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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

An important land sale (a Christchurch Press Association message states) was held yesterday, at which tho Balvazie Estate, Rakaia, was sold. Altogether 2434 acres were sold at an averago price of £26 10s per aero. It is understood to be the biggest sale of land over £20 per acre ever held in the Dominion.

" Those who make the most noise get fche most out of. any Government. Agitation amounts to a- very great deal, at least that is my experience," stated Sir W. A. Vcich, M.P., at a Chamber of Commerce) meeting at Wanganui.

At the Supreme Court at Invercargill yesterday, before Mr Justice Sim, William Lyons, aged 23 years, who pleaded guilty to breaking and, entering, was sentenced to reformative treatment for'throe years.

Tho Council of Conciliation yesterday (says a Press Association message) bad before it the dispute in which tho Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Labourers'. Union sought to obtain hours, wages, and working conditions in respect of men employed on threshing mills. After some discussion of •lie demands, the dispute was referred to the Court of Arbitration.

Last week a Wellington firm advertised for a junior clerk at a salary of £2 per week, and 90 applications were received. The ages of tho applicants ranged up to 35 years. The man who was 35 years of age is well educated, str.d can" speak two languages, yet he was willing to accept a junior's position —one that a youth could fill. He received the appointment, and was glad to secure it. Is this a sign of tho times?

A wooden leg is not usually a cause of rejoicing—sometimes it is. The Rev. Harry Owens, an evangelist from America, told the members of the Methodist Conference.in Sydney last week of the ardent Christian, in a class meeting, who rejoiced because he had a wooden lee. He used to say that one of his useful limbs was on earth—the other was in heaven: "Not lost, but gone before." Amid the laughter following the remark, Mr Owens suggested that their good friend could think of his absent leg already walking the streets of gold. '

Thero are several factors in operation which will contribute to a drop in the price of land, says tho Masterton " Ago." First of all, the interest on money is hardening. Then the cost of production is annually - .increasing. Again, the rates and taxes arc mounting up, and the markets are showing loss buoyancy than in former years. It is well that those who are in possession of the land, and those who are contemplating buying, should road tho writing, on the wall. We have had a period of fat years. We do not want 'tho loan. But those who are wise will bo prepared for a fall- in the prices of land.

The following sales of sheep were made at Addinglon on Wednesday on behalf of County farmers: Fat lambs: R. Campbell (Chertsey). 54 at 21s 9d to 22s 4d; H. Mucklo (Doric), 60 at 19s 7d. Fat sheep—Wethers: J. C. Lochhead (Rakaia), 140 at 19s 8d to 21s 7d; B. Mucklo (Doric), 64 at 19s lOd to 21s 6d; Orr Bros. (Meth'ven), 45 at 20s 4d to 21s 3d; W. Drummond (Lyndhurst), —' at 21s Id. Ewes: Orr Bros. (Methven), 75 at 18s to 20s 8d; Hearn Bros. (Rangitata), 50 at 17s lid to 19s 7d; F. Smith (Methven), 60 at 17s 3d to 18s l]d; M. Rooney (Lauriston), 01 at 17s 3d to 18s; W. Drummond (Lyndhurst), 64 at 16s 4d to 17s Id; Ashburton client, 66 at 16s to 17s Id.

Felix Tanner, 'of. Wellington, whose exploits in a queerly-constructed barrelshaped craft known as "Tanner's Ark" will bo remembered, is now in England, fasting. To, a member of the "Post" staff be has forwarded a pamphlet entitled: "Fasting as a Cure for Bodily Ailments and Disease," written, it is stated, after 23 years' experience by Felix Tanner, " tho Australian and New Zealand Fasting Man." Tanner also forwards particulars of his latest fast —from December 15, 1913, to January 24, 1914. He says: "I have completed a 40 days' and nights' .fast at Portsmouth, England, being the first Britisher to fast in England. I received two silvev cups and a gold medal from the sailors of his .Majesty's warships."

