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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

A Manchester man believes that he has the tables, arm-chair, hddle-back chair, and various other articles ot rurnituro which were in use in Alloway cottage when Burns was born; and a York man claims to have Jean Armour's table.

The surface of the road at tho entrance to some of the water races on the Ashburton-Methven Road, more particularly where the road dips into, the race, "is soft and loose, and some rough shingle laid clown would -prevent greater damage. j

It is somewhat unusual for.:a prisoner to congratulate or extend thanks to a constable for arresting him. Hut this happened on Saturday morning in Timaru (says the "Herald"). 'After a prisoner for drunkenness was sentenced he said to the magistrate that he wished to congi'atulato- tho- constable on arresting him, as he had a big sum 1 of money in his ■ possession at the time, and there were a few " hangers on " about. He would have lost his money ho said if he had not been arrested.

Among tho Canterbury beneficiaries under Mrs S. A. Rhodes's will are: —

To her nephew, 'W. Cranstoun Wigley, solicitor, Christchurch. £2000; £1000 each to her nephews, William Sefton Moqrhouse and Benjamin Moorhouse, Christchurch; her niece, Rosa, wife of Arthur Rhodes, Christchurch; her nephew, John Studholme', of Coldstream, Canterbury; her nephew, Joseph Studholme, of Ruamii, and Walter McAlpine, of Mount White Station, Canterbury.

Newspapers in other countries continue to give forth weird information concerning New Zealand. The latest, from tho Birmingham " Weekly Post," is as follows: —'"There is scarcely any crime in New Zealand, largely because they make strenuous effort there to arrest, try, convict, hang and bury a criminal within two weeks of the commission of his crime, if this be murder, or, if not a hanging offence, to get him as quickly as possible into a disagreeable prison, where ho will have to work hard and fare upon bread and water."

At the Patea County Council meeting, a claim, through a firm of solicitors, was made for £36 16s by a settler who alleged that he had met with a mishap through the County Council having left a quantity of material by the roadside. The qhairman urged contesting the claim on a matter of principle, as they frequently had to leave metal on the roadside. It was decided to instruct the county solicitor to defend the action.

At the Magistrate's Court to-day, counsel for a plaintiff apologised to the Bench for his client appearing without his coat. Tho solicitor stated that the plaintiff had been busy at work, and had not had time to change his attire. Mr Day, S.M., who was presiding on the Bench, stated that it had ever been a tradition of British Courts that a witness was allowed to appear in his working attire. ■He presumed that a sweep could appear in his working clothes if he wished,, though that might not be very pleasant for those in Court.

' At a meeting of the Ohakune Borough Council last week, Or. A; H. Wilkie (who was suspended for a week at the previous meeting for disobeying the ruling of the chair) put in an appearance, and as he refused to accede to the Mayor's request for an apology, Constable Annison was sent for. As the constable was out' of town at the time, the meeting was adjourned till the following evening. Cr. Wilkie again appeared, and refused to tender an apology, with the result that he was forcibly removed from the Council by the police, in addition to being suspended for 14 days by the Council.

"Nelson and Tnvercargill are the best laid out towns I have seen in New Zealand," said Dr. Mill, past president of the Royal Meteorological Society, in the course "of an interview. "If Wellington had be,en laid out originally in expectation of tho,present population, it could have been made the most striking town in the world. The terraces should have been made to follow the hills instead of switchbacks like the socalled terraces that are there. But considering the history of the place it is marvellous how tho facilities of the town- have been adapted to the needs of a great modern commercial city. Inveroargill is a flat town,' but in Nelson the rectangular system' has been adapted to hilly ground with perfect success, and in a most remarkable way."

The executive of tho Auckland Exhibition has decided to extend tho season till April 18. After March 28, however, it will be opened at 2 p.m. each day, except Saturdays and holidays, when it will be opened as at present, at 10 a.m. The executive decided some little time ago that the Exhibition should be closed on March 28, but since then there has been ■almost an av.ilancho of- requests that , Easter should be included. The. North Auckland District Court in the Exhibition lias bopn awarded the first prize of £100. given for tho best provincial court. There aro only two in tho Exhibition, reprpsonintiv'e of North Auckland and ol' Southland, and there has nqver boon any doubt in the public mind as to which . would secure the award. The Southland Court has been very severely handicapped. Planned on a large and expensive scale, it has not realised the hopes of those who, designed it-., for much of the material was do-, layed mv.v.y weeks by the strike, until it was impossible to complete it and make it fully representative.

At the annual meeting of tho TaranakiDistrict Manchester Unity 1.0.0. F., neld at Eltham yesterday, a resolution in favour of consolidation of the sick runds of the Hew Zealand branch was carried by a substantial majority.

