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APRIL THE TENTH

POINTS FOR THE PEOPLE.

Q.__ls Dr. O'Brien, Christcliurch, ia favour of Prohibition? 'A.—-Yes; here is one of Ins prescriptions during the Epidemic.

Barlow's Buildings, Christchurch, Nov. 28, 1918.

Messrs and Co., (a Christchurc'i Firm of Brewers).

Dear Sirs, —

Mr ■, St. Albans, requires some stout after his recent influenza, I recommend that you supply him with

.some.

Yours sincerely, (Signed) A. 8./O'BRIEN

A Q.—And Dr. Whetter, Christchurch, wants to make the country "drier"?

A.—Yes; here is one of his prescriptions:—

Please supply Mrs . ——, Chester Street, with one dozen stout for medicinal purposes. •:■'.. (Signed) JOHN P. WHETTER. , xxv.—xi—18.

q;—Under Prohibition what would Doctors charge for a prescription containing Brandy, etc.?

A.—ss to 7s 6d, or perhaps more. They would make large fortunes.

Q.—Then the Doctors , should he in^ favour of Prohibition ?

A..—Well, it would pay them, certainly.

Q\ —But, surely under Prohibition, Ale and Stout would be unprocurable as soon as present stocks run out?

A.—Yes, that is the ca.se unless the Government started a brewery, which 1 the Prohibitionists would not allow.

"A MotQier" writes:—"lt was very chilly on Saturday afternoon, but the Ohristchureh Temperance Demonstration and. procession of little children in white muslin was conducted with_ that strict precision and perfect obedience which, is always a feature when the Prohibitionists are in charge. The arrangements were very complete, and nothing was omitted, except refreshments for the children."

.(But, of course, the Prohibitionists don't believe in refreshments.. /Thais what their, campaign is against.)

•■Anti-Gloom" writes again:—"lf we carry Continuance. on Tlrursday will the Prohibs. 'iet us cheer up a little and remember once, more that the Allies have won the war?"

(After next Thursday the Prohibitionists will have all the ; gloom and our correspondent will be more cheerful.) •

Q. —Can America really spare Professor Nichoils, of Boston, Foreign Field Secretary, llnterhational Reform Bureau, and Mrs Rhodes, President of the Women's Commonwealth. Club, member of. Legislative Council, Washington, and so on and so forth? Is it fan* to. Uncle Sam that New Zealand should deprive the great Republic of their guidance and philosophy? ,

A.—Yes, we had thought ofS this danger to the U.S.A. Indeed, w*e, vsaw by Saturday's cables that during the absence of the Professor and the others—not forgetting John Roberts— Chicago fell off "the water waggon.

What was that?

A.—A cable message on Saturday recorded that Chicago had repudiated Prohibition by a quarter of a million majority.

Reminds one of Ashburton and Masterton and Brace and Mataura and Wellington South and Wellington Suburbs.

THE MORAL.

To preserve your personal liberty —make no mistake about it—and on Thursday next,

VOTE POR LIBERTY.

4 166

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190407.2.15

Bibliographic details

APRIL THE TENTH, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9580, 7 April 1919

Word Count
436

APRIL THE TENTH Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9580, 7 April 1919

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