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POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE.

One of the questions of the day is:. What was the value of alcohol during the influenza epidemic?

We have already published prescriptions from Christchurch doctors. With regard to the country districts, Dr. H. D. Davenport, whosename is well-known throughout, Canterbury,, writing from Hororata, an-tswej-s * this question. Here is -whatlie says in answer to ail inquiry OBthe subject•:— , vv "I prescribed s Alcohol . IN ALL CASES of Infilleiiza during the recent •-' Epidemic, and LIVES WEBE SAVED BY ITS . USE."

But if prohibition should be carried, everybody would be deprived of" alcohol without a doctor's '-certificate.. In the cities, of, crurse, the chief disadvantages, would be expense and> delay. But in the country districtsthe circumlocution and .the time required to obtain supplies would- he' aggravated.

In many cases the patient .would: die before* the re.nedy arrived. • . ••

Prohibition consequently endangerslife, in town and country, but especially in the covin try.

Ie is important that you record your vote next Thursday. Do not leave this DUTY, until late in the,,, day. Make sure- in the morning, if 'possible, that you have done your part for the preservation of your liberty. ' - .<■ i Remember, >the extremists will. vote*, -whether you do or not;?'

I i Moderate Elector.—My. mother takesa glass of stout every evening, and we think it does her good. Do you mot realise what a hardship you seek , to inflict upon scores of thousands of i elderly people:* I j Prohibitionist: Your mother- must i think of others and never mind her I own tastes and comforts. Besides,. | sshe would do far better, on tea. .

Moderate: But. the stout, JU tell you,, gives her benefit, and she now -is 74' years of age. '

Prohibitionist: Ah, but. had) shebeen a teetotaller all her life she would be 94 years old by now.

Should prohibition • be carried, it will be a punishable offence to make' wine or beer in your own home. The penalites are very heavy.

. If you'are even . suspected of committing this new crime the police may sseai-ch and overhaul your premisesat any moment. Your only consolation will be that ,- this is prohibition—and prohibition"' at. ■" a cost of £4,500,000 compensation. Mr Justice Herdman (speaking, as Attorney-General):—• "1 deny the right of the No-license party in this community to place the whole of the people of the Dominion in a strait-waistcoat. We have a right to do what we like, so long as we conduct ourselves as respectable- • citizens.

"We have a right ; to form our : own: private habits; and ,1 consider it a piece of impertinence on the.part of the No-license people to. claim that they should have the right and- the privilege of suggesting' to me or • "toother members of the : community who love liberty, that our habits, should conform to conditions which they arbitrarily lay down."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190408.2.16.1

Bibliographic details

POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9581, 8 April 1919

Word Count
469

POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9581, 8 April 1919

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