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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

The instruments at the Domain weather station last night recorded four degrees of frost.

A magnificent -specimen of potato was shown to a " Guardian " reporter tcnday. The .sample, which was of the Dakota variety, and turned the scales at 41b IoK, was grown by Mr James Coehrane, Wakanui.

Local patrons :■-of His Majesty's Theatre will be pleased to learn that the New Zealand Picture Supplies Company has agreeoV_to provide upholstered seating acc^»arf33Ation, for t>he upstairs, portion of the building. It. is the intention to transfer the s^ats now in use upstairs to the front- portion of the building downstairs.

From "The Times" (London) Personal column of March 25 :—"Haunted or Disturbed Properties.—A lady, who has deeply studied this subject and possesses unusual powers, will' find out the history of the trouble and undertake, to remedy it. Houses ; with persistent bad luck can. often be freed from the influence. Strictest.confidence. ' .Social references asked and offered;" '..'■■" ;, ■ : :

Observant London playgoers $re watehinj; with amusenient the move-^ mepts of. the dembbilised actor. Ho has. for tho. moment, lost all grac© of, pose and ease of. movement on the fiitace. He marches, and he halts. Probably the next Romeo will take six oaces to the centre of the stage, clickhis heels, turn to the right, take six paces to the balcony, salute, and stand to attention ! ' ..:-.-■

"Some fell by the", wayside,"; was the reply of a motorist to a query, as.to the origin of certain rabbits' sticking out of his tool box. In fact.they had been potted from the seat of the mo.tor car while it was travelling ay a fair pace. "Some fell upon stony, (places," said another shootist ' from Ruapuna and "some fell among thorns"; capped a farmer from the Hinds river.

Indications of the existence of intelligent life on Mars are provided in discoveries by .a group of noted astronomers, now made public by Professor William Henry Pickering, brother of the late Edward Pickering, the Harvard' astronomer. Professor Pickering's report reveals the presence of polar ice, which melts in southern portions that are characterised by a brilliant red colouring and many indications of seasonal changes. On the planet 131 canals hare been positively identified, as well as 14 lakes.

When the police searched a. dock labourer as he was leaving the Royal Albert Docks, London, they found on him 485 silver medallions, a silver butter dish, and two pairs of socks. Somo of the medallions were EoTlceated in a specially made flannel belt round the maii's body, others were fastened round the salves of his legs and in his pockets. The butter dish was in an inside coat pocket, and the socks were wound round the man's waist. Prisoner, who said he bought the articles from a man he did not know, was remanded on a charge of unlawful possession. • >*♦•■'■

A Ruapuna resident remarked to a "Guardian" reporter yesterday that there were an increasing number of soldiers returning to the district. He suggested that as the Government owns land in the vicinity, they should give returned soldiers the first chance of obtaining any leases that might fall,in. He knew of a 100-acre section that had been re~l#t to a civilian quite recently, which might reasonably have first been offered to a returned man, for whom the property would have been admirably suited. If the men desired to stay in their home district where "they were known, every effort should be made to enable them to do so.

A further development in the Mackenzie Country is understood to be the proposed subdivision of 80,000 acres of Crown land into four grazing runs, to be thrown open for selection by returned soldiers. ? There are several other Canterbury settlements which will be made available for soldiers shortly, notably a block of approximately 800 acres at Orari, the area of the Coldstream Estate, which was purchased, and the recently-acquired 200 acres at Fendalton, the' last-named of which is intended for fruit and poultry farms. Single sections in the Hoinejbrook and Leeston sections are to be balloted for in about a month's time.

It is stated that the Natal Provincial Council intends to purchase land in Northern Natal and Zululand to provide 105 allotments qi from 400 to 700. acres each for the settlement of returned soldiers.

