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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

On a charge of disturbing a prohibition . meeting addressed .at Nelson recently by Father Cronin and, Mr Todd, George William Ruff and Newton' Frost have each, been fined £5 and costs (7s). ■■■«■■ ''. : -

The Minister of Defence has received the report from the Commission set up to deal with the question of the release of those objectors to military service who had refused to bear arms on religious grounds. Sir James Allen said that there were still some questions in connection'with the report to be considered by Cabinet, and until they had been dealt with he could not say what the effect of the report had been.

The following sales of local interest were made at the Addington stock yards yesterday:—Fat ewes: For J. Stewart..(Lyndhurst), 60 at 30s 2d to 335; C. Goodwin (Lauriston), 19 at 25s lOd to 30s 2d; C. Sargent (Rakaia), 35 at 26s Id to 28s 7d; D. Johnston ('Lyndhurst), 32 at 23s 3d to 27s 3d; J. Travers (Rakaia), 40 at 18s 9d to 24s 9d. Fat lambs: For C. Goodwin (Lauriston). 40 at 26s Sd to 275; D. Johnston (Lyndhurst), 44 at 25s 6d to 26s 4d; C. Sargent (Rakaia), 95 at 22s 9d to 25s lOd.

Searched at, Victoria Docks, London, Walter .James Hollo way, 26, labourer, was found to have a slab of frozen salmon in each leg of his trousers.

It was reported in Christchurch yesterday that an amalgamation has been arranged of the firms of Pyne and Co. and Gould, Beaumont and Co., Christchtirch. and Guinness and Le Cren, South Canterbury.

At a meeting of tlie Levels County Council.' held yesterday, a discussion took place on a resolution from the Ashburton County Council suggesting that military training should be abolished. The Levels Council decided not to endorse the Ashburton resolution.

A change took place in the weather .yesterday, the temperature being very low. Towards evening rain commenced but it was. light and of but brief duration. The instruments at the Domain weather station at 9 o'clock this morning recorded only 1 point for thel preceding 24 hours." Light, drizzling rain fell at internals to-day.

Those who fire officially interested in the solution ofs the housing problem receive -continual proofs of its acuteness in Wellington. A gentleman related to a " Dominion " representative the complaint of a young wife of a New Zealand soldier. She came from England, where, she said, she had lived comfortably along with the other members of a fairly large family in a house for which a rent of 6s 6d per. week; was charged; On arrival in Wellington she had to pay £1 Is per week for one room —a; room so. small that in going from one end to the other she had to step over a box full of clothing.

Wellington lawyers—and their/clients —are complaining about the Jong delays that are taking place in getting titles through the Land Transfer Office in Wellington.' " It. was not so bad," said one lawyer,. " before the war, though mriny would not accuse the office of being in haste, but the delays that are now taking place are too serious, and in some cases are. hindering business concerning the transfer of titles. We are now getting out titles that we put into the office in August or September last; and 1 ft'bin.our experience it seems hopeless to expect to get a trans-' fer through in less than six months."

Rrrognising the valuable work done by kindergarten associations in ; New Zealand in seeing to tho mental and moral welfare of children bolow school a^e. the Government has adopted the recommendation of the Hon. J.VA. Hanan. Minister of Education, tof subsidise these schools pound for pound for. buildings and the acquisition of land. Evidently > the Minister of Education looks forward to the time when the State will undertake fuller responsibility for this work, which is so valuable in large cities, as the subsidy is to be subject to the stipulation that when the Government is prepared to take over the kindergartens ; their property which has been subsidised will become vested in the Education Department.

Our Methven correspondent writes: In future the shons in our township will close on Saturday afternoon instead of Wednesdays, and Friday night will be the late night. This will bring practically all business people into line, as already all the offices of commercial firms and professional offices close on Saturday. There is no doubt that the change will be beneficial to the shopkeepers and their assistant in most rer spects, and it remains toue seen only whether it will prejudicially affect their businesses financially. The public, appears, on the whole, to be taking kindly to the coming change, although there are a few protesting loudly; probably these latter will be found to be persons who would have the shops open morning, noon, and'night for their own particular convenience without, any regard for the convenience or wellbeing of the business people. However, time will show whether the innov-ation willbe lasting. - ;

The ignorance of some parents as to the proper way to treat their children from a health point of view was touched upon by Mr C. T. Aschman in his address to the North Canterbury branch of the New Zealand Educational Institute recently. The total unsuitability of some of the lunches given to the children to take to school was one point mentioned by Mr Aschman, and another was the lack in some cases of proper and sufficient clothing. As most important of all, Mr Aschman made special reference to, the absolute necessity for sufficient sleep for the growing child. "I consider it absolutely criminal," he said, amidst applause, "when I see a child of - about two years or so being wheeled through' the streets at half-past 10 or so at night, its little head on one side, quite overcome by weariness owing to the'sleep it has lost because its mother must go to the pictures." The effects of the lack of the proper amount of natural sleep, Mr Aschman added, were not noticeable in five minutes. They took, some considezlable time to manifest themselves, and therein lay the danger.

