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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

Tho htsnoisftifiMm of tl&. Mayor of Ha/nilton was the subject of a notice of motion .given at the Borough Council's last iiwjeting by Mr J. A. Young, M.P. Mr Young will propose at the next meeting that the honorarium, which as now £100, be increased to £150 ; per annum.

■Letters from the King Country say j that although they are getting more ; rain lately farmers think it has come j rather late to do imich good. Grass is \ not coming away as it should do at this j time of the year 'had the rains been j more copious. Calves are selling at a j very low price in the King Country just ■ now. i The Waihi Borough Council is being i -sued by an Auckland firm for an epi- I domic account amounting to £85 9s. j The Mayor states .that the Epidemic j Committee has no money, and that | nothing in this direction has been j forthcoming from tiie Government. He j had advised the- Minister of Internal j Affairs to this effect.

"The boys at the 'front are attending to the emigration question as far as^the ladies are concerned, and it is up to the Government therefore to go in for an emigration policy not only to overcome the- labour difficulty, but also to find hr "bands for the young ladies hereJ" This remark was made by a speaker at Wharigamoniona during the visit of Cabinet Ministers this week.

According to the Wellington "Times of Friday' last a writ has been served on Mr William D. Bayley, the Canadian Prohibition advocate, calling upon him to show cause why he should wit be proceeded against for criminal defamation. The matter arose out of a statement reflecting noon the loyalty and character p'f a returned soldier named Richard White, alleged to have been made at a public meeting at. Napier. A friend of mine (says a writer in the London "Daily Express") took his watch to be cleaned, and found that the shop assistant was a lad who was in his '.company, and had been invalided home. "If I were you, sir, he said, "I should take it back, wash it in ipetrdl, .and Jhang it up to dry. You'll find -that is quite a good way. That is !how a great many watches are cleaned nowadays, even if they are kept six weeks in the shop and the bill comes to half a sovereign." Mr Justice Sargant gently rebuked a counsel the other day, who. suggested that as the Judge, when at the Bar, had been engaged in a case concerning wireless telegraphy, it would | be unnecessary to go into details. "\ou ! had better start as if my mind ware a blank,' 'said the Judge. One of the most precious qualities an advocate can cultivate is the art of forgetting quickly what he has learnt. "If I remember all the facts in all the cases I have been in, what sort of thing would my head be now, do you think?" asked Lord Russell, of Killowen, of a trembling junior on a like occasion. Mr J>avid Low, whose appointment to a position on the London 'Daily News' at a princely salary, was recently announced by cable, is only 28 years of age. He is a native of Dunedin, and was contributing drawings to the Christchurch "Spectator" when only 11 years old. Mr Low, when in New Zealand, for a time studied fur the Church, but he did not pass the _ necessary preliminary examination owing to his inability to master -some of the intricacies of arithmetic. For some time he has supplied "The Bulletin's" weekly bulletin from Melbourne. Mr Low will loa.ve for London in August, the- contract he lias signed with the "Daily News" binding him to that paper for a term of years.

Mayor Ole Hanson, of Seattle, U.S.A., who quelled a rec-ent universal ■strike by prompt action, is a good business man, and ha-s accumulated a comfortable fortune. He has a beautiful home in Seattle's choicest residence district, and is represented in many of the city's leading business enterprises. He belongs to the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and Commercial Club, and at all times has been active in business counsels. He is a fighter who never compromises. As he says, "one cannot compromise with wrong. The. right thing is alwaj's the best thing to do." Hf> is a. coiner of phrases. Among his epigrams is: "A man who will not lea\ re his party for the good of his country should be forced to leave his country for the good of all parties."

The Sovereign State of Iceland, the ancient land of the Althing, from her icy fastnesses, 500 miles .to the north of the northern point of Scotland, wasi apparently waiting with interest the result of the general election in Great Britain. On New Year's Eve a London news agency received a telegram from the newspaper " Vidskiftabladid," of Reykjavik, asking that a summary of the election results- should bo sent to them. With those election results wired from the British capital went friendly greetings to the Icelanders, and cood wishes for the first year of a new era. an era when the aeroplane will bring neighbaurs closer together, and give to friends opportunities for being-more friendly.

A test action in the Chancery Division ended in a victory for love over an unsympathetic school authority, says a recent London paper. Miss Helen Martin, a young assistant mistress at an Eccles non-provided school, received a telegram from her soldier fiance, stating that he had been suddenly ordered to France and asking her to meet hjin in Manchester. She/obtained leave of absence from the headmaster. But the Eccles Corporation (the local education authority) .had made a regulation that except in the case of personal illness no teacher was to he absent without the nermission of the Education Committee or its secretary, and gave her a month's notice. Miss Martin now asked the court to say that the notice was inoperative. Mr Justice Yormeer declared the notice to be invalid and inoperative, nnd ordered the corporation to pay the costs.

