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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

On account of the low price ruling for sotck, the price of meat in Carterton has been reduced all round.

The Reparoa block of 130,000 acres in the Waiotapu Valley, 25 miles from Rotorua, which the Government had just purchased from Messrs Stead and Watt for soldier settlement, was bought from those gentlemen at an average price of just under £2 per acre.

An old couple living at Himatangi, and who for years past have derived the best part of their living from beekeeping, had their swarms and hives destroyed by a departmental officer owing to the non-compliance with the regulations governing bee-farming (reports the " New Zealand Times").

At Maungaturoto Court a local butcher was fined £5 by the Magistrate for feeding pigs on uncooked horseflesh. It- was elicited-that defendant had bought up horses for the purpose. Defendant said he had been feeding only his breeding sows in the fashion stated, but had discontinued the practice tor three months.

The need for a motor ambulance in Ashburton was discussed at the meeting of the local branch of the Canterbury Automobile Association on Saturday night. It was intima,ted that in the event of the Hospital Board deciding to purchase a motor ambulance, at least two local owners of garages would undertake to store and keep it in repair, each for a period of 12 months, free of charge.

The remark is often heard on the occasion of a big crowd assembling tha. " Napier grows more like London every day" (says the " Hawke's Bay Herald"). This was exemplified in Tennyson Street recently when many of the ladies attending a dance " sat out in motor-cars drawn up in the roadway and quite openly indulged in the soothing cigarette, much to the surprise of conservative passers-by.

The Ashburton Hospital Board is to be called upon to defend a claim of £16 from Mrs F. M. Parker, who had charge of the temporary hospital at Methven during the epidemic. It is understood that a counter-claim will be lodged for alleged destruction of material. Evidence will be heard in the case at Ashburton on April' 14. The board discussed the matter in committee at the meeting to-day.

,0n account of the water flow in the channels being so low, the Borough Council employees are testing the working of the fire hydrants daily. At present the water in the north branch of the Ashburton River percolates through the shingle before it reaches the race which supplies the Domain rionds and the channels. It is not pected that this water supply will "improve without rain, although .-_the melting of the snow from the hills made a temporary improvement.

The matter of fast * driving on the part of some motorists in the principal streets of the Borough .wis commented uoon at Saturday night's meeting of the Ashburton branch of the Canterbury Automobile Association. Members strongly condemned the practice, especially at busy periods of the day and at lunch hour, when there were so many children about. It was subsequently resolved to bring the matter ■under t_e notice of the Borourii Council, requesting that the by-laws with regard to the motor speed limit and reckless driving be rigidly enforced.

An amusing sidelight on early parliamentary history in New Zealand was given by Mr L. M. Isitt, in the course of an address at Dunedin, recently. "The first Parliament in New Zealand," said Mr Isitt, "sat for 10 or 12 weeks, and did not pass a single Act except one. That one was to legitimise the sale of liquor to members of the Upper and Lower Houses! Then it wound up with a free fight on the floor of the House with sticks and umbrellas going." Loud laughter was roused by this sally, and was increased when a membor of the audience expressed the opinion that present Parliaments were not, much better. Mr Isitt refrained from expressing concurrence with this statement.

An unusual claim was made^ by a Wellington dentist last week for the value of services (£3 ss) against the husband of a patient: The plaintiff said he had made three attempts to fit the patient with dentures, but owing to the fact that she was very deaf he could not secure the necessary co-opera-tion, and as he was not satisfied with the result he suggested that the teeth should be handed back and no charge should be made. However, the teeth were not returned. The defendant's wife stated that the plaintiff had arranged a series of signals whereby the difficulty in regard to her deafness would be overcome, but this statement was denied by the plaintiff. The defendant said the plaintiff had told him that if the teeth were returned no charge would be made, but in that case his wife would have been without teeth for a considerable time; The Magisirate ordered the return of the teeth.

With the ending the war, and the consequent cancelling of further orders for the manufacture of khaki, it would naturally be assumed that the New Zealand woollen mills would be able to cope easily with the demands fo^ cloths for men's suitings. The opposite stats of affairs, however, exists. The .woollen mills of the Dominion are being rushed with orders, arid' cannot meet the demand (says the "Otago Daily Times.") One reason given to a member of our staff who made inquiries into the shortage was that owing to the absence of supplies from Britain stocks of New Zealand manufactured cloths were completely depleted; and, further, that orders for Home cloths are now being daily cancelled in view of the fact that they are at a very high cost, and that the Dominion manufactured clothes, quality for quality, can be. purchased much cheaper. The prospects of purchasing tailor-made suite at a lower value in New Zealand do not, however, appear very promising. FoV instance, the quotation of one Dunedin tailor for a navy blue suit is 11 guineas, the bid th itself costing over £6. Under the circumstances there is a steadily growing tendency to gb in for suite cut by a tailor, but made up in a factory, 'chiefly by girl labour.

All the. Canterbury riversi are reported to be clear to-day.

The Rimut'aka has sailed from London for New Zealand with 800 troops.

