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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

Mr Philip Gibbs, the famous war correspondent, has joined the staff of the "Daily Chronicle," on a long engagement. He fulfils a lecturing tour in the United States previous to taking up his new position.

At the last meeting of the Teachers' Sunerannuation Board in Wellington a matter which caused some surprise was the announcement that a further sum of £894 had been transferred to the unclaimed contributions account, representing the contributions of persons whose membership of the fund had lapsed and who had not applied for a refund of their contributions. The total amount of unclaimed contributions is now £1200.

It was stated in a sheep-worrying case at Feilding that during the summer months, when herding fat sheep, a local drover received in payment from £30 to £32 per month. Examined regarding the values of. dogs, an expert witness declared that a real good heading dog was worth £20, and a good forcer (a : quiet worker behind the shee) from' £12 to £15. A South Island visitor had offered £20 for a Feilding dog, was another statement by a witness.

" National Education " states: — "When the war commenced in 1914 the roll of the male teachers of New Zealand, from University .professors down to pupil teachers and probationers, a.nd including Native school teachers and inspectors, contained less than 2200 names. _ From that staff, with its additions'in the interim, the enlistments up to December 31, 1917, over a year ago, numbered 902, exclusive of those rejected on medical grounds. These teachers have received 'wounds too numerous tb detail, honours not a few, and not lesss than 150 of them have, as they would have said. 'cone West.'"

* '■■'■■ All the Canterbury rivers are reported to be clear to-day.

The instruments at the Domain weather station on Saturday night recorded three degrees of frost.

Officials at the Pahiatua Post Office and the Bank of New Zealand are chuckling over a cheque which they handled a few days ago, (says the "Herald"). It was in settlement of income tax demands, and was made payable to "Bill, Joe, and, Co."

According to cable advices received at San Francisco,; Japanese and American capitalists have established a steamship company with a capital of 50.000,000 dollars." One line will be established between Calcutta and South American ports, a second between New York and Vladivostock, via the Panama Canal, and a third between Yokohama and Liverpool, via Suez.

The old Borough School buildings are being rapidly demolished, and there will shortly be nothing but two oak trees left on the site of the Borough's first primary school. The oaks on the Tancred Street frontage were planted by the children on June 22, 1897, in commemoration of Queen Victoria's record reign, and it is understood that the new owners of the site will take care to have the trees preserved.

The wrecked "Hyderabad, a few miles above the outlet of the Hokio stream (near the Manawatu river)' continues to brave the forces of the deep in spite of the number of years she has lain there. Her port side, exposed to the full fury of the sea/ is showing evidences of the continual buffeting from the heavy seas -that strike that portion of the coast, but the starboard side seems almost intactv The mainmast with its' yardarm is still in position. The vessel went ashore over 35 years ago.

The Asliburton ■ Post Office is still working short-handed in the telephone exchange, due to the enforced absence of two of the lady operators since the influenza epidemic. The Postmaster (Mr Harle) said to-day that although a great many post' office employees were retxirning from the war, the telephone department had not been greatly relieved." There was a tendency for Civil Servants to leave their old positions to co on the land.

" A great deal of noise has been made in some quarters about our Soldiers bringing wives out from England with them." said Dr.> Thacker, M.P., at the annual meeting of the Canterbury Rugby League on Saturday night. The speaker regarded this as very wrong; in fact, criminal. He said that every one of these wives was- worth three or four thousand pounds to the country, which would also be further enriched if.every one of our girls, who did such fine patriotic work; were to co to America or England and bring home a husband. ■

"St. Dunstan's Review" has the following story, which it states was told by General Townshend., It concerns an English Tommy, and Indian sowar, a"hd a German prisoner whom the latter was guarding. \For lack of something better to do during the closing weary days of the siege of Kut these three made a bet as to which would stay • the ilongest in a native goat house on the outskirts of the town.. The Tommy was the first to enter, but came out in half an hour and was violently sick. The Indian went in next, but he had to seek the open air in forty minutes. The German. went in last, and after five minutes—the goat came out.

The monthly meeting of the Ashburton Farmers' Union was held in the A .and P. Rooms on Saturday, Mr J, Brown presiding over a small attendance. The correspondence consisted of a letter from a London firm asking that careful consideration be given to the recommendations of the Australasian section of the British Incorporated Society of meat importers for the meat trade after the war, and this was held over for discussion at the next meeting. Subsequently .a lecture was given by Mr J. Keii 1, Christchurch on "Motor traction for farm work." The lecture was listened to with interest, and at the conclusion the speaker was accorded a hearty vote of thanks.

