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PARES FASHIONS.

Writing from Paris, a correspondent of the "Gentlewoman" says': "You can hardly move, in the Paris streets. They are thronged with the people of every nation. There seems comparatively few French about; so. great is the crowd of Americans from the North and South Continents,' of English, and some Italians, with a sprinkling of Spaniards, Portuguese, . and Swiss. Once you are within the walls of the Hotel Majestic the scene is wholly British. The English members of the Peace Conference housed there actually took with them utensils and materials for cooking, etc., and, believe mc, their very coupons! English policemen are there, splendid as ever, coping with a multitude of intruders and non-in-truders. Mr Lloyd George, cheery, if bothered; Mr Balfour, affable, if a little weary; our distinguished Indians—alT come and go through the doors of the Majestic. Now as to frivolous Paris. What strikes one most is that the women who dress to the fashions are less freakish to look at than our women at home. Those who have passed a certain age do not go about as ours do in impossibly tight short skirts, looking like so many storks. Nowhere do you see such ridiculous femininities in the Champs Elysees as in Piccadilly. As to the fashions, they are flying from a tangent. In the spring the frocks are to be anything in the world but military mannish; frills, furbelows, and fripperies are to reign triumphant.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190424.2.28

Bibliographic details

PARES FASHIONS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9593, 24 April 1919

Word Count
240

PARES FASHIONS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9593, 24 April 1919

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