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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

Cabinet agreed to the extension of the right to financial assistance to soldiers who left the Dominion before the scheme was in operation and who, beting unaware of" the schemes in exis-tence,-were unable to take advantage of; them. '

A Press Association message' from Grevmouth> states that two trucks of coal broke away at the State Mine this morning and ran down an incline, striking a - miner named" Muncaster, breakine one leg severely, besides bruising: him.

The annual convention of the Women's , Christian Temperance Union was opened at Napier yesterday. On Wednesday night the convention was welcomed by the local union. The BlayoT presided, and extended a welcome on ■behalf of;the citizens. At yesterday's session the secretary's report showed that there were now 105 branches.

The Secretary of the General Post Office (hats'; ;jreceiyed advice • from the ceiisorship^ authorities that; unless un-« foreseen circumstances prevent, tlie Press "Bureau in the United Kingdom vyill, be abolished at the end of -this/ *m6n'sv'an#'that'there will tiim- b©-ho 1 censorship on press- telegrams to or fromthe: 'United Kingdom.

An extraordinary demand for steerage passages to England is: reported in Melbourne, although'l there is'-no -means-, of satisfying--it. Tlie fare is £3 i7,.,where some" months ago it was £68. The Osterley, which' recently left Melbourne, is one of the few boats which has steerage accommodation. She; took 200 steerage- passengers, and it is- said that; her capacity in this direction could have been filled four times over. " .

If. as seems likely to be the case, spiritualism is the favourite craze of Society-iii the coming season, remarks the. .'.'Daily Chronicle;""' it, will have some .very, .distinguished dofenders, in addition to iliose whose names are already.?]*&fore the public. Some years ago, when. Mr Balfour was at the height of ivia political power, someone was scoffing afc spiritualism in his presence. " Your scepticism carries you too far," said Mr Balfour. "There'is nothing in political life as liknovv ii to be compared to the interest.^ tlic-i profound interest •' and significance of psychical research." .•..-.■'•■-.■..■■.■■..'. ■'■.■•■':■ ' ;

' At the r meeting. of. motorists at Methven last .evening, Mr A.. S. iClarkson, a member' of the council of |he Canterbury Automobile Association, intimated that .five, returned, soldiers had been encaeed.'until."Wednesday night taking a tally of "the motor-cars,'motor lorries, motor bicycles, bicycles; horse-drawn vehicles, etc., that had crossed the Selwvn River during the.six days previous. When the return's' Were made up by. scrutineers specially. appointed for the purpose, it was the intention of the Automobile Association to .approach the Government with some substantial facts and figures with a view to having n ~"niit made for the construction of a bridce over the river.

Some' "iJastings deer-stalkers. are reported to' have .made a remarkable "bag." Arising'in the early hours, amid the. grey mists, they saw the dim "-outline of a lordly stag against the sky, and a sure shot lay the noble beast low. Rearing £he : deadly v attacks' of these sb'urdV/'anataalsf when in their death extremity, the sportsmen took the proper precaution of protecting themselves from his savagery by lodging a. coup de grace in! his still : heaving side. They then cautiously approached the quivering oarc««e-r-otily to find that they-had slaughtered ..their hired -but. faithful packhorse.-• who-.'had so. loyally carried their impedimenta "through their journey to.the hills. The sports are more or less.silent about their exploit, but the owner of the packhorse.is said to have imposed no lock upon his lips. - Exchange.

I.W.W. doctrines have apparently ■penetrated to the aborigines in the Northern Territory, says, the Melbourne " Argus " of a recent date. The Minister for Home and' Territories ' (Mr Glvnn) has received a report from the Methodist Mission, of Goulburn Island, which states that slightly over 100 natives are now in that, institution. Reexet is expressed, however, that a black named. Jimmy Nundal, who is described as> " an aboriginal 1.W.W., only more so." had induced five other boys from the dormitory to leave and "make corroboree." The removal of Jimmy Nundal is"said to have conduced greatly to the peace, good order, and good work generally of the institution. Jimtny, however, had escaped surveillance at Port Darwin, and was said to be working his way back to the station with the intention flif "getting even" with two other natives who had given evidence again.-st him. The report mentioned that there had been' rumours of massacrfesr of blacks on Rabuma Island, but that it had not yet been possible to investigate them.