The present year will be of unusual interest to astronomers, for a glance at an astronomical almanac shows .that some thrilling phenomena are due to occur. Foremost in importance will be a transit of the planet Mercury across the sun's disc. It will take place on November 7, and will be visible from Greenwich. The phenomenon will_be of assistance in checking or modifying 'present estimates of the size of this planet and in ixugumenting the •/information concerning its atmosphere;. .- A total eclipse of the sun /on ■ August 21 will be visible as jv large partial eclipse at Greenwich. It will be .seen as a total eclipr.e from Norway and Sweden, .and astronomical parties are arranging to visit likely stations in those countries from which to watch the' event. Among die periodic comets which are J predicted to return this year are those of Tompel, Swift, Metca'lf, Giacobini, and last, but not least, Encke's comet, a; mysterious little body, almost as interesting as Halley's, whose vagaries have perplexed astronomers.

The Ashburton police recently raided a house in Allenton, where it. was suspected that an .illicit trade in liquor was being carried on, and as a result a charge of sly grog-selling will be preferred against the occupier of the house, at the Ashburton Magistrate's Court on March 20.

The Ashburton Hospital and Charitable Aid Board has forwarded Mr J. Young, Curator of the Christchurch Domain, a cheque for £10, to be exponded during his visit to Britain for the purpose of purchasing flowering shrubs for the decoration of the Ashburton Hospital grounds.

The Opunake "Times" states that a woman appeared in Court as defendant in a legal suit on Thursday last, who ploughs' her own farm, milks 30 cows night and morning, drives the milk to the factory, attends to the fencing—in fact, owns and manages the farm.

A terse description of the state of the iron trade in New Zealand was given by Mr W. Gable, of tho firm of Cable and Co., Kaiwarra, in the Wellington Arbitration Court. In referring to the men's demands for increased wages and shorter ■ hours, Mr Cable said: "It is like taking blood from a stone. It can't be squeezed."

While driving a flock of sheep near CTiarleville, Queensland, recently, the two drovers rested under a box tree. A heavy rainless cloud gathered 'suddenly overhead, and a flash of'lightning'-killed one man instantly, and stunned the other. It was three hours, .before tho later came to himself, to find his mate lying dead beside him, and their horses dead also. . ■ ;

The term of the subsidy granted by the Government to the Union Company for tho three-weekly service between Wellington and San Francisco expires on March 31. Negotiations are now proceeding between the .Government arid the company, and it is "understood that if an arrangement can be come to with regard to coastal freights on dairy produce it is practically certain that the subsidy will be renewed.

The Bluff "Press" states that the Rev. J. Sharp made rather touching reference on a recont evening to the old habit of putting threepenny bits into the church plate instead of something more valuable. "If we only had prohibition we would havo florins and even half-sovereigns," he said, "instead of threepenny bits.". He then added cautiously and with a heavy sigh, "not that we're not only too glad to get the threepenny bits!" (Loud laughter)-

The will of the 'late Mrs S. A. Rhodes, after providing legacies from £4000 downward for relatives (says a Wellington Press Association message), leaves £500 to the St. John Nursing Guild, £500 to the St. John Ambulance Association, £500 to. the Y.W.C.A., [£1000 to the Wellington Boys' Institute, nud smaller amounts to other institutions. The residue is to be divided between Victoria College for the education of women and the trustees of the Boys' Institute.

What have y6u did, if anything, to make the world better and brighter and nobler during the past year because you have lived in it, hey ? What have you did to scatter seeds of sunshine and hope and magninimity among your neighbours ? Have you treated your fellow-man like as if he was your brother or have.you gouged him every chance you'vevgbt. Havo you went to Church on Suiidajft like Cy Hoskins arid then foreclosed mortgages on widows and orphans all the rest of the week'? —Bingville Bugle (U.S.A.) . '

In the latest batch of papers to hand from London appeared the following paragraph by a note-writer -.—"Never in the history of modern England, I am told, were servant girls so scarce ar> they are now. I have just heard of a lady who replied to a girl's advertisement for a situation, received- no answer, and went to find out why. 'Oh.' said the girl, 'I've tx'-2n a place already. I had 127 answers to choose from !'"