Motor Car Bargains.-—-The following ears are ,now available at G. H; Carson's Garage, Tailored Str<*et, next H.M. Theatre: 1912 Ford Touring Car £110, do. £120, do. £135, do. 1916 model; £150; Ford Runabout 1928 model £175; Saxon Runabout, with Self-Starter and Electrio Lights,' "as good as now, £200; Saxon Runabout £175. ' 5

" Mayfiold Resident " contributes an article on Mayfield affairs in the Open Column, puge 2, of this issued In the .report' of .the meeting of the Anama Road Board, which appeared in the "Guardian", on Monday, May 12, in the JL4th line from the bottom of the first column,' the word "rubbish" .should Have. read ' 'rabbits.'' In replying to a request at Nelson for a 'continuous telephone service, the /fion. W D. S. Mac Donald, Acting-Pdstmaster-Gene;ral, "stated that there : was .an erroneous impression that the iPbst and Telegraph was a paying pro-j-position; but'] it was .nothing of the. [sort if depreciation and sinking fund i were taken into consideration. But as : facilitating'- business the Post and Telegraph was an immense profit. . Accommodation in Hamilton is very difficult to obtain at present (says, an Auckland paper), and except at hotels, , where permanent board is not required, jit is almost impossible for visitors to. ! find lodging. The boarding-houses are filled, and people wlio want board and lodging .with private families, are unable to obtain it. So acute has the position become that instances have occurred of ; persons offering to taTie up domesticduties in order to .have a roof over .them. An amusing incident, illustrative of unwillingness of many landladies to I accept girl boarders, occurred recently'in Dunedin. A young girl interviewed a prospective landlady, ' and was informed that the house was full and that she could not be accommodated. Feeling suspicious, she went to a slot telephone box. called up the same house, and, assuming a gruff, manly voice, repeated her request for lodgings, indicating that she; belonged to the male sex. She was at once ac- | cepted, and cordially invited to move ' in at once:' Sh'e'snoiled the -climax of a good joke by.her failure'"to return to the landlady and" take justifiable re-! venge by. the.exposure of her ruse. Rats must' still be very plentiful, about Auckland, states the! "Star." A reporter's attention was called recently-;i in an auction mart to a. case of per- v simmons which had only just been de- i Hvered by steamer after a. snort, trip \ in the harbour. -At each edge, where j the' fats could get their noses in, the.! fruit' was eaten. "This is the case,".; said the auctioneer, "wltK, fruit if it comes -by coastal steamer or is,left in | the railway goods shed. We have had.| case after case of apples and tomatoes i destroyed this way. .It is not the pulp j so much as the pips, in the apples that ) the rats are after. - They also appear j very fond of seeds in tomatoes and i passion fruit." In the interests of the I whole community ' something like a i united rat destruction campaign should j be arranged throughout New Zealand j on a given date. '...:,. I

At'-the Addington stock market yesterday: the folloAving sales were made on behalf of owners in the- Ashburtqn County:—Fat Cattle—For T. Bowling (Methven). 8 steers at ,£ll lOTto £12 12s 6d. 8' steers at £11 7s 6d to £14. Fat Sheen —Wethers: For Hellyer Bros. (Eiffelton), 180 at 34s lOd to 37s lOd; E. Booker (Methven), 13 at 37s 3d: J. Dolan (Methven), 151 at 28s lOd to 31s. Ewes: For W. Anderso'n (Fairton), 69 at 27s 9d to 32s 4d; A. Hewson (Ashburton). 57 at 25s 9d: to 29s 6d; E. Booker {Methvon),,73 at,245.5d to 28s Id: J. McLean (Cairnbrae),. 130 at 22s 3d to 26s lid; C. O'Sullivan (Mitcham), 68 at 25s to 25s 8d; J.. Hibbs (Methven). 115 at 235. od to 25s 6a". Fat Lambs—For T.. Gilpin (Ashburtori), 210 fit 25s 8d to 26s 6d; J. King (Ealing), 299 at 21s 3d to 25s lid; E, Booker (Lvndhurst), 56 at ,22s lOd to; 255. 8d;. H. Druramond (Lyndhurst), 149 at 19s. 2d to 22s 7d.

At'• the Addington stock market yestei'dav: the folloAving sales were niiide. on behalf of owners in the- Ashburtpn County:—Fat Cattle—For T. Bowling (Methven). 8 steers at ,£ll lOTto £12 12s 6d. 8' steers at £11 7s 6d to £14.