The following is #«B river report for to-day:—llakaia, clear; Ashburton, clear; Rangitata, fishable; . Opihi, ctear; W&itaki, fishable.

One of the questions brought before the Minister for Education at Masterton was the necessity for having appli- ! ances handy in schools in case of acci- j dent or sickness. The provision of an ; ambulance outfit and clinical thermometers at each school'was urged. The Minister promised to give the matter his close consideration. j i Te custom of convicting and dis- ' charging those who, being charged with drunkenness, are "first offenders," was referred to by Mi- A. , | Crooke, S.M., in the New Plymouth I Magistrate's Court. His Worship said i he did not know why -tlris should be i done, that "a man should be let off be- , i cause it was his first offence, or, more j especially, because he was a "statutory first offender," through not having 1 been convicted in the preceding six i months. The magistrate said that in J future he did not intend not to fine j an inebriate merely because he did not i happen to have been convicted within ! the previous six months. , If a man : could afford to be drunk he could afford to pay a fine.

j As far as the coming Easter holidays ! are concerned. Ashburton will offer no ! attractions in the way of sports. The j business premises will be closed from j Thursday night until the Tuesday; ! morning, so that a number of ' local ! residents will no doubt visit other | localities. The races at Christchurch I will offer the -greatest attraction for sporting enthusiasts, while a number of ] local bowlers will also find their way ! to the city for the Easter tournament. ' A large influx of visitors is expectedi in Ashburton as delegates from various oarts of the South Island will coni- : mence to arrive to-morrow to attend I the Orange Lodge Conference. A con- : ference in connection with the Church ; of Christ will also be held locally. i A missing wife, carrying; with her ; some £2.000.000 worth of securities., I sounds like the basis of n cinematograph i drama, but, Kccording to the Xow York j "Tribune,'' the two figure officially iy i js\ matter which came before Sheriff j David H. Knott. From Palo Alto, in ] California, the. aggrieved-husband wrote i > to the sheriff that his wife had left i California with securities valued at I £2.000,000 in her possession, and other | valuable papers owned jointly by his | wife :>nd himself. He enclosed a checiue f*or £100, which was payable as a reward to the sheriff when the missing wife had been discovered. The-Letter wa=i so badly writen thnt part of it was illegible, and the only description given, of the wife was that she was sft oin in height, and sometimes known as "Sunny." Sheriff Knott sent back the cheque, and suggested the advisability of typewriting any further communications on the matter. "I am not one to despair, having won a victory abroad, that we shall fail to win victory at home,'"' said Father Bernard Vaughan in London recently. Among coming difficulties, he regarded with most apprehension the* decline, in the birth-rate. "We are building more coffins than cradles," lie said, "aiul we are up against a most tremendous question in the decline of the population. We are travelling to the cemetery when we greatly needed a strong, virile race. We were never in a worse state to produce-one. The manhood of the nation ha.s been lost or crippled ••in the war. Many, women have ruined their prospects of motherhood owing to the national vv;ork they have undertaken. 1 fear that the women who have been driving motor-cars will not now care to push perambulators through the slums of London." An Ashburton farmer who read the paragraph in the "Guardian" of yesterday relative to the German pencils in use at the booths on polling clay related his experiences to a reporter as | follow : —"1 thought the blanky thing must have been a German. It had a 1 shiny point, and 1 scratched, and I scratched away at the bottom line until ! those in the booth no doubt thought I had a lease of the screen. Then it suddenly dawned upon me that the pencil might be .a prohibitionist, and I felt ihalf tempted to try my luck on the top line. I realised that this might be risky, as one vote might decide the issue, so I did the next best thing and took the ballot paper to one of the poll clerks and asked him whether it, would do. He told me it was a secret ballot, and he did not want to see the paper, so I dumped it into the box, trusting to luck that those wTio oounjted the votes would know that 1 voted for wet canteens. Next time 1 will take my own pencil. No more of I your John Fabei: for me."

The tedhnn of life in a military hospital was relieved lately when a patient in one of the wards "pinched" a pal's glass eye, which had been placed on the table beside his bed, states the "Australasian." When tTie owner missed it he explained that he had seen the cat swallowing something tlrat looked like a glass eye: The idea was, ridiculed, but a solution of the doubt -was offered in the ready suggestion that they should have the cat X-rayed. As the man who started the joke held both the eve and the bag in which the cat was contained there was no difficulty in placing the eye in the right position for corroboration. The print was convincing enough for anything, and the man, who still held the bag with the chloroformed cat 'coming round, ssgain, suddenly gave a weird choking sound, and exclaimed, "Blessed if he hasn't coughed it up." There' is still much wonder over the strange affair, though the case is not likely to be mentioned in the medical press.