A number of' orchardists in the Nelson district intend to follow the advice of Mr Cockayne, Government Biologist, and plant pinus insignis with a view to using tho timber for fruit cases. At the present time a couple of mon wlio own n portable circular saw bench and an oil engine are making .i. living in the Motueka and Riwsik.-i. districts by cutting lip poolars felled by local fruit-growers, who find the timber makes excellent cases for sending the produce of their orchards to the Wellington market.

In tho course of an address in Sydney recently the Primate (Dr. 'Wright) made eulogistic references to tho women of Australia, whom he described as the pride of,the nation. "It is sometimes said," proceeded his Grace, " that the womanhood of Australia forgets something of the dignity of their womanhood in decorum of manner and in decorum of dress. 1 do not believe it is true of Womanhood as a whole, if it is true now and ,<xgain.' But I am certain that the women of Australia, will rise to take care that these things shall not be, because of the solemn charge that they have for the future."

An early /arrival 'at Auckland' on Saturday, February Jl4 (says the ("New Zealand Herald'?,) was the German steamer . Burgermeister , Hachmann, which came from New' York, via St. Vincent, Durban, and Albany. The vessel has., just completed a voyage of'a somewhat sensational nature. In October, when -she was loading a cargo of pase oil at New 'York '■■'■ for Auckland and other New Zealand ports, a fire broke out amongst the inflammable cargo in No. 2 hold, where there were stored 32,000 cases.of benzine and other highly inflammable oils. ; - The fire burned with great rapidity, and for hours the' ship was a sheet of flames, forward. It appeared'as if the vessel was doom,ed. Then the ship was surrounded; by powerful fire; floats and the • steamer's; holds were flooded. ; So much ! water was pumped on board that she sank in the channel, and was eight days under water before it was found possible to float her. The cargo, which had not been damaged, was then discharged, and the steamer was drydocked and repaired.. She then loaded 165,000 cases of assorted oils and left New York on November 25. When^ a few days out she encountered a terrific storm, and suffered some damage to deck fittings as a result of the big seas which broke on board. Several cabin doors were stove in, and most of the deck cabins were flooded. The gale raged for six days, when .the weather moderated. The remainder of the passage was without incident, the usual, moderate gales and fine weather being! experienced.

"It only takes four generations to make a thoroughbred, wiien the principles of eugenics have a fair chance to operate," said Dr. Kellogg, the- celebrated health doctor at Battle Creek. "We have registers for horses, cattle, sheep, pigs, and even cats and dogs. H a lady wishes to establish the standing of her pet poodlo she can do so by appealing to an official record, and the puny canine may lift its head above its fellows as a born aristocrat, but nowhere on earth, as far as I know, is there to bo found a registry for human thoroughbreds."

A striking illustration of the terrible human waste in war is furnished by the census just taken of the new Bulgarian territories acquired by conquest. The male population of that portion of Macedonia allotted to Bulgaria was reduced during hostilities from 175,000 to 42.500. In Bulgarian Thrace only 225,----000 males remain out of a total before the war of 494,000, while in tho district of Mustapha Pasha, where fighting waged long and fiercely only 4000 males are left out of 33,000.

Present fashions for women _ are responsible to a degree for the high cost of living, according to Dr. Alonzo E. Tavlor. chemistry professor in the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania. "The 1914 styles," Dr. Taylor has'declared, "compel women to wear fewer-and thinner clothes. It requires .a- greater number of heat units to'maintain a normal temperature of the body, so it is readily" to be seen that a woman must eat- more." ' Dr. Taylor figures the increase at 10 per cent.