Judging by the, following extract from a passenger's letter to a Sydney paper, the bugler on the Niagara developed his sense of humour whilst that vessel was in quarantine in Auckland harbour. The writer states: "'Happily' the ship's bugler has been-spared as vet. He sounds tlie calls for reveille and for; meals, and he adds, according to his fancy, well-known tunes which he considers appropriate to the occasion. For instance, when it was intimated that the period of detention was to be for 60 hours after the last case had made its appearance, he announced the decision by playing on his silver cornet, after the dinner-call, 'It May be for Years and it May be for Ever.' * And after the Minister for Public Health had wirelessed that the passengers would be landed on Motuihi Island the cornet player disseminated the intelligence immediately by baring out, 'We Shall Meet on That Beautiful Shore.' The disembarkation was fixed for yesterday (Sunday), and after reveille'the sluggards rubbed their eyes and smiled as they heard ,' Christians. Awake, Salute the Happy Morn.' There is a prophylactic value, in gaiety. Therefore all hone that the cornet player may long be spared."

Car Repair Service.—Motorists know how to appreciate prompt service. Especially is_ this service valued if the work is satisfactory and the price is. right. G. H. Carson's Garage is known throughout New Zealand as one of the most up-to-the-minute service stations, and charges are always moderate. Motorists who require their Cars repaired, whether the job is a small one or a-complete overhaul, will find that Carson's Service is prompt and. satisfactory. A large stock of Spare' Parts for Ford and Other Cars always maintained. 4

All the Canterbury rivers are reported clear tp-dav. : ; v. ■ -;

Satisfactory progress has been made with -the erection of the concrete bridses on the main Ashburton-Meth-ven Road near Methven. Two have been finished, and are now open to traffic, and the third is practically completed, but the approaches have not been filled in. Traffic in the meantime ia confined to a side track.

At Rotorua yesterday, Hakaraia Temohi, a motor driver at Wairakei Hotel, was committed for trial at Hamilton <on a charge of stealing £87 from the hotel safo between April 5 and April 8. The safe was locked on April 5, and opened on April 7, when the money was "--missed. ■ Accused wont to Taupo on April 14, and was flush of money, when he returned. Suspicion was aroused, and he was arrested.

Oh the subject of retrospective allowances in respect of the maintenance of wives and children oT soldiers on active service, the annual report of the Auckland Returned Soldiers' Association says: "The Government refuses to admit our claim in spite of the fact that the people "of New Zealand are solidly behind the returned ti'en in their demaiid' for" full retrospective allowances. 'Confident^ in the justice of our claim, r^e .mean; to carry it to a successful concla«ioii.''—^Press Association].

Unprecedehtett "prices 'are' being paid for winter faed iri Otago^and Southland. At Stirling a crop; of swedes grown on lanc| .which, .was und«fr water; during the big "flood Vome time^a'go was recently sb)d for £2l per 'acfeV '^Visitors from AshbUrton' tp the; South during Easier state that there" ''will be 'an jacute scarcity of winter. feed in those parts this year, the.limited area in root crops being /due to tlie long spell of wet weather experienced '.during the turnip50wing" season. . " '..','

A camera man, working for' the. official .propa'g'&nda department of a film company; after he had taken; sorhe film pictures on a farm met the'old farmer. "_1 have iustr been taking some moving pictures of* life on your farm," he said to the farmer. "Did you catch.' any of the men in motion ?" asked the farmer, curiously. "Yes, I did," replied the camera man. The old farmer shook his head reflectively, and then drawled. "Weel, weel, science is a wonderful thing 1" ' -

