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Ashburton Guardian Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1919. LEAGUE OF NATIONS.

The official summary of the peace terms imposed upon Germany was so lengthy, that many must have found it difficult to devote the necessary time and attention to a study of the published particulars, and will be content to base their verdict upon the comments of recognised authorities. In this respect, th.eir choice will be simplified, because the peace treaty has been met by a chorus of approval from all parts of the British Empire. Comments in the leading Dominion newspapers are favourable, and the leading English journals praise with very faint damns... When such a result is secured, the Peace Conference delegates may well flatter themselves that the result of their labours has been worth while. Fuller consideration of , the terms imposed aipon Germany show little.'.lacking that was practicable, and the enormous field covered is itself a tribute to those responsible. Without going into the individual merits of the Allies ? demands, it is. plain that Germany is faced with, a terrific task if' she is ever *to pay her debts, and to lay the foundations of future advance. She can never, unless the. very unexpected happens, become the menace to the world's peace that, she was for many years before 1914, but if she accepts as cheerfully as she can the righteous penalties imposed upon her for her enormous crimes, she should be able to rise from her dead self to better things. This regeneration will take time, and the way of the transgressor will be hard, but as the London "Morning Post" aptly puts it: "A policy of kindness to Germany is a policy of cruelty to the Allies,", and this factor must be ever kept prominent in the future councils of the Allies. Germany's punishment is not nearly so heavy as her misdeeds, and any appeals for leniency should be regarded as treason to the cause of humanity. Even a casual perusal at the peace treaty's terms must convince all of the importance of the League of Nations, and support for this momentous departure in international administration is now a first duty. The League's constitution may not be perfect, all its decisions may not attract general j support, but it seems obvious that the best, and indeed, the only way, of enforcing the peace treaty terms on our past enemies, and, what is more important, of preventing future world-wars, is to strive to support, loyally, the

League's verdicts on any contentious matters placed before it. All should, be keen on realising the merits of the League, and be willing to pardon any defects, so long as its fundamental principles are maintained. International affairs have , so developed, that now, only a successful League of Nations can do what.is necessary to prevent disorder, which means chaos. The peace treaty is humanity's Magna Gharta, and derives its strength, not so nmch from the deposition of Prussianism, as from the establishment and enthronement of that international council, whose main duty will be to prevent the, strong becoming bullies, and to assist the weak to overcome their handicaps. ? As the League prospers or fails, so will mankind advance, or fall.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190510.2.10

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9606, 10 May 1919

Word Count
532

Ashburton Guardian Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1919. LEAGUE OF NATIONS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9606, 10 May 1919

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