A'farewell concert was given to the inmates of Tuarangi Home last evening by Mr and Mrs Robert Frizelle and party. Items were given b^ Mr anil Mrs Frizelle, Mrs L. G. McDonald, Miss Galbraith, Mr A.. Todd, McDonald's orchestra, and ■ the Ashburton County Pipe. Band. During the even-' ing tTio inmates presented Mr Frizelle with a handsome liqueur stand, and several made eulogistic references to; Mr Frizelle's unfailing interest in them and to' the many pleasant evenings' he; had been instrumental in giving them/ adding their best wishes for 'his-future success. Mr Frizelle, in response, thanked the inmates very feelingly for their good wishes and the tangible evidence of their esteem. Supper and the singing of " Auld . Lawg Syne .7' brought a pleasant gathering to a* close, •

The prompt application of knowledge gained as a Girl Guide has saved the life of Sir Ernest Shaclileton's 12-year-old daughter Cicely. The child, who is at school near Brighton, was out for a. walk with her . school companions, when she noticed an adder struggling in a bramble bush. She stopped to assist the reptile to free itself, but it bit her on the arm. Remembering what she liad been taught as a Girl Guide, she promptly sucked the wound. She was then, taken as quickly as possible to a doctor. By this fime her arm had swollen greatly, and for two hours her life was in danger. Lad 3* Shackleton was summoned hastily from Eastbourne. The doctors were able to overcome the effects of the poison, but it is stated there would have been no hove if the child had not sucked the wound.

"At the time I was there," said Lieutenant-Colonel N. S. Falla, of Dunedin. when discussing conditions in Germany, "the people struck me as beinec unaware of certain salient facts. They seemed, oblivious of the fact that they had started the war, and were inclined to rail against a hard fate. Indeed, in spite of the'khaki garrison, many of them did not even seen? to realise that they had lost the war, and it was evident that throughout • its course they had been consistently misinformed. However, they were beginning to learn of the chaos that reigned in other parts of Germany, and seemed erlad to have the Allied soldiers present to preserve order. Most of them looked a bit thin and peaked* and with conversation with them 1 formed the idea that they had suffered infinitely more privation than the English". However, their habit of obedience to authority had kept them from open revolt. A few of the better class preserved a dignified aloofness in their dealings with the conquerors, but most of the people bubbled over with friendliness, and the difficulty was to repulse their overtures. Even the language difficulty was a smaller bar to communication than, might have been expected, since almost all of the Rhineland Germans seemed able to sneak French, and many of them English." I ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ■■'■'■„..•■\';.""\' To prevent a oold ■ getting hold of you," take "KAZOL" on suear, or inhnh it at intonate. Its effects are ■ simply m&irettotw .'

" It is expected thai the next large European and Ex]>editionary Force niail 1 for New Zealand will arrive by the Moana, which, is due at Wellington i about May 28 from San Francisco. Mr Ben Turner provoked long laughter at a labour conference in Lon- ! don by attributing "uneasiness in the j country " to the fact that " they read ! accounts of'a wedding and of 79 night--dresses for one woman when some : hadn't one." The GjjovernmentJVleteorologist's forecast for to-day was as follows:—The ; indications are for northerly moderate ito strong winds, backing by west to south. Weather probably cold and changeable. The night will probably .be-very cold. The barometer has a falling tendency, but barometer rising shortly.. j It will probably come as a surprise to nianv that a scientist of such standing as the Hon. G. M. Thomson chisses belief in water-rdivining as one of the ignorant popular errors that persists merely for lack of a little scientific training. lii. the course of his ■ presidential address to the Otago Institute on Tuesday night he remarked tfhat he had even heard of hospital boards., "wisest, surely, of all ligneous, structures," employing a water-diviner to locate a source of water for them. " This." he said, " is one of the heresies.. '■ that dies hardest, yet it is as great a myth as the-long-believed power of the ; moon to decompose fish or twist the facial muscles. Both are largely- be-!