By the premature explosion of a dynamite cap at Ross yesterday, Robert Parker, a miner, had part of the thumb and forefinger of his left hand blown off, also receiving a nasty gash just above the eyebrows:

The signs of tho times indicate the approaching general election. . Various political organisations are on the move, and members, .are beginning to, address their constituents. A large number of newcomers has arrived in the Ashburton district, and those persons who think they havo any claim to a, vote should see that their names are on tho electoral roll as soon as possible.

A number of erstwhile scholars of the Ashburton High School, at present studying at' Canterbury College,' returned to the College, by this afternoon's express. Their' numbers were swelled by two more pupils ' of tho Ashburton High School who aro about to enter Canterbury College, viz., Miss Doris McClurg, and Mr E. C. Withell. The teachers and a' large number of the pupils assembled at the station to see the students off.

A Dargaville, Press Association message states" that' a serious outbreak of typhoid has .occurred. Three men were brought' to ( tlic local hospital on AVednosday,. suffer ing from tho dreaded epidemic. One of tlib sufferers (Schniska) died yesterday morning, and another is not expected-to recover. The cases are from the bush. Rain is badly needed throughout the district. Feed is short, and the milk supply to the factories is decreasing rapidly.""" Stock is suffering badly.

A movement is on foot in the Bay of Plenty district to establish either a freezing works or a meat-canning factory. From information received at the Auckland > branch of the Farmers' Union it appears that a feeling prevails in the Bay of Plenty that a meat-can-ning factory should be established on a moderate scale in the meantime, as it is considered that the time as hardly ripe for the establishment of freezing works.

No warnings, however frequent, appear to have any effect upon local cyclists who are in the habit of ...cycling on tho footpaths and at night without lights. To-day a batch of these offenders appeared at the Magistrate's Court, and in every case a fine was imposed. Sergeant Emerson told the presiding Magistrate that the police had been requested by the Mayor to endeavour to put down the practices of riding at night without lights and- on the footpaths, so those who offend in either way should beware.

Some time ago (says a Press Association telegram from Nelson) the Audit Department, refused -to admit claims for travelling expenses of two members of the Nelson Education Board totalling £57 16s 6d. The matter has been the subject of correspondonce between the Board and the Audi-tor-General,'and the members who held office when • the charges were incurred havo now been informed by the latter that 1 they have been jointly and severally surcharged with the amount. The matter will be discifssecl at next meeting of the Board.

.The* employees of the firm of Messrs Andrew Orr aiid, Company held their, annual picnic yesterday, 'the chosen spot for this year's outing being Peel Forest, to which resort excursionists to the number of 30 journeyed in motor cars. Perfect weather prevailed, and the day, was thoroughly enjoyable. Se\rcral of tho party essayed an attempt to climb the mount, whilst others contented themselves with exploring the bush a little way. up the sides./ The male members had a delightful time bathing in some of the mountain pools.

During the course of a deputation of unemployed to the Mayor of Auckland on Friday l^st an interesting light on tho attitude of prospective workers towards country employment was cast by one of tlie deputation when the Mayor spoke of the Waiuku railway work being pushed ahead. "It is no good to a married man to keep two homes going." said the worker. "We want work in town." In answer to the Mayor's suggestion that it would bo beneficial to a worker's wifo and children to have a spell in the country, the protesting one objected that the expense of shifting was an insuperable difficulty.

The Meat Trust in Australia is adopting the methods that mak.e money. It has secured the services of two of the smartest men connected with one of the biggest meat concerns in Queensland. One is reported to be receiving £3000 per annum, as against £1000 which his Australian employers paid him, and the other £1500 in place of some £700 or £800. Tlie "Bulletin" argues that "this country doesn't ..yet generally understand th<> value of big pay, but the Yankees will teach the lesson. Unfortunately i^ will be at'the expense later on of Australian stockowners and stock consumers, unless the Trust is going to belie all previous history."

An accident with' an: amusing side happened in Kltivclock Street yesterday afternoon. , Two men were • driving along tho street in the direction of the East Belt, when something went wrong with the harness, and tho shafts of the vehicle cocked skywards. For a brief period the air in the immediate vicinity was filled with cabbages, fowls, sheets of galvanised iron, men, and numorous other articles with which the call had been well loaded. While the shafts were in the air the horse severed the connecting straps, and when pulled up, though still attached by the traces, instead of being in the orthodox position between the shafts, it had turned round, and was gazing somewhat disconsolately into the cart, in true comic paper fashion. The occupants of tho- vehicle escaped without a scratch, and no damage worthy of mention was done.

The manure from sheep" has a higher fertilising value than, that derived from any other animal. Next in strength come the exorementitious substance from pigs and horses. Cattle manure is less concentrated, but as regards quantity produced cattle come first, then horses, while pigs and sheep naturally produce less per animal. The fertilising value of a manure, however, does not altogether depend on the animal producing it, as the character of the, food consumed influences in a great measure the quality of the manure, and even the manure from the same animal may vary daily in quantity and quality. . :

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140313.2.15

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8817, 13 March 1914

Word Count
1,974

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8817, 13 March 1914

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