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POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE.

'Q.__W'hat is our first duty ; t6 Ne& Zealand to-morrow? : .

A.—To vote for Continuance. It is the only way. of preserving our t libr erty. ■■ / : ' ; ' :,

Q.—What will happen if we omit tb' record our vote? :

A.—The Prohibitionists will rule the country- .

"I am absolutely opposed to the principle of compensation."—L. M. Isitt, in Parliament, Sept. 18, 1917.

Read this again: "ABSOLUTELY opposed to the PRINCIPLE."

So Mr Isitt will,, of course, -strike, out the bottom line; tomorrow. '

"Only a Girl" writes:—At a Lodge; meeting i was made to promise to; strike out the top line, but I-don't want to,' after all I" have read in the. Papers. Yet I must not break a promise. What-can I;do. ..

(You can keep your promise if you carefully turn your ballot paper upside down.)

Another letter from. "Anti-Gloom." He writes-.—"Please, tell your' readers again that this Prohibition Law would mean no. sacrifice at all for the rich "Efficiency Leaguers," etc. 1 read a lot of their names this morning.

"I am not rich enough to fill up my cellars with wines, spirits, etc., should prohibition be carried to-morrow. They , never seem to think of what they are depriving the working man. AH they talk about is getting more 'efficiency' ( out of the working men and women."

i He adds:—"My wife says that we both work quite hard enough as it is, without having our little comforts taken away and the cost of every tiling increased, just for an experiment io please the Prohibitionists: "She hopes that every woman- wilt strike out the bottom . line tomorrow."'. :.;..;■ ' ■■-• •-.•'.•■

It is for the people to say. whether they will ACCEPT l THESE BUB,^ ©ENS (Prohibition and . Compensation).—Sir Joseph, AVard, Minister of Finance. . ■'".■.■:.' >. .. V v.'t -\

From the life of Burton, the famous^ Explorer and Scholar, translator of "The Arabian Nights" :— "In all bad clin.ates—West Africa, India, and elsewhere—when" an epidemic such as Cholera or Yellow Fever comes on, tb© first men to die are the water-drinkers. /"When the first virulenqe has polished them off, it carries off the heavy drinkers and the only persons left liv,-- , ing arc the moderate drinkers. This is a positive fact and anybody who* gainsays it has had no practical ex-perienr-e in very bad climates." —P. 6, Vol. 2, Life of Burton.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190409.2.15.1

Bibliographic details

POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9582, 9 April 1919

Word Count
381

POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9582, 9 April 1919

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