Consideration of the erection of municipal dwellings is regarded as dangerous ground by the Mayor of Wanganui. In discussing a local proposal, he pointed out that many reforms initiated for the benefit of the workers' had failed to achieve the desired object, and he feared that this would be another of the same sort. Ho would give his reasons. The rate of wages lixed by the Arbitration Court depended largely on the cost of living. If that decreased, the employer had the right to that wages should be decreased too. In the event of the borough building houses and letting them at a loss, what would be the result? The employer would have the right to come to the Court and point out that rents had become lower, and it cost the worker less to live, and that accordingly wages should come down. If such considerations prevailed, the borough "subsidy" (which meant a drain on the rates) would not benefit the worker but the employer. That was a danger to be'guarded against.

The instruments at the Domaam ; weather station last night recorded isuiV degrees of frost. ... ; It is understood that the Agricultural^ Bepartment- will not be able to. stage; its 'large Winter Show exhibit at the- | Ashburton Winter Show in June, but, i that there is a probability of the De-. ! partment sending along a. few exhibits ■ that will bo of interest to farmers. The following Ashburton County, men. will return by the Tainui:—Second- | Lieutenant P. S. Crisp,. Ashburton; .A... I Clark. Thnvald; E. F. Clark, Ashburton; R. S. H. Day, Ashburton;; J. J.-Dwyer, Ashburton; D; Fitzgerald,. Ashburton.; Corporal L. C. Hunt,,, lAllenton; F. G<. Sunnier, Winslow. The Hastings Borough. Council has\ received 38 replies' from local bodies with regard to the Mayor! s resolution, in favour of Sir Andrew Russell being; GrovernoivGeneraLof- the Dominion. Three local bodies endorsed, the proposal, four made, formal acknow- , lecfement of the resolution,, and 31! marked it received. When commenting on the extraordinary high price of- J building,timber in. face "of. the fact that there has been, practically little demand for it. in New I Zealand, during the past few. years, a locaL builder informed a "Guardian" reporter that. Australia was at presenttaking., every spare foot of timber; that could, be milled;in.the Dominion,.hencethe high price.

Anomalies in regard to voting.at-the 1 • recent poll, are- still, being.; related.. The- | latest is that of an Ashburton lady who, j apparently had her doubts , about., the secrecy of the ballot, and having, applied the German pencil to the ballot paper, she carefully folded., it up in.. brown paper and placed it in.the box.. How she expected the clerks to know how she voted without first removing, the brown paper, is best known to herself. The milk supply, which has recently, agitated a section of the Borough residents, has now settled down.to normal. The vendors who came to the rescue opened a depot in Burnett Street today, and, if sufficient support is forthcoming, this wiii be continued with a: girl in charge, so that milk wlTl be on. sale throughout the day. The vendorshave not been able to decide whetherthe depot is likely to, be a paying proposition, as they find that the quantitybought at the cart daily has fluctuated, considerably. . The late Lord M.k-hoiham, who is believed to have hud the finest collection of jewels in' the world, including the ■famous Russian stones, was once askecl.. by a would-be-connoisseur if a certain, specimen were not of considerable value. Not wishing to hurt the feelings of his inquirer.. Lord Michelham proceeded to tell him the story of the young man who showed the late Lord Rothschild a ring containing (it was alleged) .^a rather precious stone. "Yes," said the great financier, "it isquite good. I have a whole mantelpiece of the same .stuff in the next room." Mr Samuel Turner, the well-known Alpinist, has returned to Dunedin afteran exploring trip to Milford Sound. He climbed tho Tutako Mountain, and got within a short distance of the summit. • He explored'the Tutako Valley," and; : liopes to make, a new pass next, year to cross the saddle down to Lake Wakatipu, which ho considers will bo the best route for tourists returning to Queenstown after visiting Milford. He will recommend the - Tourist ■ Department to cut a track and erect a small mountain hut at the forks of the two valleys at the head of Tutako Valley,— Press Association.

"I opposed it, but now I am heartily in accord with the Saturday half-holi-day," remarked a business man at a recent meeting of the Wanganui Council of the Chamber of Commerce (states the Herald). The matter cropped upv through a request from the Palmerston North Saturday Half-holiday Committee, asking for the opinion of the Chamber, on the subject. "Many of the bitterest opponents to the proposal are now very favourable to the Saturday half-holiday, and would now oppose any change back to the mid-week holiday,'" said Mr R. W. Green. "There were none of the dire calamities which it was-stated would eventuate upon the inauguration of the week-end halfholiday." "Marton has not becomeany busier on account of it," remarked another member. It was decided to reply that the members present were; satisfied with the Saturday half-holi-day.

