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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

The New Zealand Dairy Association, Auckland, has distributed among its suppliers the sum of £105,933 0s 4d. This covers 1,397,802J1b of butter-fat, supplied during February.

"1 think in our experience in this Court we have never had a Chinaman who has not answered his bail," remarked Mr H. ¥. O'Leary at the Wellington Magistrate's Court. "Yes, they are pretty good that way," agreed Mr F. V. FrazeiVj S.M.

Mr Hardeastle, organist of theJPortadown Parish Church (England), complained at a meeting of the urban council that he was unable to sleep because of a neighbour who sang hymns late at night and sometimes at 2 and 6in the morning. The council advised the organist to apply for an.mii unction.

' 'The , speech which was delivered by Mr Davis, the United States Ambassador;* i: at the Pilgrims' Club ■lunch, stamps him as an orator of the-finest traditional type, and brings him into line with Loweli, Bayard, and Choate, who were all orators of the first rank." says the "'Daily Express." "Once more the United States representative stands out as an upholder of the tradition that all their diplomatists are consummate orators." .<• ' .

The ■ Invercargill Town Council has decided to investigate a super animation scheme for its employees - from Ist April under the National Provident Fund. It is expected (says a correspondent of the ''Otago Daily Times") that thfe first year of the scheme will cost the council £863, but of this £608 will be chargeable against the general fund. Fif by-one, employees have decided to join the fund, and the others will be given six months to make up their miridp.

The vexed question of liability for reconstruction of bridges on main arterial roads is again being discussed in Mastertou. Air Free, S.M., is sitting as a Commission to allocate among local bodies the cost of the Tauherenikau traffic bridge which was erected by the Featherston. County. The latter county agreed to pay, two-thirds of the cost of the structure and made claims upon local bodies, extending as far as Eketahuna, for the balance. The whole of these bodies, with the exception of Gireytown and F«athersto» counties, have objected to the allocation made by the controlling authority, hence the necessity for the Commission, which will make the allocation aftei- taking evidence.

At the meeting of *the executive of the JProvincial farmers' Union, at Palnierston,- a reply was, received from the Minister of' Lands to a request that the farmers should be placed on an advisory board in connection with the purchase of land for returned sbldiers. The Minister of Lands wrote that it would be impossible, to accede Co the request. Some members pointed out that the advice given by leading farmers to the Land Purchase Board had been disregarded and' none of the places suggested had been secured. The Board had turned down suitable land at a fair price, and had purchased land totally unsuitable at a much higher price. One member gave an instance where a suitable property had been offered and rejected. It was afterwards purchased by a speculator who eventually sold it to the Government at a higher price. :

Referring to the question of preference to unionists and the application of the principle to public servants, which has been raised again by the Nelson section of the Public Service Association, the Public Service I Journal for March says: "It seems almost beyond belief that in the midst of the industrial-; person in the Service who is either content to be carried on the ishoulders of turmoil that exists and in view of future possibilities there should be any others or desirous to commit economic suicide, . We believe the association has some difficut tasks to perform, but it will be a pity if it is to Tbe hampered in its activities by the apathy or hostility of any of those persons whose interests it is striving to preserve and advance. Preference to unionists is what is wanted in the Service, and we trust that when amendments of the Public Service Act are being discussed this particular reform wilfbe urged, upon the Government with all the force that justice, reasonableness, and right will command."

'From Serbian official sources a. story comes of torture inflicted by Bulgarians on a Serbian lady, the wife of a Serbian officer, against whom they had vowed vengeance for -opposing Bulgarian propaganda. As they could not reach the officer himself, they arrested his wife and five children. The wife was compelled to go on foot under escort from Pristina to Veles, where she was condemned to death by court-martial. Next day she was kept in sight of a gibbet, but after a period of profound mental agony was removed to prison and told that she would not be hanged for twenty-four hours. On the following day she was again taken to ' the execution ground, and for twelve hours faced the gallows, awaiting her execution. Once more she was sent back to her cell, but in the meantime was flogged until she became unconscious. Then she was imprisoned at Nish, and again was led out for execution, this time to be shot. She was lined \ip with a number of Serbian priests and schoolmasters, who were shot before her eyes, but when it came to her turn she was told that she would be sent to Sofia. Here she was thrown into a cellar, and her legs placed in irons. In this condition she was kept for four months without a change of clothes. Next she was sent to a prisoners' camp, and, being destitute, she was forced to beg. She was finally released after, the armistice.

