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The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914. THE COST OF STRIKES

Here in New Z9tlaui ail ba\e felt the pinch of tbe watersidewotkers' strike. The dulocuiion of trade meant daily loss to all the large manufactur-

ing and retail firms and indire'itly lorS to every member of the community.

Numbers of employee* in these firms were thrown out of work temporarily, and it should have been clearly do

monstrated to the strikers that it was the poor man who suffered most by their action, Tbe rich man suffers also, but in proportion smaller people had a much bigger loss. In the ca36

of a strike there is no chance of com forting oneself wilh the reflection that what is one man's loss another man's gain. New Zealand was starting a season tbat promised to be most prosperous, and the strikers practically flung thousands of pounds into the deep sea, The South African strike is just another example of tho absolute waste and futility of strikes. There | the loss by tbe declaration of martial law in Johannesburg was very great. As our readers know once the Riot Act is read and martial law proclaimed, citizens can recover no insurance on damaged property, and that is one of the reasons why our New Zealand Government decided to use every effort to refrain from reading the Riot Act in Wellington. A cablegram from Johannesburg states tbat tbe Rand i 3 losing jover £100,000 weekly through tbe strike and two large firms lost £2700 and £3500 respectively. Tho pity cf it is that no one g-iins these !ar£,e sums of money, They sink into

nothingness, and the world is poorer by that amount through the cessation of human activity during tbat pericd, Tho "Sydney Sun," writing about the South African strike, says that tbe two upheavals in New Zealand ard South Africa shouid Le a lesson to lha Australian Unionists "red" section, as on both occasions tbe strikes have proved a loss to tho woikmen, The •Sun" snys these men should not be persuaded to seek a revolutionary success, bu*; should redress their wrongs by legal enactments for arbitration and conciliation. Tbe workmen should learn that tbe bringing on of a general strike to injure tbe employers is only tbe act of a' Samson in pulling down a temple on himself and his enemies The loss must fall upen the workman as well as the employer, and the former is leas able to bear the

burden

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19140123.2.4

Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914. THE COST OF STRIKES, Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4366, 23 January 1914

Word Count
412

The Akaroa Mail. FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914. THE COST OF STRIKES Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXII, Issue 4366, 23 January 1914

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