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STOCK AT RAUKURA.

SOME INTEREi-TISG FIGURES. In an aiticle en the State Experiment Farm Bt Euaknra, a epecial correspondent cf the Auckland "Herald" states that last yea>-1 c leturns from butter fat from the herd of Jtreeya kept Bt Euakura was £16 183. per acre; from the herd ot Shorthorns it aver aged £17 2a. per acre, The bull calves from the Jerßeys sold t.t an average of £40 each. The heifera were kfpt, but if their average value was only estimated at £10, it is easy to Fee that without reckoning: on the value of skim-milk the returns per aore were nearer £30 than £20, because it is only taking about an aore of land at Euakura to keep a cow, end very much less to keep a calf for a year. The value of the Shorthorn calves averaged sbont £17 all round, so that calves and butter fat alone yielded £34 23 or thereabouts for very little more than an acre. It is not likely, of course, that ordinary farmers today would get anything near the values just mentioned for their calves, but when our farmers lift their herdß to the same butter fat capacity aa those at Euakura, and this is well within reasonable limits. It is not likely that ordinary farms to day would carry anything near a cow to the acre, but I am absolutely sure, adds the correspondent, that with very little troub'e and ezpeme in the way of top.dressing pastures and growing roota and crops, every fa»m on arable country in the Auckland province could be easily made to do so. Dairy farm* ing is not carried on at Ruakura on lines impossible but on lines which every farmer can follow, providing that he has enough capital to work hia land even up to a very moderate Btate of production.

PnormnLE Shjlkp Fahmiko,

Kuakura is carrying about 2800 sheep, coiv sistlng of two Btud flocka-Englieh Leicester end Southdown, and a Lincolnvßomney ewe flock for fat lamb experiments. The ewe 3 get nothing but grass until just before lambing, when they reoeive a moderate supply of mangolds, which are carted to them on the pastures. &3 last year eig , t acres of mnncolds Bofliccd lot the requirements of POO ewes, it con be seen that the cost of those roots per head was not excessivr. The lambs ere topped off on rape in from two to the c weeks, an acre of this crop easily fatle ing filty lambs. Grass, mengolda, and iape seem to prove excellent feed for ewes and lambs and as the net price on raiHor Bua kura lambs has averaged between 10: to 21s per head it is plain prof that the/ thriv9 well.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140217.2.16

Bibliographic details

STOCK AT RAUKURA., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4372, 17 February 1914

Word Count
454

STOCK AT RAUKURA. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4372, 17 February 1914

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