All the Canterbury rivers are reported to be clear to-day.

The s.s. Willochra, which is bringing 1068 returning soldiers, is due at Wellington on April 15.

Another section of the " ocean _wave" •in East Street is now undergoing an overhaul, picks being utilised instead of oil to soothe the troubled waves.

In usually well-informed London circles it is conjectured that Peace Celebration Week will be from June 23 to .Tuue 30.

Much interest is-being,taken in the municipal elections in Masterton. The Labour Party is making a determined effort to capture the balance of power in the council.

Reports of substantial grain yields in the County are still coming to hand. Mr. Wills, Greenstreet, yesterday threshed a crop of Sensation wheat which yielded 60 bushels per acre.

William Laffey, aged 46.years, who was arrested in Tancred Street last night, appeared before Mr J. B. Christian, J.P., »at the Magistrate's Court this morning, on a charge ■of drunkenness. He was fined 20s, in default ,48 hours' imprisonment.

Two young ' Rarotongan "" soldiers arrived at Wellington in custody on Thursday from Rarotonga in _ connection with the recent rioting, 'said' to be a protest against-the overcharging by traders while the troops were, away from home.

Tt is said that in some places in the North Island the spirit merchants and ha-ewers are taking numerous orders' from persons" who- think it as well to lav in a stock for use if prohibition is carried. Inquiries in'-Dunedin (says the Dunedin "Star") show that there is no rush here, nor any perturbation ill the market,; -prices being 'quite steady. ,

-The-Overseas Committee has allotted Duucdin space for 21,000 boxes of butter and 21,000 crates of cheese in the Athenie, and Invercargill 7000 crates of cheese. The shipment of tht> Invercargill cheese is to bo made at Port Chalmers or Wellington, as may be arranged with the agents of the Athenic. Lyttelton has been allotted 7000 boxes of butter and 2100 crates of cheese by the Athenic. , A large cjuantitv of butter is being held back by the manufacturers to' meet the demand of the local market during the coming winter.

The secretary (Mr J. F. Stone) reports that all arrangements aro. complete for the eighth annual "A. and P. Show at Methven to-morrow. Special train arrangements have been mode to suit, visitors from Rakaia district and intermediate stations. The show gives promise, of plenty in the wav of attractions, and some very intere«tins: contests are anticipated in the 'hunting events, where well-known riders and prominent hunters will be competing. The Eighth (South Canterbury) Band will also be in attendance.

The entry of fat sheep at the A.«hbtirton yards yesterday totalled 1931. comprising 1052 lambs, 829. ewes, and 50 wethers. The yarding of stores, the bulk of which consisted of ewes, aggregated 3452. On account of the shortage of grass feed, due to the long spell of dry-weather, the demand was very limited, for all classes of store sheep, the majority of the pens being passed in. One line of aged rape ewes was passed at 2s 6d, and another line of full and failing-mouth ewes in poor condition at 4s. *■

A "Guardian" representative interviewed several of the leading auctioneers with reference to Mr Joe Taylor's suggestion that passes should be issued at all clearing sales in the County. It was admitted that there was a good deal of petty thieving at these sales in reeard to small or odd lots, but not of a very serious nature. One auctioneer said it was- a sort of epidemic. Two years ago sheep used to disappear on the railway between Methven and, Addington; now it was grain. Generally, the opinion was that the issue "of nasses would not be effective, as people attending a clearing sale had generally half-a-dozen exits to choose from, and nroner pnnervision was not practicable. It wn<? different with a furniture sale in a town, where there was only one entrance or exit.

