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THE STRIKE.

LATEST DEVELOPMENTS.

Wellington, 9 a.m

Tbe Tramway Union decided not to cancel its registration uder the Arbi fcration Aeb by a vote of 81 to 80. The feeling was expressed that other unions more intimately connected with tbe watersiders than the tramwaymen should go out before the tramwaytnen were called out to strike. It was agreed to make a levy of 5 per cent on unmarried men and 2| per opnfc on married men, in support of the strikers.

Tbo Maori's crew are composed entirely of members of the Merchant Service Guild, In the stokehold there were seven " extra ticket " master?, and among the deck hands nine ai the A.B.s were masters. In fact, they were everywhere. There were enough offering to man both the Maori and the Wfthine. It is stated that the Company offered extra money for service in inferior positions, but the men declined to accept it. Several mass meetings were held yesterday, afc which the speeches were more guarded than usual. The general burden was reiteration of the belief that the strikers would win in the end. Among the speakers was a new editor of the "Maoriland Worker," a man named Colclougb, who was arrested on a charge of using a revolver in Post Office Hquare on October 80'b. An Austrian, Antonio Stuparick, was arrested on a charge of rioting on the same day. Wellington, noon. Work 13 still proceeding steadily on the wharves. The holding of meetings of strikers in the Post Office Square dfb been stopped, The Mararoa, on which the Arbi tration Unionists are accommodated, | is now alongside the Queen's wharf, i Edward Colclough, acting editor of the " Maoriland Worker," charged with firing a revolver at a constable, and James Hassett charged with attempting to murder Commissioner Cullen, were both remanded afc the Magistrate's Court this morning. Wellington, 1.20 p m.

The membership of the new Union is 700, and the Mararoa is unable to accommodate any more working men than she has now aboard.

Those working on the Maori are being housed and fed on board. Tbe Athenio has completed coaling, and is ready to sail to morrow. HOPEFUL OUTLOOK AT DUNEDIN.

Dunedin, 10.5 a.m.

The feeling here is nothing like so bitter a3 in the northern centres, and no trouble is anticipated to morrow when work will start on the wharves,

The wharf employers are defcerRimed to give preference to members of the Arbitration Union, which is constantly receiving accessions to its strength,

Owing to the fact that the Dunedin waterside workers carried their decision to join the Federation by a majority of only three vote?, there has always been a strong minority hostile to the Federation methods, and it is anticipated that the position will coon be entirely dominated by the more moderate section of the men. Amongst the latter are quite a number who have denounced the strike and the strike leaders tactiqs all along.

Judging by present indications the term of inaction is nearing the end. SITUATION AT LYTTELTON. Lytxelton, Nov. 17.

The eighteenth day of Lyttelton strike broke miserably in drenching downpour. The water front presented a very dull cheerless aspect, but in more ways

tiiin one position was far more inter-

osth;g tban has been at any previous

period of strike

There ivas an air of expectancy ivpryvfherp, and even strikers, in spite ■)f tbeii' apparent dejection, realised

that the new week marked the opening if a new era. Tbe strikers were pres-

ent in the vicinity of the Coronation Hall in greater numbers than has been ion c;ise for some days past, They exhibited no enthusiasm whatever and contented themselves with the usual futile discussions on strike news, but endeavoured to hearten one another with assertions that they were bound to win in the dim and distant future

They regarded the morning activities on the waterfront with more or less stnrliecl. indifference, but there wae little doubt that the coaling of the Pateena by tbe collier Karamo, aud the berthing of tbe big tramp steamer Northern added to their depression. Many of tbe strikers were kept busy for pome hours removing goods jand chattels of tbe Union from the Coronation Hall, which, under im-hnclions from Lyttelton Harbour Board, has to be vacated by 5 p in. today.

Something of a surprise was sprung on the port, and especially on the strikers, this morning when the collier Karamu came in from the stream to coal tbe ferry steamer Pateena. With geven or eignt other colliera the Karamu has been anchored in the stream for nearly a fortnight, but the supply in hulks having run short it was> decided to load tho Pateena direct from the collier. Accordingly, eteam waa raised, aud tbo Kurarau came in about 6 30 a.m. and made fast along side the Pateena and got her gear

ready for work, which was started at 8 a.m. by the Union Company's permanent men. Tbe Pateena did not need very much coal, but good work was done, and the job was finished about 11 a.m., wb9n the Karamu wbs hauled acros3 and berthed at No. 3 wharf. The work was not interfered with in any way. The permanent men j toiled cheerfully all through the heavy I downpour of rain, and the strikers kept clear of the wharf altagetber. The Pateena has been hauled , off a few feet .from tbe wharf as a precautionary ' tionary measure after coaling was finished, and tbe officers and deck hands were cheerfully splashing about in bare feet while they washed decks It was announced last weok that no attempt would be made to work on j the wharves b9fore Wednesday, but a j diversion was caused on the waterfront when the big tramp eteamer Northern, which arrived in the stream on Saturday morning from Hew York via way ports and Wellington was berthed this morning. The Northern, which is the first oversea steamer seen in port for three week?, was brought in by Pilot Hunter. Although she was in very light trim, and there was a strong north east wind blowing, she again berthed without loss of time. Once again the strikers kept clear of tbe wharf, and only those actually concerned with the mooring of the big ship were present

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19131118.2.6.1

Bibliographic details

THE STRIKE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXI, Issue 4350, 18 November 1913

Word Count
1,044

THE STRIKE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXI, Issue 4350, 18 November 1913

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