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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

The following is to-day's river report: —Rakaia, dirty; Ashburton and Opihi, clear; Itangitata and Waitaki fishable.

J. J. Slijn, one of the Germans who escaped from the internment camp at Featherstoh, was recaptured at. Martinborough. .

The Winchmore Sunday School children and parents held a picnic on the Domain Oval yesterday. What would otherwise have been a most enjoyable outing was marred by the rain in the afternoon.

The instruments at the Domain weather station at 9 o'clock this morning recorded 29 points of rain for the preceding 24 hours. A light frost was experienced early this morning, the instruments registering one degree.

Oscar Wilhelni Nelson, a seaman, about. 36 years of age, shot himself with a revolver at Auckland on Saturday evening. He had been depressed for some time, and had threatened to kill himself previously in the presence of a woman. At the inquest a. verdict of suicide was returned.

:A;.strange : tragedy is reported from Rome;, Twin brothers, , John, and Joseph Tocci,: who were /conjoined like the Siamese twins, 'accumulated a small fortune appearing, at. circuses.. They were separated by a. surgical, pp-' elation-and; bought a ; farm, - Many business quarrels .ended inj a .desperate fight with knives, as a result of which Joseph was stabbed to • death and John seriously..wounded. The latter was, arrested. nw<<7 .•„ •; ■■.-,..'.■

A- Press ; Association , telegram from Pvotorua states that iihe post. office, ( there was broken into <j>n Sunday night! and yesterday morning! the sate .was,, found open and unlocked. ' Two Casir boxes, one ' containing about £500 in cash and cheques and unissued postal notes, and the other £50- largely in stamps, were missing. The former, with contents intact, T,vas> found under a tree in adjoining premises covered with empty benzine tins. There are no clues to the perpetrators. '""'.'

The inquest touching the death of Hezokiah Walter James Turner, who died in the Midland Billiard Parlours in Wellington on the evening of April 10th, a revolver bullet haying entered his skull, was concluded oh Saturday! Mr F. V. Frazer, S.M., gave a verdict that death was due toscerebral destruction arid hemorrhage, caused by '■a bulletdischarged from a revolver then in the possession of one Martin, and that at the time of discharge the deceased was endeavouring to obtain possession _ of the revolver.

■ A Gore resident had a miraculous escape from, either death or serious injury on the journey home.by Monday evening's express (states _ the 7 •.' 'Ensign) About a couple of miles on the south side of Milton, with the train _going at top speed, the passenger referred to was jolted off the train through one of the doors which had been left open. After travelling about a mile the train was pulled up, and the first passenger to reach the spot where tlie man had fallen off found him unharmed, sitting on the side of the line apparently waiting for the next train.

A /severe storm occurred, at Fiji;:on March 28 last. The island of Kancia suffered considerable damage, the cocoanut trees in some of the, gullies being wiped out v On tho hills the trees, which were beariup- heavily, also suffered severely. The crop that would have fallen about the end of June and July is all down. Tlie nuts are too young to make up for copra. The cutter Turagabui was totally wrecked at Moaal. The Kataogo, a vessel of 12 tons, which drifted from Wainyabia, Lakeba, with four of a crew and a natiye captain, has not been heard of since.

At the inter-university debating contest, at Dunedin, the speakers were: — Auckland—G. T. Bellhouse and C. J. Garland; Otago—A. B. Kilroy and.W. J. P. Morrell; Canterbury—A. Paterson and J. C. Dickinson; Victoria—E. Evans, and W. E. Leicester. The ?subiect was:—"Thatthe League of Nations is necessary to promote the moral and economic welfare of mankind." After two hours' keen and interesting disputation the judges declared the following result:—Victoria College 1, Auckland 2. Canterbury and Otago (equal) 3.