The passing of Mr P. Drummond's " Clearwell " Estate; into other hands on Saturday is not without^ special interest to ''returned soldiers in this County. Recently the owner, knowing the value of the land for cutting up and its suitability _ for returned men, offered it to the Government at a price lower than he received for it subseauently at auction. In addition, he offered to accept a low deposit by way of Government war bonds. He also offered to accept a low deposit by way the soldiers, to provide 10 stacks of oatsheaf chaff. The reply he received from the Lands Department was "that the matter would be kept steadily in view." The property was purchased by farmers in the district, who evidently knew its value, and the only returned soldier who obtained a look in was Mr J. Davidson, of Lismore.

The general impression that America is a place where most people can get rich is not exactly correct, but the fact that at the end of 1916 there were 22,----696 millionaires in the country suggests possibilities. There are 10 persons in the U.S.A. with a yearly income of over 5,000,000d0l each, nine with an increase of between four and five million dollars, 14 possessing three and four millions yearly, and 34 from two to three millions yearly. However, 'all is not gold that glitters, as the saying goes. Alas, a large amount of it is swallowed up in Income Tax! Mr. Henry Frick, John Rockefeller, aud Andrew Carnegie each pay huge sums towards the upkeep of the war. Rockefeller parts with the sum of £7,000,000, a sum which only leaves him £5,000,----000 to sustain body and soul for the rest of the year; Frick, with £2,000,000 yearly, pays. £1,500,000; and" Carnegie, from his beggarly annuity of £1,500,----000, must needs pay £1,000,000.

The Government; Meteorologist's forecast to-day, was as follows:—The indications are for northerly winds, moderate to strong prevailing, freshening and backing by west, to north. There is a prospect of fair to cloudy weather. The barometer has a falling tendency.

The " Colonist" states that recently, when parcels of literature were delivered from the Post Office, to the organiser of the Nelson Prohibition League, it was found that a large portion of it was soaked with whisky.

The management of His Majesty's Theatre advise that seats pan now be bonked at The Bristol for the Triangle feature, "I Want My Children," to be screened on Tuesday and "Wednesday next.

A Press Association message from Stratford: states that Harry H. Rawlinson; sawmiller, of Whanga,momona, charged with employing his brother, James V. Rawinson, who had deserted from the Expeditionary Force, was fined £50 by Mr A. Crooke, S.M.

The Marton Borough Council has the most unique distinction for public bodies of"'having a substantial credit-at the bank, owing to its do-nothing policy (says the "Advocate").—The late Mr Seddon used to say that the; local body which had > a heavy bank balance was sure to be a bad administrator.

Twelve of the more valuable monkeys at the Taronga Park Zoo, Sydney, were inoculated -'against'" influenza recently, because monkeys are near enough to human beings to contract their diseases;. The outbreak of the disease,:/in'*.South' Africa played havoc with] the /wild baboons, and the Trust decided to take no risks. ~

George Henry Anderson, a returned soldier, who was drunk and creating a disturbance-in East Street yesterday afternoon,•■: was arrested by; Constable Excell, but' not before the former had put up a fight for liberty: and had damaged' the constable's, helmet. Andcrsoiii appeared at the Court thiv morning,,; .'before Messrs' H.) A. Lloyd nnd> W. W. White, J.'sP..,.to answer charges of drunkenness and j, disorderly conduct, using obscene .language, assault on the constable, ,arid 'damage to his helmet. Accused was firi^d 40* for the obscene language and 20s for assault, and was ordered to pay 12s 6d for damage to the helmet. A conviction was entered on the other charges. Payment- of the fines was forthcoming.

The sun shines over Dunedin for one hour and two minutes longer on Do-r-ember 31 than it does in Auckland. TVio reverse is tho case on June 30, wßen it shines 57 minutes longer" in Auckland. On December 31 Wellington has 26 minutes more' sunshine than Auckland and 24 minute? less on June 30. This variation in the sunshine is one of the reasons why the^ South Tsland is better" adapted for grain-grow-ing;. Although Dunedin has less sun in winter, there are many more fine days -and a clearer sky than in the North, while the opposite conditions prevail during the summer months. . .

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19190331.2.13

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9573, 31 March 1919

Word Count
1,719

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIX, Issue 9573, 31 March 1919

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