The Goro Borough Council recently appointed a local resident as town clerk, from several applicants who included some returned soldiers, at which municipal appointment the Returned Soldiers' Association was* incensed, and yvrote to individual councillors enquiring, how they voted. Several declared they, favoured a soldier candidate, but the.majority declined to disclose the voting, which iwas taken in!committee. The association passed a vote of censure on the council, also a motion that councillors, being servants of the public, should conduct their business in open council.—Press Association ;

Cabinet has .-Irgreed (says a Press Association telegram) to the publication of the names of military defaulters. Sir James Allen . states it is possible that some names of men respecting whom favourable recommendations have been received may not be included in the list. Every person whoso name is on the list will have the right to appeal to a Stipendiary Magistrate. As one of the punishments imposed by statute upon defaulters is deprivation of civil riphts for 10 yeaTs; if the list is published boforo April 30 none of' those whose names are listed will, have the right to vote at the coming local elections.

"The treatment of nurses at the Christehurch Hospital is the most scandalous thing in our human civilisation," said Mr J. J. Dougall in the course of his address at Sydenliam last night. They were treated more like slaves than human beings, he said. They were «young girls, and they could not live except that they were partly supported by relatives. Their pay ranged from £12 to £20 a year, out of which they must buy uniforms and do all kinds of menial work; they had to study hard, and eventually pass an examination needing a high standard of intelligence. Then they must work three or four years to qualify as nurses, and then they became entitled..to a maximum salary of £80 a year! It was not a credit to Christchurch, to the people, or. to our civilisation.

The question of inoculation against influenza was, discussed by Dr. Fearson, pathologist of the Ghristchurch Hospital, in replying to a question whether nurses ■ were being inoculated. "One; or two of us have been inoculated with the vaccine for experimental purposes," he said. '-'The experience has gone to show that the inoculation is not attended with any inconvenience." Dr. ■ 'Pearson said he had prey pared a mixed vaccine and had sufficient to deal with any extensive outbreak. It was necessary that those who came into close touch with the epidemic should take preventive measures, and it was desirable, therefore, that doctors, nurses 1 and others should bo inoculated. "We may look for a return of the influenza epidemic," he remarked, "but I do not anticipate a visitation of the explosive, type of a few months ago." ''" '' '''.:-.

Travelling by the evening train from Cbristuhurch to Ashburton is usually a quiet arid monotonous quantity, but a diversion was provided last evening by a passenger bound from the city to Dunsandel; Quartered among a score of gay racegoers, an argument' soon arose regarding real and imaginary knowledge possessed by the disputants. National aspirations of a higli order were revealed, and eventually one highly passenger, having failed to establish his claim to .wear the em-. blem of liis native land, proceeded to enforce his argument in the real Jack Johnson style. He was soon quelled, and held in restraint until Dunsandeli was reached, where he alighted and paraded the full length of the train, endeavouring to arrange a hurried "fight for a fiver" with the gamest Englishman on board. There were plenty on board game to stand for the dear old flag, but not in accordance with the newly-prescribed method, and as the train steamed out the irate passenger was endeavouring to sett-Dc the difference with the stationmaster, but along modified lines..

Following' the, cc>ld snap'yesterday afternoon arfroiit^t in ** night, the in-struments-at^theJ^ra^ w^jiher, station registering seven degrees. This is the hardest experienced so far this season. For the 24 hours- proceeding 9 a.m. to-day the instruments recorded 11 points of rain.

A number of -soldiers who returned by the Maheno proceeded to their homes by the south-bound express this afternoon. The. draft included several district soldiers, who were met at the station by the Mayor (Mr R. Galbraith) and.Mr Ferriman, and conveyed to their homes .in.''motor cars.

Late yesterday afternoon a motor cyclist was proceeding into East Street from Havelock Street, when the machine struck.the rear wheel of a bicycle ridden by; a little girl. The cycle wheel collapsed, but the rider escaped '' injury.

The Government Meteorologist's forecast for to-day was as follows:—The indications are for southerly winds, backing by oast to north. There is a prospect of fair to cloudy weather, with a hard frost' to-night. Barometer haa little movement.

