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PEACE CONFERENCE. POST-WAR TRADE.

RESTRICTIONS ON GERMANS

(Received April 2, 11.4.5 a.m.)

PARIS, April 1. In the discussions on enemy trade, wo policies have been, advocated before he Supreme Economic Council.

The policy favouring post-arniistipc restriction on Germany's imports has been argued along lines declaring that the Allied countries should not suffer from the shortage of food or raw materials, nor pay inflated prices through German competition for the limited supply, which would also prevent manufacture in the devastated districts where the factories were deliberately destoyed, whereby Germany might profit. Further, the restrictions would save the Allied countries from unfair competition, by the fact that Germany could sell cheaper in either case, as she can now import raw materials at a lower price than the Allies paid for such materials under war conditions, or because of her depreciated currency. Another argument in favour of restrictions was that these would cripple Germany's future strength, and thus satisfy natural public feeling in the Allied countries that Germany should be made to suffer heavily for the war.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190402.2.21.5

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9575, 2 April 1919

Word Count
174

PEACE CONFERENCE. POST-WAR TRADE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9575, 2 April 1919

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