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POSITION AT DUNEDIN.

MEN TIRED OF STRIKE.

Dunedin, 10 10 a m

The wharves are almost deserted, and tbe Strike Committee had no news of any kind to communicate. The men seem to be tired of the whole affair, and many would prefer to be at work again. Some of them who have wives and families are feeling the

pinch.

NEW UNION INCREASES.

The new Union now promises to have a strong membership. The officers are working away quietly, and have not been molested in any way during the past few days They are gradually coming out on top, and work will be resumed he. v 9 next week for certain.

OTHER UNIONS FIRM.

None of the other Uoions have given the question of coming out serious thought,

INTEREST IN STRIKE DEAD. Interest ih tbe strike generally i B

very dead. The men themselves rea lize that it n neariog the m<3 Tbe arte?t of tbe Federation leaders is a big set back to them.

AUTHORITIES ACTION APPROVED.

Dunedin ci generally bail the action of the authorities with satisfaction, and are waiting for the next move, which they hope will com letely smash the Federation.

TWO STEAMERS ARRIVE,

Lyttelton, 10.20 a.m.

The dull move on the waterfront was broken to a great extent this morning by the arrival of two steamers, and the ferry wharf preĀ« sentfid a much busier appearance than for some days peek. Otherwise the port was quiet and lifeless, the beggarly array of deserted wharves giving the harbour a very depressing appearance.

The first arrival was the intercolonial liner Manuka, which came into port about 7 o'clock from Melbourne via Hobart, Bluff and Dunedin. There was only a very email crowd on the wharf when she berthed, the hour being somewhat early.

A few pickets and other strikers were interested spectators of the landing of the passengers, mails and lug gage, but there was no comment or demonstration of any kind. No cargo was worked by the Manuka, which was lying ide all day, She will sail this evening for Sydney, via Wellington, on the arrival of tbo 5 25 p.m. train from Christcburch.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AMBPA19131114.2.7.6

Bibliographic details

POSITION AT DUNEDIN., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXI, Issue 4349, 14 November 1913

Word Count
358

POSITION AT DUNEDIN. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXI, Issue 4349, 14 November 1913

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