At the conclusion of the vice-regal function iri'the Domain yesterday, and after refreshments had been served by a representative committee of Ashburtou ladies in the marquee, their Excellencies, together with the 1; Mayor and Mayoress' and the Chairman of the County Council and County and Borough Councillors and prominent citizens, were photographed in a group. The May or, with others, then escorted his Excellency round the Domain and pointed out objects of interest. On returning from their tour of inspection, their Excellencies and party proceeded to the Coronation Gates, where their motor car was in waiting; and where n large crowd had assembled. Goodbyes having been said the Vice-Regal pnrtv left amid cheers for Longbeach at 5.10 p.m. ,

New problems are arising concerning aerial navigation, such as the question of guidance on starless nights or over fog-bound land, when the aeronaut will be unable to find his bearings. A German invention proposes that a network of wireless stations be established over the land, each automatically sending out a predetermined signal at regular intervals, which would be received by the aircraft, and enable the aeronaut to determine his course. The airships'would not be required to carry transmitting apparatus,, as a small receiving apparatus would suffice to enable them to avail themselves of this proposed system, and the weight of the receiving device could easily be kept down to a few pounds.

The daily supply of a budget of news for passengers on steamers fitted with wireless apparatus is part of a scheme submitted by the Federal PostmasterGeneral to shipping companies trading in Australian waters. Mr Wynne says he is prepared to supply 400 words of news per day to all passenger steamers within ' reach of Australian wirolesi stations at a cost of between £20 and £24 a year to each steamer. This would mean a miniature daily newspaper on each vessel. Mr Wynne has ordered a' reduction to 6d a word for messages to all ships in Australian waters.

I Complaints are made by housewives j (says an Auckland message) that the [ domostics coming out to the Dominion I are not of the class most wanted. i Several arrived by the Suffolk on Sunday, and numbers .of would-be employers endeavoured on Monday to .secure the services of some of them as "generals:" To the disappointment of the applicants, they learnt on inquiry that in tho great majority of cases tho new arrivals were " house j parlour-maids." It transpired that i few, if any, of those so classified could ! cook, wash, or scrub—three of the duties most essential in the average New Zealand household.

A juvenile Bill Sykes caused some excitement in the homo of a well-known Invercargill gentleman on Friday (the " Southland Times " states). Secure from the wintry wind which made conditions not altogether pleasant out of doors, tho members oi the household sat round a cheery fire After a titno the lady of the house rose to make the preliminary preparations for the evening meal, but in entering the kitchen she was confronted by a spectacle which made her eyes dilate. On the floor sat a small boy about eight years old-, .and around him in a splendid confusion were scattered the contents of the larder. Biscuits, bread, jam, butter, condensed milk, etc., were littered in every direction, while a recently baked rabbit pie >eposed in a pail of water, where it had been placed to cool by the enterprising juvenile. Eutry had been effected by means of a window, and the quietness with which the youngster' conducted himself indicated that he ■■knew what' ho 1 was about. It is understood that this was not the iirst incident of the kind known, to the locality, but as the culprit has, now been discovered it is possiblo that" it will be the-last. • -

Incited to'action by the persistent activities of agents-?*of the Dunedin Jiixpjinsion League (says the Invercargill correspondent of the Otago "Daily Times"), a number of Invercargiil business .■ men ■ have. formed themselves into'a. similar organisation for the ad(yancement of that city. Ay full meeting ;of the committee appointed to draw up a constitution for what was proposed to be a Southland Expansion League was held the other „evening. Mr W. D. Hunt was in the chair, A draft constitution was submitted, which provided, inter alia, that the organisation bo known as the "Southland League," that there b^ a central council, to consist of the president, vice-president, and members elected by the- various branches, according to ' memuprship (no branch to have more than five representatives), and representatives of local bodies (including sports societies), each ! to have one member. Each town wns to have a branch, and \ members of Parliament we.ro to be members of the council. Half the subscription was to be retained by each branch, the balances to be remitted to the council, and the snope of the league to be nil tho.t country which uses Bluff as its main port for-■•oversea trade. The constitution has been submitted to three legal members of the council, to draw upin regular, farm, and another meeting of the 1 commits.is ' shortly to be held, at which the date for thn rext public meeting will probably be fixed. J

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8816, 12 March 1914

Word Count
3,096

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8816, 12 March 1914

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