Some time ago a' series of charges, were brought by the Yen. Archdeacon Gossett against' the Rev. C. E. Perry (vicar of St. Michael's, _ Christchurch) alleging practices not iir conformity with the teaching and regulations of the Prayer Book. The charges were 'heard by Bishop Julius, whose judgment was. on the whole, favourable to the vicar of St. Michael's.- v'The Yen. •Archdeacon Gossett appealed against this judgment, and the Court of Bishops sat in the Diocesan offices in February to hear the appeal. The Court _of Bishops has decided to. give its' decision about the end of this month, when the General Synod will meet at Napier. •The court will seize the opportunity of the gathering at Napier to have a final conference before announcing its decision.

An unexpected finale attended, the Tarata, doc trial on Friday. The programme concluded with a. heading and holding competition for ladies. Seven ladies had worked their dogs, with loss success in some cases than in others, and it was thought that the work-of the judge was finished. However, another competitor wearing a white dust coat and drooping hat, and followed by a dog. emerged" from the shade of some trees, and it was made known that Mrs Jones would try her skill. Mrs Jones displayed considerable ability in dog and sheep work, and had her sheep, nicely placed in the ring when a strange dog butted in. The strange dog was followed by another lady, and Mrs Jones was so annoyed at the interruption that a fight ensued. While the two female figuresi were grappling with each other and kicking .heels and skirts in the air. fEeirliats came off. The close-cropped heads and honest countenances of two male residents of the district were then revealed.

I've an antique, brass-bound cabinet Built in my bedroom wall, Wherein I keep—locked*' -up, yoxi bet— My treasures great and small— My tobacco-jjaVs and best cigars, And gilt-edged literature: Likewise my cash and Trades Hall sash, And Woods' Great Peppermint Cure.

4t Hastings, on Saturday, 303£ acresof land, part of the late Hon. J. D. Or-; mond's KarAmu estate, were submitted; for sale by auctioii, arid flispbsed of attf. the average price |of £77 per acre., „,

A Press. Association message from* Westport, received to-day, stated that; dlagging for the body, of William James Hiekey, who was drowned; in. the Buller,, on Sunday, had so far been unsuccessful. • s . 5 „,

The Irish vital statistics , for ,1917' show that the birth rate, 19.9 per 1000,' was the lowest recorded., The number of births was 86,370, among which thera were 10,001 twin, births , and ten triplets. . ■/■'.» ".:'.' -.••■■ ,g ■ . .-,:..

During the week-ending at nooiiyesterday, live cases of influenza: were reported, throughout the, Wellington Public Health District. One case was severe, and four were mild cases. They, were located, two at Wellington, two at ,Wanganui, and one at Waiapu.

. "You 'stand' for a position in New Zealand. In America we 'run' for it !"-' said Mrs E.M. Rhodes during her address at the Canterbury Women's Club' last night. "There is a difference, if you notice it!" (Laughter.)

The Minister of Customs stated yesterday that the Customs duty collected in March amounted to £345,553, aritT the excise beer duty to £26,514. The C'ustopis duty, for the ..<. financial' year ■'• ended.March;3lst was £3,83.1,048 j! and * excise, beer "duty £273,451,' a total of £4,104,499, which is the largest amount ■' ever collected sin one financial year. .

"We have a peculiarly-named, but' very effective- law in ■ Washington,"' stated Mrs E. M. Rhodes in her address at the Canterbury Women's Clublast night. "It is called the 'Lazy Husband Ac,t, J and a man who is arrested under that Act is< shamed to death if there, is any shame left I'm him. lv. Seattle' a mail' who will'not work toprovide for his family is sent to "the^ stockade, where he is compelled to> work, his wage of six. shillings a day being sent to his family. This has the* effect of bringing the lazy-man to hi& senses in a very short time!"

A large number of local residents availed themselves of the new arrangement in the milk supply this morning, to obtain their customary quantity of the lacteal fluid. In the majority of instances the children 1 were sent to thestands at the water tower and Technical School, but some well-known business men were also, noticed heading, homeward juggling with bicycles and. jugs of milk. The milk vendor .was well satisfied with the demand and returning, home had the unusual experience of .carting home a pocket full of cash ia addition to empty cans

* There have been numerous cases whore soldiers have sold their farms arid other properties in order to go into camp, and having returned from the war, or been rejected after spending some time in camp, have desired to repurchase their properties or acquire, others to take the place' of the ones sold. Stamp duty at the rate of £1 per £]00 of purchase money is payableon all transfers, and in the cases mentioned th»i duty has, or course, to be paid twice, that is. on the first sale, and on the subsequent repurchase, in addition to legal expenses. Mr AY. H. Field, M.P., lias been endeavouring to secuie the remission of the duty oil repurchases by soldiers so situated, but Cabinet has intimated to him that no action can be taken to amend the law as reouested.