The oris'n of the Maori race has always been a study of much interest. Perhaps it has been solved by an incident that occurred in England. A Maori soldier who had been in hospital was eivrn a week's leave, and at the end of the week ■ aoplied for an extension. He was a full-blooded [ Maori, and his 'reason for- -asking , for 1 more leave was that ho wished to-visit hi=i rolatires ■in the north of Scotland. , < ,

In connection with the annuai^general election of Road Board members, the follo'ivin£t'.candidates were nominated for the Upper Ashburton Road B6ard: — No. l.Wardv John.Farrell; No: 2'Ward, H, J.. C. Hatper; NovA Ward, Angus Horsey;; ■-No-Sf-Ward,. Joshua, Tucker; No, 6 Ward,,, James.. Allen. c :."A;b the number <jf candidates did not! exceed the munber re{tuir.ed t , the fpregding'' vrere-; declared f duly,,iejeotQd- Lan^try;:Magin^ nejvs «sn.rl .A^illiam..,T! Lill beiiig.;th^ '■ bnlyl Randidsiies,' fps.^ff.p. 1. and sfo:;;'3'; Wardr-r respectively, ori,- the Lorigbeach - Road" Board, were also declared : elected.

With theJatest'list of V.C.'S (stated a London report in January) tho number of recipients qi the.highesfc- honour to be. gained on ihe battlefield reaehen 600 for the campaign, in addition to the ..tw^o .bars awarded to officers who, had previously won the decoration., This total compares with 522>bestowed in the. previous, half-century, and pro-

vides an., indication of the^epic nature of the fighting.,'', It".js v probfible that the r011..0f tho.~ great war's heroes k hot \-et complete, .though most of the deeds outlined in the new list weiv performed during the final weeks of .hostilities. ■ -rThe. Lancashire Fusiliers has l'etained its proud position of having gained- more: awards "For Valour'; than any otheE .individual . regiment, with a totat of 47 ; the. Royal .Fusiliers, tho. Rifle Brigade, and the Yorkshires tying for second, place with 10 each.

Apple profiteers are being brought to book in the English police courts, most of them uhderv .the old Order which fixed the maximum price for stated sorts and sizes of apples at 8d per lb. Francesco Dallamuro, Pimh'co, charged with selling: such apples at 2a 6d per lb, was fined £2 and a guinea. costs. Nathaniel Field,., who charged Is 9d per lb, said that,he was under the impression that ■the.. .Order-, applied to- ; cooking.!,, apples only..', JFined.. £1, and' a '.guinea * cosi^.' Israel SweritsKy was fined ■ "£S~I or imposing a condition on the sale of apples. He refused to ..sell apples unless nuts arid oranges . were .. bought. ' These offences were in London. At Brighton. William Harry Marsh was fined £60 for selling apples above the maximum nrice. He was said to have had 250 bushels, and if he had sold, them all at the Drice he asked he would have made an illicit profit of £800.

During the war period, the number of the daily papers in the United States and outlying territories remaine<J"practically the same. At the beginning of 1914 2483 daity papers were published. That year saw an increase which brought the total tip to 2502. In 1916 the. number was 2494. Then an increase of 20, at. the beginning of 1917, which made. the..,.high-water mark of 2514. The records for 1918 show the effect of the country being at war, the number of dailies decreasing first to 2455, and then, .to 2428, the present number. The total for all publications for the United States and itV territories, 22,977, in 1914, moved up to 23,887 in 1917, and down to 21,664 this year. Weekly papers show a decrease from 16.266 of 2000; but the monthlies, 2879 in 1914, remained the same for a year, and then climbed until last year there were 3261.. The past year saw 200 taken from,that figure. In 1914 there were i 163 ' dailies in Canada and Newfoundland. The total*became smaller each »year. • Now only 134 -ai'e published there.: lx ■ •'■'■•■

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9594, 25 April 1919

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2,815

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9594, 25 April 1919

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