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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1914. IMPROVEMENT IN PENINSULA FARMING.

This is decidedly an age of utility. It is remarkable when one looks back to last century and to periods previous to that time what immense waste of materials was oarried on every day. People lived carelessly, and using

For J> fluenza take Woods' Great Peppermint Cure. Never fails, 1/6, 2/6

rough implements threw away much

ibat was of value. The advance of

science has led to the discovery of the n uees to which byproducts can be Wj made, and where a man plying an in- r dustry in the old days only took no'.e of the main material, now he utilises , the by-products as muub as the chief j article. At one time a mun was cou- J sidered small and mean if he guarded against waste and used up all within his reach. Science has done much in the advancement of agriculture and the value of land, and the rush of competition has rendered it absolutely necessary for modern farmers to use every small byproduct on their farms. Taking a view of the history of farming on the Peninsula alone, the change is very apparent. Fifty years ago milking cows was heavy work, and each man made his own cheese. The work was carried on in a rougb ' i manner, and though many of tbe farmers of that time worked hard, the production of cheese was carried on in a most slovenly manner. Later, when the co operative cheese factories

were started, an immense improve meat was made. Better facilities were obtainable for the output of the cheese, and a better system of selling inaugurated. The new plan to start a butter factory at Akaroa is another step in the progress of the district, and it is gratifying to note that the Bnrry's Bay Co operative Cheese Factory is installing a whey butter plant. The piggeries in connection with the factories have not been tbe success that they should have been, owkg to the control of the market. The weaners are bought at the time when the price is the highest, and the piga are sold when the market is moat depressed. We have remarked many times on the need for a bacon factory on the Peninsula, but until that is instituted the profit from piggeries must be smaller than it ought to be. In every other agricultural district of any .size there is a bacon factory, and the Peninsula farmers are losing money by not following suit. The work of the dairy farmer is going to be extended still further at no late date by the coming fruit-growing industry. Orchard work can be carried on easily in conjunction with milking, and the profits aro so good that in a few years up to date dairy farmers will have their annual profits from fruit growing. The labour problem.is the crumple in the rose leaf, and the farmer who has a family of children to aid him will be in a good position. Machinery is rapidly replacing labour everywhere, and when a farmer is independent of outside labour he is free from the worry which makes any enterprise more or less doubtful, The progreßß in the farming methods of the Peninsula has been most rapid, and every possible use is being made of the valuable land which makes this district such a rich one.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140519.2.4

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1914. IMPROVEMENT IN PENINSULA FARMING., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4397, 19 May 1914

Word Count
567

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 19, 1914. IMPROVEMENT IN PENINSULA FARMING. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4397, 19 May 1914

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