The return of infectious -diseases reported in the Canterbury-West Coast Health District for March, 1919, totalled 116, as compared with 97 in February, an mcrua.se of 49. The details for March, with the February figures in parenthesis, are as follows: • Westland: Diphtheria 3 (1); no enteric (2), or' scarlet fe ?r (1). Buller: No cases reported ; in February, 2 cases diphtheria, and 1 of scarlet fever. Grey: Diphtheria 5 (0); enteric 1 (0). North Canterbury: Diphtheria 13 (9), enteric 1 (2), scarlet fever W (16), tuberculosis 34 (22), measles 5 (1), septicaemia 1 (1), erysipelas 3 (0), ophthalmia neonatorium 2 (0), influenza, 20 (8). Aslibxirton: Diphtheria 1 (0), scarlet'fever 2 (3), tuberculosis 3 (0), erysipelas .1.. (0), influenza, 0 (1), measles 0 (1), hydatids 0 (1), septicaemia 0 (1). South Canterbury: Diphtheria 19 (12), scarlet fever. 7 (3), tuberculosis 2 (2), pueapereal septicaemia 1 (0), hydatids 1 (0), influenza 3 (7). , Recently «, paragraph was published in the " Guardian " indicating that the Land Boards would not entertain applications for grants for land from soldiers who were fit A and in New Zealand camps at the time of the armistice except the said soldiers could furnish a discharge. The circulation of this information led' to a number of applications being sent' in to the Department from soldiers who were anxious to take un land, and who were getting. tired of waiting and losing valuable time and money. At the recent conference hold at "Wellington of chairmen of Repatriation Boards, it • was decided—" That in the case of men who havce not been overseas the certificate of leave, in lieu of discharge, is,to be deemed to be a discharge for the purposes of the Repatriation Act.'' It has also been arranged that the Defence authorities will now issue a discharge on application. The Repatriation Department, however, does not now intend to insist on this . legal technicality. •

The Returned Soldiers' Association, is growing as nieu return from active service, and already the Dunedin Association has some 1500 members. The"Otago Daily Times" reports that committees have been formed in most of the towns throughout Otago, and are moving towards the formation of local associations. The function of a new association in a country^town means that members of ' tho Dunedin • Association who live in that town have to be' transferred to the new association, but the loss of members in this way is more than made up for by fresh enrolments of newly returned men. The whole' question of these small associations will be considered at the .annual general conference, which is to b.e held in May,. probably in Christchurch, when the suggestion will be made that the small associations should be under the direc- . tion of a central provincial headquarters. This would obviate the .overlapping and duplication of effort which is liable to arise through the existence of many local associations, and would tend, to promote solidarity among the returned soldiers in New Zealand as a Avhole.

Lord Rothermere has offered Cam-. *ridee University £20,000 to found a Verft Harmsworth. Professorship o£ naval history.

" Haunted house wanted, "to rent or purchase, freehold., with 5 to 10.acres.

of land, within 50' miles, of London." So ran "an advertisement whioh appeared recently in a London newspaper.

Joseph French, Charged with obtaining money by false, pretences from a widow, appeared on remand at . the Dunedin Police Court to-day. He reserved, his defence, atfd was committed for trial.—Press Association. ;

Last week reference was made in the " Guardian" to the dilatory methods of the Defence Department in not payiner soldiers for overcoats' handed in, during November. The notice evidently had the desired effect of waking the Department \\p with a jolt, and at least one local soldier thankfully received his cheque yesterday afternoon, which he duly cashed.

