations of an important change, and seeing tbe possibilities of Mon golian domination, General Hamilton has emphasised bis remarks, hardly realising that bis tour would be made 3D public or that his speeches would reach thr Japanese people. From Japan's point of view tbe offence is a severe one, and it is hardly surprising that the Japanese papers are up in arms; but if" General Hamilton thought the white races were in danger of an invasion be was quite justified in pointing out their danger to them. He may be a "Disturber of the Peace," but it is better for the peace to be disturbed now when we have a chance of guarding against an invasion than later when the Mongolian races have a firm footing in Australia . • -

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Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1914. THE DISTURBER OF THE PEACE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4398, 22 May 1914

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466

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1914. THE DISTURBER OF THE PEACE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4398, 22 May 1914

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