In the course of his speech at : the soldiers' welcome home at Otaki, Major Buck referred to the intrepidity of the Maoris' ancestors.; .He stated that there was> a carefully-preserved record among the Maoris of the wonderful adventures of a venturesome voyager. He sailed to the dark seas in a canoe, away down- to the Antarctic, where there were wonderful monsters of the. deen. That was about the year 650 A.D. Another-man set out some 200 years after to verify the story of this voyage, and left records of the Antarctic which had been verified. by the discoveries of later centuries. These stories. Major Buck said, proved "the prowess and venturesome spirit of the Maori ancestors. '',','

Passengers held up by the Niagara's detention found relief from the monotony of their enforced idleness in tackling arrears of their private correspondence (says the Auckland "Star"). So considerable was the virtuous wave that swept over the ship's company that all available stamps, amounting to almost £20 worth, were quickly requisitioned. The fever not being exhausted, the stream of letters continued to find its way to the office accom-. panied by the humble penny. To those who were pluming themselves on a long-neglected duty well performed it came as a very unpleasant shock to learn one, morning that a neatly-tied bundle of 100 unstamped letters written by passengers, had been picked up on the beach. The mystery of how they found then- way into the sea to be eventually washed up on the shore instead of arriving safely at the post, has not yet been solved to anyone's satisfaction.

A Press 1 .Association ' telegram states .that Sir James Allen has received a telegram from the High Commissioner stating that the Admiralty cannot give a. "definite date for the demobilisation of the.'motor-boat patrol, but it will take place, as .early as possible.

Provision is made by a Gazette Extraordinary for securing a supply of butter for local consumption during the winter. If necessary butter will not be permitted to be exported - should, doing so trench upon the supplies required to meet domestic needs. ,

At the annual householders' meeting at Ealing there was a good attendance. Seven' nominations were received, with the result that the following schooll committee was elected:—Messrs J Butiand, J. Johnston, B. Withell, E. Sawle, and A. Wallace. Mr "Wallace was re-elected chairman.

A prisoner, named Charles Edward Bolton escaped from Mount Eden gaol yesterday afternoon, says a Press Association telegram from Auckland. The escapee was working in a quarry outside the gaol wall and eluded the vi silance' of the warder. Bolton was serving a month's imprisonment for theft and vagrancy, and was to have been dealt with to-day on a warrant for maintenance.

Writing to the Auckland "Star," a returned soldier states: There are Auckland-merchants still offering and selling German goods. They claim that/ the goods were bought and stocked previous" to ■ the war, but are obtaining" the highest prices obtainable,' a form'iof' exploitation of the public with enemy-goods'. The imports should be - more closely watched to check'any possible'imports of, goods of' enemy country origin-.

Strange finds are sometimes made in the intestines of 'animals slaughtered at the city abattoirs. Nails of all kinds, wire .'tacks, .and pins, are met with every day, but this week the find was unique.' A young heifer was found'to have i swallowed a Bank of New Zealand: ten-shilling .note, dated V/ 1915. The note .was almost a new one, and •in'':'-.a • good state '*of preservation.— (Dunedin <!Star.'?> '.. -

The - Maheno, arrived at Auckland this morning with 22 officers, 4 nurses, and 366 other ranks. She brought the last of Newt Zealand invalided soldiers She sailed with 250 cot cases, which were reduced during the voyage to 55. Few cases on board are very serious, Five deaths occurred on the voyage, 'namely: Lance-Corporal G. Graham, (Awahuri), Private T. Renfrew (Auckland), . Private T. O'Connell (Christchurch), and . Driver P. P. Johnston (Gisborne). The latter, was given a military funeral at Colon; the others were, buried at sea. j The GovernorGeneral visited the ship on its. arrival here.—Press Association.

Easter has passed without incident, so far as Ashburton is concerned. Oh Sunday special services- were conducted in the various churches^ and these were well attended. On Sunday afternoon, the visiting delegates in connection witn the Orange Lodge Conference,' and district brethren paraded- in full regalia to a special service in -the Theatre Royal. and the weather, being perfect, ,a large number turned put to witness the procession. Monday was exceptionally quiet in-'the town. In the forenoon a, number of holiday-makers were seen making their way by motor-cars and' lorries to the various picnic resorts, but the enjoyment of the outings was spoilt to a great extent by the light rain which commenced shortly before 3 o'clock and continued throghout the afternoon. ;■