The Minister of Defence has received cable advice from the Air Ministry, London, that two British fighting machines and two " D.H.4 T. machines with equipment, also two riggers and two fitters, are proceeding to New Zealand shortly. The machines and equipment will remain the property of the British Government, and New Zealand will be held responsible for their custody. It is understood that the .machines were presented by the Royal Air Force. "The rotten character of the Hun," said Mr F. W. Haybittle, at the Wellington Bowling Club recently, "was shown in a little incident that occurred at Bapaume. ,Three weeks after, our troops took Bapaume, the Mayor and a few priests went to the little cathedral —not a big one—to hold a service of thanksgiving. They were in the middle of the servicfl when a time-fuse bomb went off. The Mayor and all the ■.rest of the party were blown to atoms, and the church fell in. j There was simply nothing but. a." ( heap of ruins when I saw the place.'.'.r . <i

A'liSrrow escape from drowning, occurred at the Ashburton river in the vicinity of tho traffic bridge on Sunday, when a little boy, Ronald Calvin, aged six years, a son of Mr E. H. Colvin, Burnett Street, was rescued by Ivy Bright, the eleven-year-old., daughter..of Mr R. Bright, Ashburton. The little boy, with other children, was playing at the edge of the water when he fell in. The incident was^noticed by the girl Bright, who happened to be in the vicinity with friends." She immediately went to the assistance of the boy who was being carried downstream, and succeeded in bringing him safely ashore.. The boy received, a severe fright, but, is now none the worse for his experience.

After the harvest adjournment the Pride of Wakanui Lodge held ,the opening meeting of the.'session! in the schoolroom last evening.^ There was a fair attendance. Bro. W. Butterick, L.D., presided. A hearty vote of rthanks was passed to Mr J. Cochrane, ■of Elgin, for the' use of his grounds for the annual picnic, whioli was.r held on .New Year's Day, the success of that .outing being in a large measure due to the kindness of Mr and Mrs Cochrane. Representatives were appointed to the "Grand Lodge session to be opened in Cliristchurch on April 22. The officers were re-elected for a further term. It was decided to hold a picnic at the Wakanui.Beach at Easter, '

■"' Commenting: on a letter whi'cli ap--neared in the " Guardian" yesterday with regard to. missing sacks after the cram was loaded on to trucks, a. local agent remarked to a "Guardian" reporter to-day that this was not an uncommon complaint. He instanced one case last season in which 3000 hags of wheat were consigned from Methren to Timaru. On reaching its destination the consignment was. 27 bags short. In another case in which 1200 ba^s were trucked at a siding south of Ashburton for the same port, on reachin"- its., destination it was found \ the 'consignment was 10 bags short. .', In one of these instances full inquiries were made, but there was no evidence that would give any indication as to how the sacks of grain disappeared.

Mr Henry Brett, principal proprietor of the Auckland " Star.'/ has tendered his resignation as a director of the "United Press Association. He was one of the journalists present at a' meeting in Timaru at the end^of 1879, when representatives of the 'Press Association of that period and of the New Zealand Press Agency met for the purpose of amalgamating the two organisations under the title of the "United Press

Association, and he was then elected adirector of the association —a position which he has lield continuously for

nearly 40 years, until the present time. v The retirement of Mr Brett leaves Mr * George Fen wick (of the " Otago Daily, Times") the sole survivor on the United Press Association of those who were present at the meeting which "brought.the association intb existence.

The late Mr H. Wells, formerly organist of the . Christchurch Cathedral and St Stephen's Church, Ashburton, was a chorister at Worcester Cathedral, find a letter has heen received by Mr Clarence Turner, now of Wellington, from Mr Ivor Atkins,- the present oreranist of "Worcester Cathedral, as follows: —"I was very interested to hear from your letter of the excellent work done at Christchurch by Mr Henry Wells, and of his love for Worcester Cathedral. I hope and think that all our choristers take away happy memories of th.gr life here, and especially ot the musftr of the Cathedral. I have only been associated with the Cathedral since 1897, but Miss Done and Mrs Limoltan—both daughters of Dr. Done —may remember Mr Wells as a boy, and I will show your letter to them, for they take a Keen interest in all that relates to the old choristers." The Dr. Done referred to in this letter was organist from 1844 to 1895, during part of which time Mr Wells was chorister.

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9575, 2 April 1919

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3,954

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9575, 2 April 1919

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