lieved in still. ! Sidney Drew, the popular film comedian, died suddenly from heart trouble in New York on April 9, aged 54 years Mr Drew was in New Zealand some 20 years ago with his first wife. Gladys : Rankin, daughter of McKee Rankin, I who visited New Zealand with Nancr O'Neill. Mrs Drew died in 1914, ana , their son. who was also a film actor,/ i was killed in France last May while servinc with- the •' French Aviation' ! Corps. On July 25, 1914,. Mr -Drew married Lucille McVey, . a ■■■'■ concert .sineei". with whom he appeared^-in-;:tli«" . Drew.*film comedies and latterly on the staael y He was a brother of .Toh^ Drew, the famous actor, and uncle of Ethel Barrvmore and her brother* Lionel and John, and was n member ofone,, of the most distinguished theatrical families on the Enslish-sp.eaking stage. A soldier's 'opinion of the jrelative value of the ..various military ..decora*., tiohs was expressed in Melbourne recently by the State Commandant. (Brigadiei'-General Brand). For a \yhile. said..: General Brand, the D.S.O. heldj^tß yaliie as the reward of valour, hut later hi'the war " people in the. back areas" hegan<to. get them, and 50 per cent, of the decorations lost their value. 'The Military Cross, had a similar experience! , The two. decorations which had kept their, worth throughput were the - V.C. and l D.C.M. ■ (Cheers.) They had all been won In close touch with the -enemy;' A D:C.M. was f a second-class y.C.,' and 95 out of every 100 Military Medals' were' third-class V.C.'s. (Cheers.) •• - ■ ' '. ■';■.

li^om Bariard, a small dairying townshio near Mansfield, Victoria, comes a story of determination.to "do his bit" on the part of a young Australian." Ray Lancaster, aged 11. earned £6 by milk,ine 10 of liis father's cows every morn■ine and evening and by catching'rabbits in his spare • moments school hours and milking time. Advice to put the money in the'savings bank .or into .war bonds was disregarded, and the whole sum. was paid by the boy into his. school fund for soldiers' tobacco, for which ho...originally.set out to save. The'soldiers .w.anted ttSbacco, he -said, and war bonds would not buy ,it for them. ' . . ', ■'..'■'.. . ■■■"■■'.■.■

A Hokikika' Press Association message states:—Representatives from Canterbury and Westland are conferrine at Otira to-day regarding means and measures to accelerate the Arthur's Pass (unnel works. An inspection of the through route is being made. The Canterbury visitors will stop over till Saturday, when they return with the Minister of Minesi who will be interviewed on the .works. —'The Mining Conference is being continued to-day. Yesterday several papers,'prepared .on various aspects of mining, were discussed, and- a number of resolutions passed suggesting various reforms,to assist the promotion of goldmining. The resolutions are to be presented to the Minister of Mines to-night by a public deputation.

Two raids oil East End gambling dens were made by the police late on Saturday night, and as a result over 40 men were fined at Old-street Police Court, (says a London exchange). It >-as stated that the principal raid was at Bethnal Green, and was made owing to complaints by the wives of the "frequenters," all of whom, instead" of being bound over, were fined 40s each. In this case it was stated that when the police entered the premises in Thepanstreet 50 men were found playing faro. They were so engrossed in the game that they did not notice a police in- ' spector until he said, ".Good evening, 'gentlemen;" Then there was a scramble, in which a man named Borinski fell from 'a wall arid broke his leg. In | a bedroom there was a display, of fried j fish, and oranges and mineral waters. When the prisoners were charged over £150 was found amongst them., Joseph Krastohick, as principal, was fined £200 or five months' im;prisonment; Maurice Liehstein was fined £25 or one month ; five other men were fined £5 each, and 36 frequenters 40s each.

. It has recently been discovered that alcohol can be extracted from kelp or seaweed in quantities sufficiently large to make it probable, at least, that the manufacture would pay its way as a commercial undertaking.

Altogether 14 attempts have been made on the lives of Lenin and Trotsky since the proclamation of the Bolshevik Government.. Nine at-' tempts were directed against Lenin and five against Trotsky.

The United States of America, with\ an area 25 times greater than the area of. Britain, and a population more than twice as gi-eat, produces about half the world's coal, whilst Great Britain pro-' duces a quarter. Thus tho two great i!<nglish-speakm£ countries produce between them three-fourths, or. in other words, three out of every four tons of coal used in the world.'

iu6^™*™*^ M pWlosophert- say, lhat Where tlwre's a will there's a way." 'T* j *^c *ecre* °f business success, And it conies to our,aid in distress, When illness or danger assails Or when we've hard times to endure r ') ™iU .J" our double- avails ' ' ljfko Woods' Great Peppermint' Cure

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190515.2.15

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9610, 15 May 1919

Word Count
3,011

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9610, 15 May 1919

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