A gang of men is at present engaged' filling in and levelling the vacant strip of land along the southern side of thetown end of the the, railway platform. When completed this work will improve greatly the appearance of that, part of the station. It is understoodthis strip of. land will be titilised later for a- dock to accommodate the Mt. Somers and Timaru trains. An improvement in this respect is needed, asm addition to being more convenient for the passengers, it would leavemore room in the:; yards for shunting, operations, the carriages for the trainsreferred to having, at the present, time, to stand for the whole of the day on one of the loop lines in the middle of the yard.

Miss McKee, secretary, Ashbiuton Red Cross Society, has received tliefollowing letter from M> J. Cairns, chairman of the County Council:— Madam: This Council passed unanimously the following resolution showing its appreciation of the unselfish work undertaken by the various County branches, ."That "this Council places on its minutes its . heartfelt thanks to the various . Red Cross branches in this County for their untiring and effective work during the late war and feels proud to .record that the call of the wounded anff sick met with such a magnificent response." It would be esteemed a favour by the Council if you could see your way to remit this, resolution to these branches.

The Pride of Wakanui Lodge, 1.0.J&.T., held its fortnightly meeting in the Wakanui schoolroom last evening. .Bro. W. Butterick presided over; a fair attendance of members. Business relating to the Grand Lodge Session, to be held in Christchurch at Easter, was discussed. Final arrangements were made in regard to the picnic to be held;' The remainder of the evening was devoted to an entertainment. *" Songs were given by Sister A. j. Amos and recitations by Bro. McLean and G. W. Andrews.

The most successful whaling ground iust now" is the South Atlantic; in the' neighbourhood of South Georgia,. South; Shefclands. and the Orkneys.. '

At the Lvttelton Police Court to-day five members of the crew of the steamer Hororata pleaded guilty to the theft of sis cases of jam valued at £15. Each, defendant was fined £10, in default two months' imprisonment.—Press Association^. Tho first relief Christe'lrareh-Dunedin exnress in connection with the Easter sholidavs reached Ashburton about 1.35 P.m. to-day. Tho train, which will run to-morrow and on the 22nd, was not Very liberally patronised ko far at least as the journey from Christchurch to Ashburton was concerned. The second express for the south this afternoon carried a number of soldiers who returned by the Wilioehra, including: several cot cases. It is understood that there were two men for tho Ashburton County but, as i* frequently the case, the Defence Department neglected to advise the local office that they were due to arrive. Mr D. Moore, secretary of the Ashburton Patriotic Committee, was on. the railway platform this afternoon on the look-out for any Ashburton men returning by the Willochra. Seeing: a soldier walking along the platform with the aid of crutches, Mr Moore apTjro'aehed him and asked him whether ■his destination was Ashburton. His renlv was: "God heavens, digger, have a heart !" It is an odd thing, which can be explained only by delving deeply into history, that though a man is related to the peerage of the United Kindpm as a Baron, thereafter he is never addressed, except in intensely official documents, by that title. In fact, the only barons we know in this country are foreigners, and in the British school of melodrama the Baron is usually bold and bad. Another eccentricity makes the English peeress of that rank in her own right a Baroness and not a Lady, as she would be if she- were the wife of a Baron.

SotiiiT time ago the Ashburton Returned Soldiers' Association suggested that on the afternoon of Anzac Day some procession of a fancy nature should be arranged in order to induce' the public to contribute funds towards the expenses of their association. After mature consideration the soldiers decided to preserve the sanctity of the :dav and hold an ordinary procession, and leave it to tho generosity, of the public to contribute at a ceremony in j the Domain. The same regard, however, is apparently not to be observed by a number of young men in the town, who have issued invitations for a ball in the Orange Hall on Anzac Night. At the meeting of the Otago Presbyterian Synod to-day the resignation' of the Rev. Dr. Watt, Professor of Hebrew and Church History, was accepted, taking effect in February, 1920. It was resolved that provision be made for the appointment of an additional professor, and that the salary of Dr. ■"Watt's successor be £600 yearly," with £100 yearly for house. , The Moderator said that this was an important forward movement. The Rev. Mr Cameron said he thought the appointment of a fourth .professor was necessary -to fiover the tuition of students. It was .stated the college reserve fund at the end of 1918 stood in credit £1109. The Ecclesiastical Fund had a credit of £5225. —Press Association. The Bishop of Chelmsford (Dr. Watts Ditchfield), at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, recently told the story of ■' a-brave Bethnal Green woman who had lost her son. He was in a British submarine which saved a liner by intercepting an enemy torpedo. The British submarine was destroyed, all on board perishing. The mother of the ; sailor, on being interviewed, said: "Was it not a good thing that the tor- , pedo struck the submarine?" "But . your boy was in the submarine," said the interviewer. "Yes," replied the mother, "but if it had struck the liner there >■ Would have been a thousand women like me."

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9588, 16 April 1919

Word Count
3,854

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9588, 16 April 1919

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