A very interesting point came before the Native Land Court sitting at Masterton on Thursday (says an exchange). Areta Mahupuku, well known in the Wairarapa, died during the epidemic, and left a will devising all her property to an adopted son, Wi Tamaha.u Mahupuku. It appears that the adopted son is a European, who was taken by. Areta while he was Quite a baby, and that Areta in 1905 applied for a Judge's certificate, which was granted, ami she registered the child's adoption in the Native Land Court. As the law stands now ,1 Maori cannot adopt a European child, either in the Native Land Court or the Magistrate's Court. The will was not objected to, but it was submitted that the European could not take the native, land of deceased. This depended on whether, the adoption was valid, or not. After hearing argument. Judge Jones decided that a Maoi-i could not, according to Maori custom, adopt a Euronean child, and there being no valid adoption the bequest of the native lands must fail. There was no question as to European lands or personality. The total value of the estate is about £10.000, of which £6000 represents the native lands. Messrs Thompson, Moran. and. Robinson represented the respective parties interested.

All the Canterbury rivers are reported to be "clear to-day.

The Mayor of Timaru received word yesterday from the Minister of Public Works that he had authorised the expenditure of £800 for surveying the route of the transmission line from Lake Coleridge to Timaru.

Portuguese navigators, in the year 1500, taking advantage of the northeast trade wind to get into the South Atlantic and there pick up the strong westerly wind of the " roaring forties" to reach the Cape of Good/Hope, found Brazil.

One of the most'striking old maps in pxiatence dates from the sixth century. It deoicts the heavens held up by.pillsrs placed upon undiscovered parts of the earth, and'shows the Creator and the aneols busily attending the stars.

The late Czar of Russia was by .far the most wealthy of sovereigns, and the only one who' kept all Crown property in his own hands. His income, approached £80.000,000 a.year, and his landed property covered a million sauare miles.

Torday over 100 members of the Red Cross and xhe Lady .Liverpool Society were entertained at luncheon in a marquee in the Domain Oval. On occount of pressure on space our report, of the proceedings will not appear ' until tomorrow's issue.

The report of the officers appointed to consider the basisi of payment in the. ■different branches of the public service has been adopted by- Cabinet. It is understood that school teachers are also concerned. The re-classification .will probably -involve an increase in salary in all branches of the service.— Press Association. ■ -' :

When the original programme of peace celebrations was announced it was stated that the Government would provide souvenir [ medals for all New Zealand^ children on the lines of the South African medals. Oixifurther consideration Cabinet has decided to abandon this"expenditure on thesground thjit the money, can be spent on a mere urgent and useful object;

The milk depots at the water tower and the Technical School were again liberally patronised this morning. The vendor stated to a "Guardian" reporter to-day that he had served about 300 customers, including 180 at the water "tower. During the past two days shopkeepers have been doing an unprecedented business in billies, due perhaps to the establishment of the milk depots. ;

"Isav, to hell with the reporters," declared Dr. Thacker at last night's meeting-of the executive of the Port of Ghristchurch League, when the members wefe proposing to discuss the nominating of candidates to' contest the municipal elections, but were looking askance at the pressmen present. Dr. Thacker went on to repeat the aged fiction that the reporters went back to their offices with correct reports, but that the sub-editors and editors bluepencilled and altered such to meet their own views.

A farmer near' Levin was much puzzled by recurrent outbreaks of a violent skin irritation among the members of his household. The trouble has now been traced to a climbing plant that he was carefully cultivating, under the delusion that it was a Virginia- creeper. The plant has now been identified as the Californian poison vine (Rhus toxicadendron). Contact M'ith the leaves produces a form of irritation sometimes like eczema and sometimes like erysipelas.

It has been decided by the Justice Department to abandon the trial of Hare Piwari. Peter Piwari, and Pitau Panirau, charged with the manslaughter, in June. 1918, of Ria Horoiriona Rehe, who died as the.result of injuries said to have been inflicted by the accused while practising tohungaism. The Department's action was dictated largely by the fact that the principal accused, Katie Piwari, died during the epidemic last November. The accused were committed for trial at the August, 1918, sittings of the Supreme Court a? T/hristchurch, but the case had to be held over from time to time on account of the difficulty of conveying the prisoners to New Zealand, consequent' on the loss of the Himitangi.

During the Niagara's voyage to Auckland from Sydney there were several cases of siclmess one or 1 two of them being serious. Yesterday afternoon the vessel proceeded to quarantine, where the invalids will he landed. She has a large ,number of passengers for Auckland, and there is a heavy booking for the outward voyage. A Press Association message received this afternoon from Auckland states that fifteen cases of influenza have been landed from the Niagara at Motuihi, and also several contacts. The cases include three saloon and sis second class passengers, and six of the crew. Three cases are rather serious, but none is dangerous. There are five hundred passengers on the Niagara. Ordinary quarantine is sixty hours after the last case has developed.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190403.2.14

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9576, 3 April 1919

Word Count
1,997

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9576, 3 April 1919

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