Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

BRITAIN'S ARMY.

COLONEL SEELY'S STATEMENT.

ABLE TO COPE WITH ANY

EMERGENCE

IPer Press Association—-Copyright)

LONDON, March 11

Colonel Se,ely, in introducing the Army Estimates, said that, although there was a shortage of 8000 regulars, there was a surplus of 13,000 reservists. The speeding-up of mobilisation had been remarkably successful. An expeditionary force of 162,000 was complete in all details, and 50,000 of all arms would be ready in a few •hours to go anywhere.-'1 Though the Territorials, were 56,000 short, the year's recruiting had been the biggest on record, and there was a continuous substantial increase in efficiency.

He did not say that such an 'army was able to meet every Imperial call. For this they would want; the help of the Dominions overseas, but their army was able to cope with a bolt from the blue. The national. reserve now was over 217,000. V \

If Britain went to war to-morrow she would want 102,000 horses. There were 275,000 available. It was not true that foreigners were depleting the British supply. , Tests for accuracy showed that the American rifle was first and the British second, but the British; rifle was superior in all-round reliability.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140312.2.39

Bibliographic details

BRITAIN'S ARMY., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8816, 12 March 1914

Word Count
194

BRITAIN'S ARMY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8816, 12 March 1914

Working