George "Sidney Connor, • a married man. was ioiocked down by a train at the King Street level crossing at_ Newmarket on Friday evening, and died on -Saturday. -

Health Department records before the Hospital Board to-day showed that there were 103 cases of influenza in the Dominion during the last three weeKs in March.—Mr F. W. Watt stated that if the epidemic broke out again in this district the local organisation could be called out in five hours to fight it.

The Hon. A. M. Myers, ActingMinister of Finance, states that subscriptions in anticipation of the., forthcoming war loan are being received. He states also that the compulsory provisions of the Finance Act, 1918, will be put into operation.

Up to the present none of the forged bank-notes which are reported to be m circulation in Christchurch have appeared in Ashburton. The date on the notes cashed in Christchurch have been altered to' January 1, 1916, and the numbers, which were from 600,000 odd, have been changed to 300,000 figures. The alterations have been made m ink.

A London cablegram reports the Press Bureau states' that the Army Council: Admiralty and Air Council are issuing certificates to all members ot the personnel belonging to the Home, India. Colonial, Dominion, and Egyptian forces mentioned in dispatches, and to members of the British Red Cross. Young Men's Christian Association, .and other recognised organisations similarly mentioned.

At the Hospital Board meeting tcdav Mr W. J. Dickie, M.P., said he honed if it became necessary "to send any consumptive returned soldiers away from Ashburton that they would _ not be sent to Palmerston South, Otaki, or, Cambridge, 'but that some arrangements would be made to locate them at Christchurch, so that relatives would not be obliged to travel long distances to visit them. He knew of one instance where the Minister of Defence had eiven instructions for _ a soldier to be admitted at Christchurch. and he hoped that the Minister would be made use of in the future if necessity arose.

Marshal Foch has acquired an English habit. The French do not smoKe pipes. Day by day Marshal Foch saw Field-Marshal Haig and other British generals in the vortex of • the war calmly doing their work behind good big-bowler briar pipes. Foch asked Haig what it was like to smoke a pine. He bought an English one. He filled it under careful military instruction. He began the attempt with energy and purposeful determination," but at first smoked more matches than tobacco. Now, however, he. has mastered it, and thoroughly enjoys a- good -briar which he has bought'from an English firm.

Mr John Thompson, sen., a resident of Killinchv of many years' standing, and a man who was helcTin high regard in the district, was the victim of a fatal accident at Dunsandel on Thursday evening. Mr Thompson attended Mr J. S. Boag's clearing sale, and when driving home with his son. Mr John Thompson, jun., in a spring-cart or trap, the horse shied just as it was cominc out of Mr Boag's gateway, and the wheel ' struck the gate, or gate post, cavising the chain holding tho swingle-tree ■to break. The horse then, bolted, and Mr Thompson and his son were both thrown out on to the road, Mr Thompson, sen., being killed almost instantaneously.

A statement of the receipts nnd. expenditure in connection with the Ashburton Racing Club's autumn meeting presented at a recent meeting of the committee showed a Balance on . the debit side, due principally to the heavy taxes levied on account of the war, and which will not be recurring. The amount paid out by the club in taxes For the current year 1918-19 for the two meetings was £2225 Os Bd, made un as follows:—Amusement tax £30 10s lOd. dividend tax £1010 9s 6d. gate receipts and totalisator tax £1184 0s 4d. It has been decided to apply for the following dates for next season's racing:—Thursday and Friday, September 18 and 19 1919, and Thursday and Friday, March 18 and 19, 1920. In the event of the latter, dates not beinp- a.vnilable. it was decided to apply for May 6 and 7.

At the Hospital Board meeting today Mr W. J. Dickie, M.P., stated that he _ad noticed correspondence in the . papers regarding Tuarangi Old Men's Home, and in fact, he had received letters of complaint himself. He had a letter in his pocket, but did not care to read it. He thought they should advise the Christchurch Hospital Board regarding the complaints. If everything was in order at the Home it was not right that these charges should be made against the administra-. tion. —Mr Hugo Friedlander stated that the arrangements in regard to the control of the Home were fixed by Parliament, and this board had no say in the matter. —Mr Dickie said lis would pass the letter he had received on to the Minister. —Mr; Friedlander said the Ashburton Board had a right to send a certain number of inmates to the Home, but beyond that had no control.—The chairman stated that on several occasions the board had tried to get some control, seeing that it had to contribute to the upkeep of the institution.

At the meeting to-day the Hospital Board had a large number of departmental circulars before it, issued at various periods, in regard to relief for sufferers through the epidemic.—The chairman said these circulars were very contradictory, and indicated that the Departments were on a fishing expedition^ in regard to this reliefv—The clerk stated that seven applications _ad been received for relief locally.—One 'circular suggested 'the setting up of a Social Welfare Committee* to review all allowances quarterly and report to the Government, the board having power to do so under Section 64 of the Act. The committee would be required to review circumstances of the applicants for relief, and, if satisfied, would recommend the amounts to be paid by the Government.—The board decided to oppose the Social Welfare Committee, which would be introducing outsiders into the matter, the members feeling that they were quite capable of dealing with, the applications for assistance. A committee, with power to act, was, appointed to draw up reasons opposing the Welfare Committee. —The board approved of applications before it.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190407.2.14

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9580, 7 April 1919

Word Count
2,090

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9580, 7 April 1919

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