Tlie manager of a Wanganui insurance office was subjected to a very pleasant surprise on Thursday (says the " Herald"). Some months ago he paid Out a pblicv of £100 on a fire which he had every reason to believe had destroyed a property belonging to a soldier client. The "loss-" was certified to by two representatives of the company and by the attorney of the soldier, all three being-honestly of opinion that the property destroyed was the one covered by the policy. : On Thursday the soldier, who recently returned from active service, walked into the office and tendered a cheque for "£IOO,, whicji, he declared, had- been erroneously paid over to his attorney. Subsequent explanations showed that there had been an accidental "mix-up" of policies on two adjoining properties, and that the house, destroyed by fire was not the one "covered" by the policy. ■ <■■

The Zeppelin is declared by Lieu-tenant-Colonel Vere Bettington, D.S.Q., Aeronautical Adviser to the Nevv Zealand Government, to have great possibilities as a peace-time carrier (says the "New Zealand Herald"). There was every prospect of the airship" being employed as a passenger vessel for trans-oceanic travel, he said, the.speed with which they can he driven making this mode of transit highly desirable. One of the great drawbacks experienced by .the Germans was the heed for constructing huge hangars foiV"- sthe' accommodation of the Zeppor lins, .which are approximately 700 feet in length. He believed; however, that iii future the structure of the airship would be Nsuch that it would be possible to moor them to. ( banding stages and anchor them in much ihe same way as is now done with sea-going vessels, allowing them to swing in the air currents.

The conditions in connection with the McFarlane Shield Competition for school gardens in the North Canterbury Education District have now been materially altered. Hitherto the shield was awarded to the school showing the greatest improvement in the year in the subject of agriculture, which, of course, includes 7 indoor and outdoor studies. Tlie result was that many teachers were practically debarred from winning, as the good work they had been doing for many years allowed but a small latitude for the required "improvement." The new conditions provide for prizes of £3, £2 and £1, for the greatest "improvement," but the shield is awarded not for "improvement," but for "best!' showing, thus allowing all scholars an opportunity. The marks are divided as followsi: —Appearance and educative value of school garden, 200 marks; knowledge of class of the current year's programme, 100 marks; note-books, diagrams, etc., 100 marks; originality, experimentation, etc., 100 marks: care of tools, 50 marks; total, 50 marks.

I've an antique, brass-bound cabinet Built in my bedroom wall, Wherein I keep—locked up, you bet— My'treasures great and small— My tobacco-jars and best cigars, .And gilt-edged literature; Likewise my cash and Trades Hall sash. And Woods' Great Peppermint Cure.

The southern contingent-of returning soldiers from the. ''Cormthic'; will leave Christchurch by special -train -to-mor- • row at 8 a.m.. and should arrive in Ashburton about 10 a.m. Cabinet has decided that Aiiaap Day this year shall be observed as y a full holiday. Nothing was decided as to its permanent observance in future years. —Press Association. ' An unusually large train load of fat sheep was brought down the Springburn line and sent on to the freezing works this morning. The consignment should help to relieve tho pressure on some of the farmers caused by the | shortage of feed. For the forthcoming election on April 30. for two candidates to represent this district on the Lyttelton Harbour' Board there will he 23 polling booths throughout the County, the head booth being* at the Borough Council office. Four candidates are at present in the field, but a rumour is current that two of those may withdraw. j There was heavy passenger traffic on the north and ssouth bound expresses to-day, and accommodation was somewhat* severely taxed when the trains left Ashburton, as a large number of delegates attending the Orange Lodge and the Church of' Christ Conferences returned to their, glomes this afternoon. ■; The excess traffic at the 1 Ashburton railway station during the recent holidays proves the urgent necessity for the proposed dock from which to despatch the Springburn and slow trains for Timaru. With the extra expresses running, the Timaru and Springburn trains had to be shunted in to the end of the platform near the ramp bridge, which the officials who deal with the traffic will readily- concede is a most inconvenient, place to board these trains. The construction of the dock would be a comparatively inexpensive item when compared with facilities it would provide for the travelling public.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190422.2.11

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9590, 22 April 1919

Word Count
2,239

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9590, 22 April 1919

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